Archive for the ‘Article’ Category
M.   /   July 15, 2016   /   3 Comments


Photographers: Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott
Stylist: Edward Enninful
Hair: Shay Ashual
Make-Up: DickPage
Manicure: Naomi Yasuda
Set Design: Andrea Stanley

GALLERY LINK:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > W Magazine – August 2016

G   /   July 08, 2016   /   2 Comments

by Drew McWeeny

The first real rabid Penny Dreadful fan I talked to was Greg Ellwood here at HitFix. He was a steadfast believer the entire time it was on the air, and he encouraged me to watch it. I was busy cutting the cord, though, moving away from cable subscriptions. I had no cable in the house, none in my office, and chose not to watch anything on TV. I used Hulu, Netflix, HBO Now, Amazon Prime. And if a show didn’t land in one of the services I used, then it just went on a list of things to watch someday. Maybe.

Today is that day for Penny Dreadful for me. After Greg, the person who really picked up that ongoing advocacy for the show was Brian Duffield, who shares my deep abiding love of Eva Green’s work, and he has always been insistent that I was missing some of her very best work by not finding a way to watch the show. I couldn’t justify all of the expense for one title, though. I just waited, and when I moved into my new apartment this week, I finally reversed course, buying a cable/Internet bundle with a very healthy On Demand library. I checked to see if I had a Showtime folder, and then checked to see if they had all of the Penny Dreadful episodes, and just as I got excited about that, Netflix also added the series, although only the first two seasons.

It was suddenly abundantly available and so I put on the first one this morning while working, and that rolled right into the second one, and all of a sudden, there was Eva Green, and there was this seance, and she grabbed this script by the neck and cracked it open and drank the marrow and never once blinked, damn near staring the audience down, daring them to look away.

That’s Eva Green, though. From the moment she appeared in The Dreamers thirteen years ago, she made it clear that she was no one’s fantasy, no one’s object, no one’s simple fantasy. She is willing to follow a good piece of material anywhere, and watching her tear into good writing is one of the great pleasures of film these days. When I spoke to her about her work in 300: Rise Of An Empire, I was practically levitating because it’s such a knowing, accomplished piece of work. She read that script, she got exactly how to make that character spring to vivid life, and she dug in unabashedly. I don’t think Sin City: A Dame To Kill For is very good, but she positively skins it. She leans into the stereotypes that Frank Miller’s using and she twists them all into her own particular versions of them. When she played “the Bond girl” in Casino Royale, she ended up making Vesper into something just as morally and emotionally complicated as the original Ian Fleming conception of the character, if not more so.

Tim Burton’s Dark Shadows has 99 problems, but Eva Green ain’t one. She showed up to that film to play, and she owns Johnny Depp in every scene in the film. Seems apt. In a world where men get to be character actors for decades, building rich galleries of portrayals of a wide range of types and voices and backstories, women are often relegated to teasing out variations on a fairly limited range of roles. Eva Green has never allowed herself to be held back by that, though, and when a filmmaker understands just what a rich collaborator Green can be, it seems like there’s no limit to the rewards that the finished film will reap. She should have the kind of career Depp has, and it seems like she is forcing the industry to bend to that idea instead of her having to give up and just take the girlfriend or wife roles like everyone else.

Today is her birthday, and I don’t particularly care what number it is. What I care about is watching the rest of this series in the weeks ahead, and savoring the way a TV show, especially today as the caliber of writing seems to have risen across the board, allows a great actor to do something they can never do in film, living in a character’s skin over time, building in a million details that make the character even more vivid, even more real. And if I could give her one birthday present, it would be the promise that no one will ever do to her work what Ridley Scott did when he cut the theatrical version of Kingdom Of Heaven in 2005. Her character had a son in the film who played an essential role, but when Scott was pushed to create a theatrical version of the film that was an acceptable length, he chose to cut her son from the movie completely, and it destroyed her character in a way that was remarkable. It was only once I saw the longer cut that I realized just how impressive her work was, and how much William Monahan had given her to do. Here’s hoping that as she continues to move from role to role, filmmakers rise to the challenge and they write strong, smart, eccentric roles for her to play. I’m looking forward to seeing her play Miss Peregrine in Tim Burton’s Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children, and you can see the latest trailer for it below. But I want more for her. I want her to conquer. I want her to find a filmmaker who is excited by what she brings to a collaboration. I want Hollywood to deserve her.

In the meantime, I’ve got lots more Penny Dreadful to get to. Celebrate her birthday right and join me if you’re also been missing out.

Source

G   /   June 23, 2016   /   1 Comment

Charlotte Rampling is set to join the cast of Euphoria, alongside Alicia Vikander and Eva Green, who were previously announced by Deadline. Vikander is also producing the pic through her newly-launched production banner Vikarious Productions. She is partners in Vikarious with her London-based agent Charles Collier, a partner in Tavistock Wood. The two of them have been driving the production forward, also bringing on-board esteemed DP Rob Hardy, who previously worked with Vikander on Ex Machina and Testament of Youth.  Shooting starts early August in the German Alps. The story follows two sisters (Vikander and Green), in conflict traveling through Europe towards a mystery destination.

Euphoria is the English-language directorial debut of award-winning Swedish writer and director Lisa Langseth, who previously collaborated with Vikander on two Swedish-language titles, Pure and Hotell.  The film is a production with Sweden’s B-Reel Films’ Patrik Anderson and Frida Bargo. It is the first production from Vikarious, with Vikander and Collier launched on the eve of Cannes. The company plans to produce a further two titles at a similar budget to Euphoria within the next two years.

Read the rest of the official press release at the SOURCE.

G   /   May 06, 2016   /   0 Comments

By Stuart Jeffries

 

The star of gothic fantasy Penny Dreadful talks about the risks – and pleasures – of acting on the dark side

Only very beautiful women and, perhaps, motorcycle couriers can get away with leather trousers. Detective Saga Norén in The Bridge? Just about. Ronan Keating? Not so much.

These thoughts occur as I’m introduced to Eva Green at an apparently select members’ club in the gothic revival St Pancras Renaissance hotel in London. She’s wearing black boots, black leather trousers, tailored black singlet, has long, dyed-black hair and lots of black eye makeup.

“I am a vampire,” she laughs, as we retire to a sofa in a darkened corner, “and I never expose myself to the sun. I have very fine skin, you see.” She daily applies suncream (factor 30 or 50) under her makeup.

Green is drawn to the dark side in other ways. The 35-year-old French actor is in London to promote her role as gaunt, statuesque, demonically possessed, cheeks-sucked-in-so-much-it-must-hurt-after-a-hard-day’s-shooting clairvoyant Vanessa Ives in Sky series Penny Dreadful. The drama is a gothic mashup of Dracula, Dorian Gray, Frankenstein, steampunk aesthetics, vampires, werewolves, diabolical possession and obsolete alienist psychiatry. When I reviewed the first episode in 2014, I found it as impossible to take seriously as Ronan Keating in leather strides, notwithstanding all the impressive acting talent on show, including Rory Kinnear, Simon Russell-Beale, Helen McCrory, Billie Piper and Green herself. But the Victorian-set drama, whose third series starts this week, has since garnered decent ratings and won awards, so what do I know?

One day, Green whispers to me confidingly in husky, French-tinged, but nearly over-articulated English, she was in her trailer in Ireland. She was getting ready to film a scene in which Ives becomes demonically possessed and speaks in voices. In preparation, she was listening to a recording of the voice of a young German woman called Annaliese Michel. You can hear Michel’s ostensibly demonically possessed voice on YouTube, before she underwent Catholic exorcism rites in 1974. It is disturbing listening, and made all the more so thanks to hindsight: Michel died the following year, after which her parents and two priests were convicted of negligent homicide. “As I was listening to it,” says Green, “my makeup artist came in, heard these noises and said: ‘Oh my God, I’m getting out.’ And she ran off. I can understand why. It feels as if it’s contagious.”

G   /   May 06, 2016   /   1 Comment

by Roslyn Sulcas

 

As Vanessa Ives in the Showtime series “Penny Dreadful,” the French actress Eva Green has been possessed by demons, spoken in tongues, fallen in love with a werewolf and defied the Devil. What on earth can happen to her character next? Something scarier: therapy.

Yes, in Season 3, now underway, the impenetrable Miss Ives visits a “mentalist,” who bears a strange resemblance to a character from Season 2. “I always think, no, it can’t get darker,” said Ms. Green, who was nominated for a Golden Globe for the role. “But, well, you don’t know with this character whether it’s all in her head.”

The show, set in Victorian England, incorporates characters from classic British novels of the era — Dr. Frankenstein and his monsters, Dorian Gray and Dracula — to creepy, head-spinning ends. “I love playing a character from those repressed times who is so nonconformist, it’s very jubilating,” Ms. Green said. “Being possessed, sometimes, it’s very freeing.”

Ms. Green, 35, grew up in Paris and worked in theater before making her screen debut in 2003 in Bernardo Bertolucci’s “The Dreamers,” later appearing as the double agent Vesper Lynd in the 2006 James Bond movie, “Casino Royale.” Later this year, she will appear in Tim Burton’s “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children.”

In an interview at a hotel in London, Ms. Green, dressed all in black, was warm and, unlike Vanessa, smiled a lot. These are edited excerpts from the conversation.

When you were cast as Vanessa, did you know you’d have epic sequences of demonic possession — projectile vomiting and mowing down men and furniture?

I love all that! I prefer doing it to light stuff. There is something very physical about it, which is fun. But it’s true that it’s really intense, like a drug, or a sport. Sometimes, after shooting, I go home and lie on the sofa with a glass of red wine and can’t move.

Is it hard to speak in tongues in that scarily deep voice?

The first season, I was very serious about it. I learned some Latin, Arabic, German and Lingala, a Congolese dialect. But then some linguists created the Verbis Diablo for Season 2. I was very good for an episode. Then I just made it all up and took my voice down an octave or two.

French is your first language, but you’ve mostly worked in English.

I have only done one movie in French, and it was terrible. I’d love to do another, but I’m scared. Playing in another language means you get out of yourself somehow. I worked really crazily to sound British when I did the Bond movie, but I’m a nerd like that.

When did you decide you wanted to act?

I was very shy — I still am actually — and my school forced me to do a theater class when I was 12 because they thought it would be good for me. My mother was an actress, but she stopped when she had children, and she would always tell me it was a cruel business. I went to drama school but thought I wanted to become a director. Then I started to act and really felt alive. And here I am.

What are some of your career goals?

I would love to do something with Jacques Audiard [“Rust and Bone”]. I once wrote him a letter, but perhaps he doesn’t think I’m right. People often see me as sophisticated, or put me in the supernatural box.

What was it like to work with Tim Burton on “Miss Peregrine”?

He was really lovely. The film is about lots of strange children with unique characteristics, and I’m the guardian who protects them from the outside world. There is some darkness, but it’s very fanciful, crazy, with funny moments. It’s very poetic, very Tim.

What’s in store for Vanessa in Season 3?

Vanessa has lost her faith, but deep down there is a longing. She meets Dr. Sweet [a zoologist] in the first episode, and she will fall in love, but it’s weird. It’s a “Penny Dreadful” kind of relationship, what can I say?

 

Source

G   /   April 28, 2016   /   1 Comment

By Rebecca Nicholson

Eva Green has played a lot of witches. “Different kinds of witches,” says the French actor, sipping a dark red juice that looks, naturally, like a cup of blood. Tim Burton made her a blonde witch in his 2014 film Dark Shadows, and liked her so much that he cast her as the lead in his next film, Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children. She’s done indie films, arthouse films and blockbusters, was a Bond girl in the best Daniel Craig Bond Casino Royale and put in some serious action hero green-screen time with 300: Rise of an Empire and Sin City: A Dame to Kill For. If there’s a complicated woman who may have a murderous side, or a supernatural side, or both, then Eva is top of the list.

She’s suitably goth-like today, dressed entirely in black and speaking in such a whisper that it’s sometimes hard to hear her. She says ‘I don’t know’ before she gives an answer, almost every time; sometimes to deflect, if she doesn’t necessarily want to get into something, and sometimes because she often seems unsure of herself. She says she was desperately reserved as a kid. Actors do that ‘Don’t look at me I’m shy’ false modesty thing all the time, but with her, you can believe it.

Right now she’s putting her dark side through its paces in the third season of Penny Dreadful, in which she plays Vanessa Ives, a demon-hunting medium who was possessed by the devil and fell in love with a werewolf. This time she looks set to romance a suspiciously mysterious stranger, as well as going through some early form of proto-psychotherapy. We talked about how it feels to be Hollywood’s go-to goth and why everyone expects her to take her clothes off on screen.

VICE: I just saw the first episode of Penny Dreadful season three.
Eva Green: Oh god. I haven’t seen it. I am not good at watching myself.

So what do you do when you have premieres and things like that? Do you just leave?
Yeah, actually it’s funny, I was thinking about it this morning on the train. Most of the time it’s OK but then one director, I won’t mention his name, took it really, really badly that I couldn’t stay. I stayed for the first 10 minutes then I had to leave. I just can’t… I don’t know, it’s weird.

Because you’re scrutinising yourself?
Yeah. It’s too subjective. It’s negative narcissism. It’s not good. I wish I could. Some actors can [watch themselves and] improve. I can’t.

M.   /   April 27, 2016   /   1 Comment

Penny Dreadful – The all-new Victorian horrors coming your way in the third season of the hit show.

In addition to Jekyll, season three will introduce another physician pulled from the pages of Victoriana – Bram Stoker’s Dr Seward played (in a bit of gender reversal) by veteran actress Patti LuPone. As therapist to Eva Green’s Vanessa Ives, Seward is tasked with overseeing the enigmatic medium’s mental reconstruction in the wake of season two’s narrowing events.

(…)

“The thing about Dr Seward is she’s trying desperately to help Vanessa, but she’s a woman of science. So the idea of the supernatural and the occult are things that for her aren’t necessarily grounded in reality. But eventually she comes around to understanding who Vanessa is, and who is behind all of the darkness inside her.”

LuPone appeared in season two of Penny Dreadful as the now deceased witch Joan Clayton (aka the Cut-Wife). But “when the idea of creating someone who helped Vanessa came up, John said, ‘I have to have Patti back.’ It’s revealed throughout the season that perhaps she has some sort of blood relation with Joan Clayton, with the Cut-Wife, so you’ll come to understand why the same actor is playing two different roles.”

GALLERY LINKS:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > SFX (UK) – July 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Glamour (Brazil) – April 2016 –> scanned by Priscilla
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > TV Guide – April 18-May 1, 2016

M.   /   March 24, 2016   /   3 Comments

GALLERY LINK:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Grazia (Italy) – March 30, 2016

M.   /   March 05, 2016   /   1 Comment

GALLERY LINK:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Entertainment Weekly (USA) – March 11, 2016

Stef   /   March 01, 2016   /   0 Comments

GALLERY LINK:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2014 > Soul (Greece) – June/July 2014

Stef   /   March 01, 2016   /   0 Comments

Wim Goossens of Bulletproof Cupid, a film production company, provided the production services when the Tim Burton film Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children came to shoot for three weeks in Flanders last summer.

GALLERY LINK:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Screen Flanders (Belgium) – 2016

M.   /   January 10, 2016   /   2 Comments

Eva Green and her mother, former actress and author Marlène Jobert (with over 20 million copies sold, she’s only behind J.K. Rowling when it comes to children’s books in France), are featured in Vanity Fair Italy. Ms Jobert was interviewed about her autobiography, her life, her family and her career.

The main photo was published by Paris Match back on November 6, 2014, but the interview is brand new.

GALLERY LINK:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Vanity Fair (Italy) – January 20, 2016

G   /   January 04, 2016   /   1 Comment

Eva Green feels more like herself when she’s ditched her natural hair colour.

The 34-year-old actress is a natural blonde, but usually sports much darker tresses. That’s been the way for many years, with Eva explaining she feels brunette suits her personality much better, so has stuck with in since first reaching for the dye at 15.

“I wanted to change something. You know, like when you go through your teenage years. I hated school. I was a good student, but I just wanted to breathe in something new,” she told WWD. “I was in awe of a friend of my mum, who had dark hair. She was quite weird, beautiful. I was like, ‘Oh wow, I’ll go to the hairdresser and try that.’ So I went there, I dyed my hair blue-black and came back home. It took me a while to get used to it, and then I actually really liked it. I felt more like myself. It’s weird.”

Eva was talking as part of her role as L’Oréal Professionnel international spokesperson. The brand is releasing a new range called Pro Fiber, which aims to help repair damaged hair.

It’s something the star can get on board with because she’s changed her look a lot for roles, including sporting red tresses and experimenting with fringes.

“Hair defines your character, your state of mind. At the moment I’m in a [Tim] Burton film, and it took weeks and weeks to find the right hairdo. It’s kind of a weird character. Her name is Miss Peregrine, so there is a bit of a birdlike hairdo in her. It helps you to create the character when you find the hairdo. It’s also like a costume,” she said.

The actress was also quizzed on her beauty secrets and was happy to let a couple slip. Unfortunately, there is no quick route to her slim physique and porcelain skin – it’s all about being careful.

“Sun cream, protection, food — what we eat is the most important: lots of green vegetables, raw vegetables, organic. Everything has to be organic,” she said.

 

Source

G   /   December 07, 2015   /   2 Comments

Eva Green loves extreme shades when it comes to her hair.

The former Bond girl is known for her striking looks and raven hair. Her natural colour is actually dark blonde which the 35-year-old has always found dull so she likes to experiment – but has had some mishaps along the way.

“I’ve dyed my hair black since I was 15. One of my mum’s friends had very dark hair and blue eyes and I just thought, ‘OK, I have to try it!'” she told British InStyle. “I felt more like myself after I made the colour change. I love extreme shades – I’ve been dark blue, a dark brown and even red at one point. That was a challenging shade because it eventually went green!”

One colour Eva would love to try is bright blonde. But just like Kim Kardashian, who had to give up her platinum locks after only a few weeks earlier this year, the actress thinks it would be too much strain on her tresses.

“I’ve done movies with a blonde wig and I’d love to go blonde. But colourists say it would destroy my hair because of how much I’d have to bleach it,” she explained. “My hair got very damaged because it’s super straight and I always use tongs to give it texture. I’ve just had the new L’Oréal Professionel Pro Fibre Revive in-salon treatment – it makes your hair shiny and healthy.”

Eva likes to be experimental when it comes to her make-up looks too, although it wasn’t always the case.

“I was shy until I was 16 and started at the American School of Paris. It was a chance to be a new me,” she said. “I had new black hair and would match my eyeshadow with my clothes so I’d wear purple or green. It was very theatrical.”

Source

G   /   November 04, 2015   /   1 Comment

Eva Green is like a vampire because she has to be so careful in the sun.

The 35-year-old actress has completely embraced her ultra pale skin, which means she goes to great lengths to protect it. Even when there is no threat of sun she slathers on sun protection as she knows how sensitive her skin can be.

“I’m like a vampire. I have to wear sunscreen or I look like a prawn! Even in winter I wear SPF30 – Skinceuticals Brightening UV Defence SPF30 and La Roche-Posay Anthelios Face Anti-Shine Dry Touch Gel SPF50+ are my favourites. It’s easier to apply make-up over the top of SPF30 than 50, which can be thick,” she told British magazine InStyle. “I have thin, fragile skin so I’m not a big fan of exfoliating and I don’t tend to get facials either.”

That’s not the only way the French star cares for herself. She’s also very particular about what she will and won’t eat, something she thinks many other people could learn from her.

“My diet is very LA; I eat mainly organic food. The amount of pesticides in our food is outrageous and so many people aren’t aware of what they’re eating,” she explained. “I drink lots of juices and eat kale, and have loads of energy as a result. I’m reading a great book by Dr Joel Fuhrman called Super Immunity about how you can cure all sorts of diseases with food.”

Alongside this, Eva works out regularly. For her exercise it’s just about keeping her body lean though, it’s more how it cares for her wellbeing that she likes.

“I run outside to help with my nerves. It’s a good way to get rid of your demons. Gyms are a bit depressing. You feel like a hamster on a wheel,” she said.

 

Source