G   /   September 09, 2014   /   4 Comments

By Jason Shawhan

A Dame to Kill For is the sequel to 2005’s Sin City in the most literal way. Thematically, it’s part of a chain of adolescent, hyperviolent misogynist fantasies going back to 1980’s Heavy Metal: hard-boiled men who know the languages of violence and betrayal, and an assortment of noble virgins and streetwise whores to pepper the narrative with occasional frissons to distract from the murder and double-crossing. This is more of the same, but with one noticeable upgrade that allows co-directors Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller to claim some of the zeitgeist.

A Dame to Kill For is a must-see because of the transcendent performance of Eva Green. Much as she did with 300: Rise of the Empire earlier this year, she steps into a digital backlot and commits wholeheartedly to whatever the film requires. She’s got a gift for elevating material that has in 2014 alone made two sequels that nobody asked for into essential summer flicks, and it’s all due to force of will and a lack of inhibitions.

She’s always been a worthwhile screen presence, but it seems like she just recently found her groove — her Showtime series, Penny Dreadful, is a gleeful and atmospheric masterpiece of horror’s grand history, and she’s racking up great notices in films that are otherwise thrown to the hounds.

Hers is a remarkable face. She has a distinctive look, one that recalls screen beauties of the Golden Age of Hollywood; you realize that Green could have been a star at any point in Hollywood history since the ’20s. She’s got a brassy, glam sensibility that calls to mind Bergman, Bacall and Hepburn, but with the devilish sense of humor (and willingness to deploy the goods) of early ‘90s Sharon Stone.

As it stands, Green and Mickey Rourke are the only cast members who seem like they could actually pull off real noir — not just the monochromatic karaoke of so much of the Sin City franchise.

The rest is mostly a muddle. A Dame to Kill For jumps around in time, trying to serve as a prequel and a sequel to the 2005 original, but there’s a specific point where at least several months pass and there is no indication given to the viewer that this has happened. As always, if you’re engrossed in a story, it wouldn’t matter. If it weren’t for Green’s dynamic energy and carnal joie de vivre — and a competently funky Lady Gaga cameo that delivers classic Marisa Tomei realness — you’d be able to pinpoint the exact moment that the film loses its bearings.

Its box-office disaster last weekend doesn’t bode well, but let’s hope this film provides the impetus for an Eva Green/Angelina Jolie buddy film where they kick all ass. I would be there opening day, and you should be too.

Source: Nashville Scene

4 Responses to “Eva Green: Sin City’s Green Screen Queen and Sequel Savior”
  1. Jackie Says:

    Eva Green is the phoenix of ALL phoenix’s! Why you ask? Trust, its well deserved. She simply has the talent to ‘rise from the ashes’ unscathed and always slaying the part! I spent money on both films (300 & SC2) to see exactly what Eva provided…..perfection in an otherwise rudimentary setting.
    As always thank you Eva!

  2. Jessica Says:

    She elevates everything she’s in into art.

  3. alanfeierstein Says:

    The 2 Sin City Movies do blend well together; Eva did a great job.

  4. alanfeierstein Says:

    I had wished that Artemisia and Ava Lord did not have to be killed; in the scripts…This part was sad; the 2 movies are great…Eva knows her stuff in making greatness.