Archive for the ‘Article’ Category
G   /   May 19, 2019   /   0 Comments

by Tom Grater
 
 
Charles Dance has joined the cast of sci-fi A Patriot alongside Eva Green and Helen Hunt, with the project now heading for an August shoot.

Dan Pringle is attached to direct from an original screenplay he wrote. Adam J. Merrifield is producing through White Lantern Film, which he runs with Pringle.

John McDonnell and Brendan Mccarthy of Fantastic Films have joined the film as co-producers; their feature Vivarium premiered in Cannes Critics Week yesterday (May 18).

Executive producers are Damian Jones and John Giwa-Amu. The project is now in prep and is due to shoot in August 1 in Dublin for six weeks, with The Exchange handling sales in Cannes.

A Patriot takes place in a future authoritarian state that has walled itself away from a world ravaged by climate chaos and resource wars. The story follows an unquestioning Border Corp Captain as she fights to defend the purity of the population, until a chance discovery makes her doubt the authorities she has pledged her allegiance and life to protect.

The feature is fully-financed by Piccadilly Pictures and is a UK, Ireland, Belgium co-production. Dutch Angle are Belgium co-producers on the film.

A Patriot was previously announced with Tim Robbins and Kathy Bates, who both departed due to scheduling conflict and have been replaced by Dance and Hunt respectively.
 
 
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G   /   March 19, 2019   /   0 Comments

by Brian Davids
 
 
After inspiring James Bond’s Vesper martini, Eva Green is flying high yet again thanks to Tim Burton’s Dumbo.

As positive social media reactions roll in for Disney’s live-action reimagining of its classic animated film, Green has a lot to be proud of as she not only flew Dumbo but conquered her deep-rooted fear of heights in the process. The Casino Royale star plays aerialist Colette Marchant, and much to Green’s dismay, director Tim Burton requested that she perform some of Colette’s aerial stunts.

After a couple months of rigorous training alongside circus performers and acrobats, Green realized that she just might be able to pull off the impossible.

This is Green’s third collaboration with Burton, and the actor has become known for stepping into highly stylized worlds. But she first broke out in a grounded and hard-edged reboot, 2006’s Casino Royale. Green’s star-making role of Vesper Lynd helped launch the Daniel Craig era of Bond films, and her performance still has many 007 enthusiasts ranking her as the preeminent “Bond girl.”

Oddly enough, Green nearly missed out on her breakout role after turning down an audition nine months prior to actually getting the part. By the time producers returned to Green, production was looming and Angelina Jolie and Charlize Theron were also in the running.

“I was probably a bit stupid or naive. I said, ‘Ugh, a Bond girl? What kind of prissy girl is that?’ They also kept the script secret,” Green tells The Hollywood Reporter. “So it wasn’t until they gave me the script [nine months later] that I realized it was a meaty role. I didn’t see her as a Bond girl. She’s a strong character; she’s got cracks.”

In a conversation with THR, Green opens up about working with Tim Burton for the third time, her reluctance to return to her native French accent for Dumbo, and her fondness for Bond producer Barbara Broccoli.

Clearly, you thrive alongside Tim Burton since Dumbo is your third film together. What makes his sets such a fertile environment for you to create?
First of all, he’s such a kind man. You feel safe as he always wants the actors to feel comfortable. There’s never any judgement or anything like that. His sets are very playful. You don’t have the pressure or the tension that you might have on other projects. He just trusts you; he lets you be free. He also has a very particular way of communicating as well. He would draw and say, “This is how I see the scene.” Suddenly, off we go. It’s just a fun way to be working.

Would you say that he’s an actor’s director? Does he spend a lot of time on performance?
He’s not the king of words, and I, myself, am not the queen of words. He is a more physical director; he speaks with his hands. You kind of understand what he wants with the vibe that he exudes. It’s a very particular way of working, and it’s difficult to explain, exactly. It’s more visceral.

With the exception of Dumbo himself, this film was mostly shot in-camera by way of practical sets and effects. I presume fully realized sets only complement your performance?
Totally. The sets were so complete, which is quite rare. Now most sets are very minimal with lots of greenscreen and just a few props. But with Dumbo, you felt like you were going back to the golden era of Hollywood. It was so big with all the extras — and very colorful and vibrant. We even had a jazz band so you could really get into the mood. When all the characters are in the car and driving through Dreamland, it was really, really magical.

Do you find a personal connection to your characters including your Dumbo character, Colette Marchant?
As an actor, you always use your own self. It’s your instrument; it’s your body. Of course, there are bits of me in her. It’s an interesting character; it’s also somebody that I’ve never played before. It’s somebody much clearer and lighter than the characters I’ve played in the past. She’s fun to play; she’s haughty and cold at the beginning. And then she gets to see Dumbo fly, which changes absolutely everything. She will do absolutely anything to help Dumbo and reunite him with his mum. It’s a very sweet story, and Colette is a fun, playful character.

You’re afraid of heights, and yet you’re playing an aerialist. You actually did some of Colette’s trapeze artistry in the film. Were these stunts as terrifying as you expected? Do you ever forget about your own fears when in character?
My fear of heights and swinging is really serious. Even as a child, I couldn’t get on swings at 4 years old. It was a real issue. Roller coasters — I couldn’t do any of that. So when Tim said I would have to do some of my own stunts, I kind of panicked. (Laughs.) He said, “You’re gonna train for a couple months with circus performers, and we’ll see how we go.” I was secretly hoping that, at the end, he’d use the body of an acrobat and add my head in post (Laughs.). But then I started training seriously — three to four hours per day — with those amazing trainers and acrobats. Little by little, I got higher and higher. It was a very hard thing because it requires a lot of strength as well; it’s not just fear. So, on top of it, you have to get really strong –– core and arms. The circus people were just so dedicated and gave me lots of confidence. We went quite step-by-step, and I can’t believe I managed to do those things. I always thought I would be afraid of heights for life, and it’s really in facing my fear that I was able to overcome it. I’m very proud of myself on that one.

Throughout your career, you’ve trained to control your French accent in order to play British and American characters. Since you return to your native French accent in Dumbo, is it more difficult than it should be since you’ve spent so much time trying to neutralize or unlearn your French accent?
It’s funny because I remember I had a lot of pressure from the studio on Casino Royale to get a British accent. So I worked really hard to get rid of my French-ness. Now I live in London, so to go back to the French thing would be unnatural. When Tim said, “She’s a very French character, and it would add some color if you had a French accent.” And I said, “No, I can’t go there!” (Laughs.) It’s interesting because it’s actually the perfect accent for Colette. It helped me to create who she is. It suddenly changes everything when you have an accent. As an actor, it’s really wonderful to be able to play with your voice; you get out of yourself. So, that was actually very helpful.

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G   /   March 17, 2019   /   0 Comments

by Janet Susan R. Nepales
 
 
Los Angeles — It is always a thrill to watch anything that Tim Burton does. And that includes his version of the well-loved 1941 Disney classic, “Dumbo.”

We were able to talk to the eccentric director as well as his talented and extraordinary cast composed of Colin Farrell (Holt Farrier), Eva Green (Colette Merchant), Danny DeVito (Max Medici) and Michael Keaton (V.A. Vandevere).

They shared with us their experiences creating and collaborating with the genius filmmaker and making this fantasy adventure live-action remake a reality.

Below are excerpts of our conversations with them:
*article edited to only included Eva’s part. Kindly click on source to read the full interview with Tim Burton and the rest of the Dumbo cast.*

Eva Green

When did you first see “Dumbo” and how was the experience shooting with Tim and the animals?
I saw the original movie when I was 4 or 5 years old. I have great appreciation now with the aerialists in the circus, because I am afraid of heights. So, I had to strengthen my arms and core, overcame my fear of heights. I love animals, I like the animals to be free, especially the elephants in Africa. When you see the result on screen, it’s so amazing, so realistic, the elephants. It is so sophisticated, it’s quite a wonderful job.

Did you ever go to a circus when you were a child? Which animals did you like?
It’s funny, I probably went twice as a child, and I always felt a bit sad. I don’t know what it was, there’s something, I don’t know if it was the clown or — but there was something. I don’t know, I can’t really explain it. But now, maybe it’s just seeing these wild animals in the circuses, it’s very sad. It doesn’t make sense that they are in captivity and children could feel that. I’m just very proud, as well, that Disney is taking a stand and is promoting animal-free circuses. Even zoos, we should not have wild animals in zoos. I went to Africa a few times and it’s so magical when you see those animals being free. It makes sense that they are free and not stuck in cages.

Do you see yourself as the muse of Tim Burton? You worked on several movies together. How would you describe your relationship with Tim?
I don’t know, I find the term very intimidating. I’m not sure. It’s very flattering, of course, but I’m just much honored that he’s asked for me for a third time. It’s so wonderful to be able to play characters that are so different, as well. You know, “Dark Shadows,” she was kind of a bonkers witch, a wounded witch. Then, Miss Peregrine, a woman-bird, and then here, a trapeze artist. She is a clearer character than the two others I’ve done with him. I’m just much honored that he’s given me those gifts.

What did you learn about your body being an aerialist?
It was very intense training, because I’m terrified of heights. So, it was a really big challenge. Tim asked me to do some of my own stunts, so I was like, “Okay, I’m going to try. But I can’t assure that this is going to work.” But I really tried, and I worked intensively with some circus people, like every day, two, three hours. First of all, you have to get like a really strong core, very strong arms. Then you get up there. But we went step by step, and it was amazing because I surprised myself. I thought I would never be able to do this. These people were very patient with me, and they gave me lots of confidence. I managed to take off, thanks to them.

Would you do it again?
Yeah, you know what? There’s a circus school in London, and it’s such a great workout because it’s also very playful. I love the girl, Katherine Arnold, she taught me, and she teaches over there, as well. So, definitely.
 
 
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G   /   March 15, 2019   /   0 Comments

by Ruben V. Nepales
 
 
LOS ANGELES—“Oooo la-la,” Eva Green cooed when asked about her white lace and black leather dress in our recent interview. “It’s Alexander McQueen,” she said.

Eva stars as Colette Marchant, an aerialist, in Tim Burton’s live action remake of Disney’s animated classic, “Dumbo.”

Colin Farrell, Michael Keaton, Danny DeVito and Alan Arkin are also featured in the endearing tale of a young elephant who can fly.

“I saw the original movie when I was 4 or 5 years old,” recalled the French actress whose eyes are, well, green. They are her best assets. Whether onscreen or in person, Eva mesmerizes with those eyes.

The former Bond Girl will also be seen this year in Alice Winocour’s “Proxima,” which is buzzed as a possible Cannes Film Festival entry in May if its postproduction work is done in time. Eva plays an astronaut who is training to go on a one-year mission in the International Space Station.

The Paris native is also in the cast of Dan Pringle’s science-fiction thriller, “A Patriot,” where she portrays Kate Jones, a Border Corp Captain in the story set in the future.

On television, Eva, who earned quite a following for her Vanessa Ives role in the “Penny Dreadful” series (which will get a spinoff with a different cast), landed the Lydia Wells part in the miniseries, “The Luminaires.” Eve Hewson costars with Eva in the TV adaptation of the novel set in the 1860s gold rush in New Zealand.

Excerpts from our chat:

This is your third movie with Tim Burton. You once gave him a bug specimen for his birthday …
God, it must have been a few years ago. Maybe I got it in The Evolution Store in New York. I can’t remember what it was.

It’s not your hobby to collect bugs?
I used to have a few bugs, but I don’t do that anymore. I’m vegan and I don’t have stuffed things anymore. I’m a good girl now.

What has changed you?
No. I haven’t really changed. People have always put me in the dark category because maybe I have dark hair, or I do intense, complicated movies sometimes.

Some consider you as the muse of Tim Burton now.
I find the term very intimidating. I’m not sure. It’s very flattering, of course, but I’m very honored that he asked for me for a third time. It’s wonderful to be able to play characters that are so different. In “Dark Shadows,” she was kind of a bonkers witch (laughs), a wounded witch. And then, Miss Peregrine, who is a woman-bird. Then here, a trapezist, a clearer character than those in the two other movies I’ve done with him.

How different are these characters from you?
Very different. You are your own instrument. You’re using your own emotions, so it’s part of you. But I’m many things. When people meet me, they think I’m very serious. But I don’t think I am. I’m serious about the craft, but I don’t take myself seriously.

How do you see Tim Burton as a person? Some see him as quirky.
He’s a very nice person. Very grounded. I don’t find him strange. He’s different, maybe. But weird? He’s not weird, he’s just wonderful. He’s very true, very real. He doesn’t lie. And he’s very pure, which is very rare in this business. He’s very passionate, very compassionate, extremely sensitive. He will always be very open to the actors. He really wants to hear what they’re thinking. He wants them to be comfortable.

How do you deal with the paparazzi who sometimes hound you, and fame?
It’s not that bad. I have the ability to make myself invisible, as well.

When did you realize that your mother (actress Marlene Jobert) was famous?
When people asked for her autograph on the street. Or sometimes, if she wanted something special from the bakery, I had to say, “I am the daughter of …,” then people change their attitude. I never liked that. You can see straight away when it’s real or not, when people are really connecting.

What were your memories of going to the circus as a child?
I probably went twice as a child, and I always felt a bit sad. I don’t know if it was the clowns, but there was something. I can’t explain it. Maybe it’s just seeing these wild animals in the circuses. It doesn’t make sense that they are in captivity. I think children could feel that.

What did you learn about your body from playing an aerialist?
I have great appreciation now for the aerialists in the circus, because I am afraid of heights. So, I had to strengthen my arms and overcome my fear of heights. Training was very intense. So, it was a big challenge. I worked intensively with some circus people every day for two to three hours.

Would you like to join the circus?
I’m in the circus every day (laughs).

“Penny Dreadful” gets a new incarnation, “Penny Dreadful: City of Angels.” What do you think of that?
I’m very happy it’s having another life. I don’t really know the story. I know it’s happening in LA in 1938. But yeah, I’m quite nostalgic, as well. Those three years were so intense. It was such a wonderful character, and the character still haunts me.

Bernardo Bertolucci, who directed your film debut, “The Dreamers,” died in November last year. Can you talk about making that film? There was a lot of nudity with you, Michael Pitt and Louis Garrel.
Before doing “The Dreamers,” I had a gigantic poster of “Last Tango in Paris” in my room. I was obsessed. My parents were a bit reluctant when I agreed to do that film, but I read the story. And the sex and nudity was completely justified. It was not gratuitous. And Bernardo was very caring. He never, ever forced us to do anything. He let us be. It was a wonderful experience, and it’s one of my favorite experiences, actually. I was very shy. But when you are out doing the scene, you know it is for the movie. You believe in the movie, and you feel a bit numb. It’s like you forget that you’re naked. You’re in character, and you’re doing a scene.

Do you keep in touch with Louis and Michael?
Yes. We send messages to each other. There’s that strong bond as it was our first movie—a very strong kind of friendship.

Are you like some actors who don’t watch their films?
Oh, God. I never watch my movies. It sounds very narcissistic. But it’s too painful for me because I can’t be objective. It’s just that I feel too self-conscious.

Does your mother talk to you about retiring?
No, she doesn’t. She’s aware that it’s a crazy business. You’re constantly being judged, and you want to be desired, you want to find the next job.
 
 
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G   /   March 12, 2019   /   0 Comments

by Paul Chi
 
 
As Daniel Craig’s final James Bond adventure nears the start of production—and a newly announced release date of April 8, 2020—there are already numerous rumors about who might replace Craig as 007. Game of Thrones alum Richard Madden is speculated to be on the short list, while other reports have long linked Idris Elba to the role—though by now, Elba seems to have made his peace with the fact that he might never play Bond.

There’s even been talk on social media arguing that a woman should play the MI6 agent next, including from Elba himself: a future Bond “could be a woman—could be a black woman, could be a white woman,” he told Variety in 2018. “Do something different with it. Why not?” Actresses including Emilia Clarke, Priyanka Chopra, Gillian Anderson, and Elizabeth Banks have all indicated that they would happily take on a gender-swapped version of the role.

But Eva Green—the French actress who played Vesper Lynd, the Bond girl who broke the British super-spy’s heart in 2006’s Casino Royale—is against the idea of a female 007.

“I’m for women, but I really think James Bond should remain a man. It doesn’t make sense for him to be a woman,” said Green at the premiere of her latest movie, Disney’s Dumbo, in Hollywood on Monday night. “Women can play different types of characters, be in action movies and be superheroes, but James Bond should always be a man and not be Jane Bond. There is history with the character that should continue. He should be played by a man.”

Green echoed a point made previously by Rachel Weisz, who said in 2018 that she would not want to see a female Bond because original author Ian Fleming “devoted an awful lot of time to writing this particular character, who is particularly male and relates in a particular way to women.” Instead, Weisz proposed, “Why not create your own story rather than jumping onto the shoulders and being compared to all those other male predecessors?” “Women are really fascinating and interesting, and should get their own stories,” she continued. And for the record, Bond producer Barbara Broccoli also agrees: “Bond is male,” she said flatly last year. “He’s a male character. He was written as a male and I think he’ll probably stay as a male.”

Although she’s not in favor of a Doctor Who-style gender swap, Green is proud to have helped to change the narrative of female characters in the Bond franchise, moving them from sexy damsels in distress to smart, assertive, and powerful figures.

“I love the fact that the Bond girls have evolved,” said Green, who plays a fearless, high-flying aerialist in Disney’s new live-action reimagining of its beloved 1941 animated tale. “I originally had reservations about being a Bond girl. I didn’t want to be a bimbo. The women are now perceived differently. They are intelligent and sassy and fascinating. I loved playing Vesper. She’s the only one to get to Bond’s heart and has a big impact on his life.”

Green will not reunite with Craig for his final go-around as 007, with director Cary Fukunaga helming the project. Still, she called him the most “iconic” and “visceral” actor to play Bond yet.

“He’s made James Bond human,” she said. “We see him flawed and vulnerable. He’s the best James Bond we have seen.”
 
 
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G   /   October 13, 2018   /   0 Comments

by Craig McLean
 
 
A year after the movie mogul’s disgrace, Bond actor Eva Green speaks for the first time to Craig McLean about surviving in a sexist industry — and why London beats Paris for pubs and trees.

BRITAIN’S favourite witchy actress has been considering the hex that Brexit is casting on the country. She has to. Eva Green is an adoptive Londoner of 13 years’ standing. But, despite that Anglo-sounding surname — and a career-launching role as a cut-glass-accented HM Treasury official in Casino Royale, Daniel Craig’s first outing as James Bond — she’s French.

“For me as a French resident, I’m thinking, what’s going to happen?” ponders Maida Vale-based Green.

“Are they going to kick me out? Do I need to get a British passport? Should I marry an Englishman? No, I won’t go that far,” she jokes.

Does she feel rejected as a European expat living here? “No, because everybody is against it in London. But I’m quite scared, waiting for the tsunami to come. Some people have left already.”

Still, it’s hard to imagine this redoubtable 38-year-old upping sticks for home. For one thing, the Paris-born daughter of a French actress mother and Swedish dentist father has forged a career acting in Anglo-American projects in her second language. Oui, in her next two films she plays Frenchwomen: a single-mother astronaut headed for the International Space Station in Proxima, and a trapeze artist in Dumbo, the live action reimagining of the Disney classic directed by Tim Burton (her third film with the London-based American).

But broadly: “Bond girl” Vesper Lynd, flying sorceress Serafina Pekkala in The Golden Compass, Morgana in TV series Camelot, the titular headmistress in Burton’s Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the witch who curses Johnny Depp in Burton’s Dark Shadows, and the demon-battling Vanessa Ives in Sky Atlantic’s Penny Dreadful are all English-language characters. Not to mention all parts with something of the night about them.

Green — who is considerably more fun in person than her gothic roles would suggest — feels at home here. Having come to London to study at South Kensington’s Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art when she was 17, she’s been based here almost her entire career.

“I love the fact that London is so green. There are so many trees. There are no trees in Paris; well, not many. It’s weird. When I go there I get frustrated.”

That Anglophilia is probably one reason Green has been chosen to star in a short film for classic British car marque: Jaguar.

“Jaguar is such a legend, for a French person anyway,” Green tells me when we meet in a studio near Hanger Lane, the base for the Jaguar shoot. “When you imagine Jaguar you imagine them in old movies, something beautiful and classy. This felt very special — and British special as well.”

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G   /   September 26, 2018   /   1 Comment

The-Luminaries-Cast

 
Sin City star Eva Green and The Knick’s Eve Hewson are to star in BBC Two adaptation of The Luminaries.

The pair will star in the six-part drama, produced by Working Title Television alongside New Zealand actor Marton Csokas, who starred in Lord of the Rings.

Green plays Lydia Wells, while Hewson stars as Anna Wetherell and Csokas stars as Francis Carver.

The drama is based on Eleanor Catton’s 2013 Man Booker Prize winner The Luminaries. She adapts. The period tale of adventure and mystery is set on the Wild West Coast of New Zealand’s South Island in the boom years of the 1860s gold rush. It’s billed as an epic story of love, murder and revenge, as men and women traveled across the world to make their fortunes.

Working Title Television will produce for BBC Two and TVNZ with Catton and WTT’s Andrew Woodhead, Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner exec producing. Lucy Richer exec produces for the BBC.

Kicking off in 1865, the story follows defiant young adventurer Anna Wetherell, who has sailed from Britain to New Zealand to begin a new life. There she meets the radiant Emery Staines, an encounter that triggers a strange kind of magic that neither can explain. But Anna must survive the dangerous world, where shipwreck and murder, blackmail and betrayal, greed, gold and false imprisonment all conspire to keep her apart from Emery. The star-crossed lovers begin to wonder: Do we make our fortunes, or do our fortunes make us?

Green says, “I’m thrilled to be joining Working Title and this wonderful team. Eleanor has written a series of brilliant screenplays. I loved her original novel and it’s so exciting that her own screen adaptation reveals yet more exquisite material.”

Director Claire McCarthy added, “Ever since I read Eleanor’s incredible novel I’ve been completely captivated by the rich world she has created. What an honor to bring this beautiful and original work to the screen. I’m delighted to be joining forces with such wonderful actors and dynamic creative team.”

Andrew Woodhead, executive producer and MD at Working Title Television UK said, “It is such a privilege to work with Ellie, Claire and our New Zealand partners at Southern Light on this unique and magical story. To now have such an amazing cast led by Eva, Eve and Marton joining us on our Luminaries journey is also truly exciting and a testament to the beauty and brilliance of Ellie’s writing.”
 
 
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G   /   September 15, 2018   /   4 Comments

Eva’s feature cover and editorial for InStyle Russia’s September 2018 issue has been added to the gallery. We also added an English translation courtesy of our contributor Irina. Thank you to InStyle Russia for providing the scans and to Irina for kindly translating the interview!
 



 

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G   /   June 25, 2018   /   0 Comments

Eva-Green-AMPAS-Welcome

 
We’re thrilled to relay the news that Eva is now a Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) member. Eva joins the other 926 new diverse members that consist of 49% female and 38% people of colour. Congratulations to each new members !
 
 
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G   /   April 27, 2018   /   0 Comments

by Andreas Wiseman
 
 
Eva Green, Kathy Bates and Ed Skrein are attached to star in sci-fi thriller A Patriot, which Brian O’Shea’s The Exchange will launch world sales on in Cannes. Currently in pre-production, the movie’s screenplay comes from Dan Pringle (K-Shop) and Toby Rushton (Monsters) with Pringle also attached to direct. Project is being produced by Adam Merrifield (K-Shop) from White Lantern Film and John Giwa-Amu (The Machine) from Red & Black Films with Angus Finney (The Mother) executive producing.

The script takes place in a future authoritarian state that has walled itself away from a world ravaged by climate chaos and resource wars. The story follows the unquestioning Border Corp Captain Kate Jones (Green) as she fights to defend the purity of the population, until a chance discovery makes her doubt the authorities she has pledge her allegiance and life to protect.

The Exchange’s Cannes lineup includes Aja Naomi King’s A Girl From Mogadishu, Ethan Hawke’s Blaze and Jeremiah Zagar’s We The Animals.

Sin City and Penny Dreadful star Green is represented by Tavistock Wood Management and UTA, Oscar-winner Bates by ICM and Deadpool star Skrein by 42, CAA and Bloom, Hergott Diemer Rosenthal Laviolette Feldman Schenkman & Goodman.
 
 
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G   /   September 07, 2017   /   7 Comments

by Rhonda Richford
 
 
Eva Green is set to star in a new astronaut action-drama from Disorder director and Mustang co-writer Alice Winocour.

Winocour is currently prepping the project, tentatively titled Proxima, for a nine-week shoot beginning in January. Green will be joined by German actor Lars Eidinger (Sils Maria, Sense8). An American co-star is soon to be announced for the bilingual drama.

Green will play an astronaut with the European Space Agency (ESA) that is preparing to go on a one-year mission to the International Space Station (ISS), but must first face intense training as well as the impending separation from her 7-year-old daughter.

Winocour says the story takes place as Green’s character prepares to depart. “[It] is just before the launch, which is the worst part of the astronaut’s training. Because when they get in space they are ready for everything, but just before is really the hard part — how to say goodbye to your relatives, how to prepare your body for space,” she told The Hollywood Reporter. “It’s really about how you put your fears and pain into something bigger than your life.”

“The idea is also to have an astronaut that can be a superheroine and at the same time a mother, because I think in movies mothers are always very weak characters. It’s time that women should assume that you can be an astronaut and a mother too,” she said, speaking at the Deauville Film Festival, where she is on the jury.

Green will be trained by French astronaut Thomas Pesquet, who completed a six month ISS tour in June alongside American astronaut Peggy Whitson. Pesquet’s return has created a media frenzy in France and boosted public interest in the ESA.

Winocour will be partnering with the ESA to film at their headquarters in Cologne, Germany, as well as the Russian Space Agency to film a launch in Kazakhstan. The director has already traveled to Kazakhstan to view a launch, fueling her passion for the project she has been researching for two years.

The story was inspired in part by the Cesar winner’s own separation from her 7-year-old daughter while shooting and promoting films away from home, she said, as well as her fascination with space. “I thought space is always in science fiction movies, but now it is our reality,” she said of creating a more down-to-earth drama.

Green was cast because she embodies an otherworldliness that Winocour has come to know in astronauts. “I think Eva has this thing that she is here and in another world as well, that she’s not on earth. And I think she’s really sexy too,” said Winocour of the former Bond girl, who also stars in Tim Burton’s upcoming live-action Dumbo. “I think it’s time for her to play in her native language and to act something less gothic, maybe more human.”

She cites James Cameron’s The Abyss as an inspiration for the tone of the film.

The film will be produced by Dharamsala, Winocour’s collaborators on her previous films Augustine and Disorder, and distributed by Pathe.
 
 
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G   /   July 16, 2017   /   4 Comments

Tim-Burton-On-Set-of-Dumbo

 
Disney has officially confirmed the start of production on director Tim Burton’s live-action Dumbo movie. It was Burton’s own live-action Alice in Wonderland adaptation (which was released in 2010) that kicked off the current trend of the Mouse House re-making its animated classics in live-action. Since then, the Mouse House has released such movies as Maleficent, Cinderella, The Jungle Book and most recently Beauty and the Beast to big returns at both the domestic and global box office, as well as a strong critical reception in the case of Cinderella and The Jungle Book in particular (with Jungle Book picking up an Oscar for its groundbreaking visual effects too).

Based on the 1941 animated Disney classic of the same name, Dumbo reunites Burton with a few members of his trusted acting ensemble; including, Michael Keaton, making this his first film with Burton since Batman Returns in 1992; Danny DeVito, who costarred in Batman Returns and last worked with Burton on Big Fish in 2003; and Eva Green, who collaborated with Burton on Dark Shadows in 2012 and Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children in 2016. Also teaming up with Burton here, for the first time, is Colin Farrell in a leading role.

All four of the aforementioned actors are now confirmed for the Dumbo cast, along with young newcomers Nico Parker and Finley Hobbins, as well as Roshan Seth (Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom), DeObia Oparei (Independence Day: Resurgence), Sharon Rooney (Two Doors Down) and Douglas Reith (Downton Abbey) in supporting roles. In addition to confirming that production is underway now, Disney released the following synopsis for Dumbo, along with a picture of Burton on the film’s set:

Disney’s new live-action feature film Dumbo introduces Holt Farrier (Farrell), a former circus star who finds his life turned upside down when he returns from the war. Circus owner Max Medici (DeVito) enlists Holt to care for a newborn elephant whose oversized ears make him a laughingstock in an already struggling circus. But when Holt’s children (Parker and Hobbins) discover that Dumbo can fly, persuasive entrepreneur V.A. Vandevere (Keaton) and an aerial artist named Colette Marchant (Green) swoop in to make the peculiar pachyderm a star.

The film will be released on March 29, 2019.
 
 
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G   /   July 08, 2017   /   3 Comments


 
Photographer: Sébastien Micke
Shot on location at the La Terrasse Club by Albane in Cannes, France on May 27, 2017

D’après une histoire vraie (Based on a True Story) will open in French cinemas on November 1.
 
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– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2017 > Paris Match – June 1-7, 2017

G   /   March 08, 2017   /   9 Comments

By Diana Lodderhose
 
 
EXCLUSIVE: Eva Green is in talks to star in Tim Burton’s Dumbo, the live-action adaptation of the 1941 animated classic for Disney. Sources tell me she’s being eyed for one of the three main adult roles in the title, which is edging closer and closer towards a production start.

A Green-Burton reunion would make a lot of sense given the sizzling actress seems to be the director’s new muse, and Burton has a habit of working again and again with actors he likes. Green played the title character in Burton’s family fantasy Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children, based on the novel by Ransom Riggs. It grossed $297.4M worldwide last year. She also starred in Burton’s vampire comedy Dark Shadows alongside Johnny Depp and Michelle Pfeiffer, which generated $254.5M worldwide in 2012.

The live-action remake of Dumbo is written by Ehren Kruger, who produces with Justin Springer (Tron: Legacy). Disney’s original version focused on a big-eared, lovable circus elephant, who is mocked for his large ears but learns to use them as wings to fly.

It’s the latest in Disney’s long line of reboots: This month, the studio is set to release a live-action version of Beauty and the Beast, starring Emma Watson, Luke Evans and Dan Stevens, and Emma Stone is set to star as villainess Cruella De Vil in the upcoming 101 Dalmatians. The studio has had huge success with reinventions of classic animated fares like Angelina Jolie starrer Maleficent and Johnny Depp’s Alice In Wonderland, the latter of which was directed by Burton. Those pics earned $758.5M and $1.02B worldwide respectively. Its 2015 reboot of Cinderella starring Lily James took $543.5M worldwide.

Green has been hugely in-demand lately. After a successful run on Showtime’s psychological thriller series Penny Dreadful, the French actress starred in Miss Peregrine and then worked with Roman Polanski on his latest title Based on a True Story, which is currently in post. She’s also starred alongside Alicia Vikander, Charles Dance and Charlotte Rampling in Lisa Langseth’s Euphoria, about two sisters who meet up again after many years apart and the profound journey that they undertake together.

Green is also attached to star with Gemma Arterton in Vita and Virginia, a title which looks at the love affair between Virginia Woolf (Green) and Vita Sacksville-West (Arterton). But word is that should the Dumbo deal make, dates for that title will have to be shifted.

Green is repped by UTA in the U.S. and Tavistock Wood in the UK.
 
 
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G   /   February 15, 2017   /   0 Comments

By Jeremy Kay
 
 
EXCLUSIVE: Psychological thriller recently wrapped production in Paris.

Sony Pictures Classics (SPC) has picked up North American rights to the French-language thriller, continuing its association with the director after the 2011 drama Carnage.

RatPac Entertainment will partner on distribution with SPC, who negotiated for the rights with Jeff Berg of Northside Services.

Emmanuelle Seigner stars as a Parisian author with writer’s block who encounters a mysterious woman at a book signing played by Eva Green. Wassim Beji of WY Productions serves as producer.

Olivier Assayas and Polanski adapted Based On A True Story from Delphine de Vigan’s novel of the same name.

“I am very pleased that Sony Pictures Classics will be distributing Based On A True Story in North America,” Polanski said. “Sony Classics is a company that has long tradition in supporting European cinema. I am looking forward to working again with Michael Barker and Tom Bernard.’

SPC said: “Based On A True Story is the kind of thriller audiences are hungering for, as exceptional and fresh as Repulsion and The Tenant were in their day. Polanski’s new film promises to be his very best.”
 
 
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