Archive for the ‘Article’ Category
G   /   August 21, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Rob Lowman

 

Eva Green is striking as she walks into the room. The actress is wearing a form-fitting black lace dress. Her wrist and hands are adorned with shiny bracelets and large rings, including one of a skull.

As we sit and talk, though, it’s Green’s mysterious eyes that capture your attention. A sultry stare also comes in handy for “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” from writer-directors Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller. Like the first “Sin City,” it is based on Miller’s graphic novels. Green plays the twisted femme fatale Ava Lord in the film, which opens Aug. 22.

 A penetrating gaze also informed her character, Vanessa Ives, in the recently completed first season of Showtime’s “Penny Dreadful.” In the sophisticated horror series set in Victorian England, Green is an enigmatic medium who at times is possessed by strange spirits.

“She’s phenomenal — the fulcrum of the piece. She’s a ferociously committed actor,” says “Penny Dreadful” creator John Logan, the Tony Award-winning playwright and screenwriter of “Gladiator” and “Skyfall” who spent six months wooing Green for the role.

 “A TV series requires quite an important commitment and that was my fear,” says the 34-year-old French-born actress. “But Vanessa is such an amazing role with so many colors to play.”

The first season of “Penny Dreadful” gave Green a number of showcase moments. In the second episode, Vanessa is at a séance when she is suddenly controlled by several demons. It’s a riveting scene that goes on for five or six minutes, during which the actress becomes several different people.

As Ava Lord in “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For,” Green also had some of those turn-on-a-dime and become another person scenes. The trick to doing them, she says, is “not going over the top — that and the transitions, of course.”

“Ava plays the damsel in distress but she is also kind of a bitch,” adds Green, who appears almost shy and reserved. “The challenge to that was making her believable because she’s lying all the time.”

Rodriguez says Green was the only person that he and Miller could agree on to play Ava. “She pulls it off to where you go, ‘She’s a dame to kill for,’ ” he says.

In June, a poster for the film was banned by the Motion Picture Association of America “for nudity.” The graphic-comic stylized illustration shows the actress in a see-through white robe that emphasizes the curves of her figure. ABC also rejected a TV ad for the film because of Green’s sexy pose.

 When asked about it, she shakes her head. “I thought it was a joke when I heard. John Logan sent me an email when I was in Hungary and asked, ‘What’s up with this?’ I’m not sure why people objected,” she says. “You sort of guess the outline of the boob. I am holding a gun, though, and no one questions that. It’s all about nothing really.”

There is a fair amount of nudity in “A Dame to Kill For,” which is in 3-D, but the actress is no stranger to that. She made her film debut in Bernardo Bertolucci’s sensuous coming-of-age film “The Dreamers” (2003). Set against the backdrop of the 1968 Paris student riots, it tells the story of three young people and their sexual experimentation.

 Green actually grew up in Paris. Her father is Swedish. Her French mother is Marlène Jobert, an actress who worked with Jean-Luc Godard and Louis Malle, two of France’s greatest New Wave directors. Interestingly, before being cast in “The Dreamers,” the actress had a poster on her wall of Bertolucci’s most notorious film, “Last Tango in Paris” (1972), starring Marlon Brando, which made waves because of its sexual content.

In 2005, another heavyweight director, Ridley Scott, cast her in his Crusades epic, “Kingdom of Heaven.” The next year found her in the re-launch of the James Bond franchise in “Casino Royale” as the sexy but strong Vesper Lynd, a female to match Daniel Craig as the newly minted 007.

 Though Green now bases herself in London, she says it was that film that accounts for her English accent.

“I had a lot of pressure when making it, actually. The studios were insistent that Vesper had to be British. So I worked night and day on my accent with a coach,” Green says. “And I still work on it because of certain intonations or tendencies. I’m kind of a geek that way. I love languages and working on accents. It helps with building a character.”

Along with her film career, Green has appeared in a number of fashion ads for the likes of Armani, Lancôme, Emporio Armani, Montblanc and Dior, among others. I ask her to show me the large rings she is sporting. “It’s like my armor,” she jokes. “These two are from a Russian designer that I’m very fond of, and this one’s from Morocco, and this I’ve had since the age of 15, which is a long time,” she says, pointing to the silver skull.

 Green was planning to talk with Logan the next day about the second season of “Penny Dreadful,” which starts shooting in Dublin in September.

“It’s a luxury to work with him because I can go, ‘Do you mind if we cut that?’ Or, ‘I wish we had more complexity there.’ And he like, ‘No problem.’ He is so gifted and open. I feel lucky.”

She wouldn’t give any hints where her character might go in the 10-episode second year. “I think John would cut off my head.” But she would say: “It won’t be the same. It’s not like, here she goes again. She’s going on another journey.”

 As if she’s not busy enough, Green recently signed on to shoot “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children,” which Tim Burton will direct. The two had previously worked together on “Dark Shadows” (2012). She plays the title character, a guardian of a group of orphans with special powers.

As far as roles are concerned, Green prefers complexity, but says, “I don’t want to be typecast with people thinking ‘She is just dark and a femme fatale.’ A good comedy might be simpler, maybe. I don’t know. I like complex. So we’ll see.”

 As intense as the roles she takes on might be, don’t think Green spends all her time brooding. “I can get out of the character really quickly and have fun with the crew,” she says.

Since the actress describes herself as a quiet homebody type, it’s curious as to why she’s attracted to such strong and fearsome roles.

“I don’t know. I should ask a therapist,” she says with a small smile. “It’s kind of liberating for me to play kind of evil people because I’m so not like that in real life. You know, I’m not too confident. So it’s just kind of fun.”

 

Source:  Los Angeles Daily News

G   /   August 18, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Ethan Sacks

 

Eva Green bares more than her soul as the title femme fatale, while Rosario Dawson and Jessica Alba all have key action scenes; even Lady Gaga has a part as a conservatively dressed waitress.

“Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” was so green-screen heavy that cardboard boxes were used in place of cars on set, but one thing was completely genuine: Eva Green’s nudity.

As the titular vixen in the noir thriller opening Friday, the actress had to embody a woman so alluring, she drives men to murder. Green did a great job — even the revealing poster of her Ava Lord in a see-through-top has been banned. But ticket-buyers will get a much better view.

“Of course, as an actor you feel so silly being naked and you want to die, you just kind of become numb and you just do the scene,” Green, 34, tells the News. “And you know (director Robert Rodriguez) just has such taste and style that you are in good hands.

“I really think [being nude in the film is] not gratuitous, especially for my character who uses her body as a weapon. She uses men and her sexuality as part of it.”

Welcome back to Sin City, the boozy, bloody home of grifters and drifters, mobsters and molls. Like the 2005 original “Sin City,” the dark tales that make up the sequel are taken directly from the pages of Frank Miller’s iconic graphic novels.

But not everything is as black and white as it was the first time around. Now it’s the dames — like Rosario Dawson’s killer dominatrix — who dominate much of the R-rated flick’s action.

“There’s a lot of estrogen in this one,” says Jessica Alba, who reprises her role as the city’s erotic dancing muse, Nancy. “There’s very powerful women in this movie, and I think it’s so great because the misconception is that there can only be strong guys in this genre.”

A lot has changed for both Alba and her character in the nine years since the first “Sin City” was released. The last time around Nancy was a scared damsel in distress who danced away her insecurities for leering men in a bar — and the actress now says she felt just as self-conscious herself gyrating away.

Alba, 33, says she’s grown up a lot since, becoming a better actor and more importantly, a mother to two daughters , Honor Marie and Haven Garner. “I certainly feel that I’ve evolved as a person and an actress,” says Alba, “and I have [more] fearlessness as a performer after I had kids than I did prior to having kids.”

So she wanted Nancy, now an alcoholic out to avenge the murder of the only man she ever loved, to show the same type of growth, choreographing her sexy dances for months before cameras rolled and running around firing CGI crossbow bolts into the heads of her enemies.

“Being able to play a character that starts off being this kind of 

victim who’s an innocent naive girl … and then to see her take her destiny into her own hands and avenge him and become this warrior was so cool,” says Alba.

Dawson’s Gail practices feminism of the more blunt variety — as in leading a group of violent vixens who dish out blunt-force trauma to male evil-doers. But the New York-born actress says it’s not as revolutionary a concept in a traditionally macho genre as it looks.

“I love watching old noir films,” says Dawson, 35. “There were some amazing, multilayered roles for women like Bette Davis. Hollywood has really dropped the ball and taken them away since…and we’re kind of bringing that back again.”

Davis, though, never wore a leather S&M-tinged outfit like the one Gail sports through the movie, more practical for showing off a backside than for buttkicking.

Dawson finds it amusing that in a film where Lady Gaga has a cameo as a fairly conservatively dressed waitress, she’s the one trussed up like Lady Gaga. But Dawson’s costume really helped her “get” the character.

“I remember when my first doll came out from the first film, with a dominatrix outfit, handcuffs and an Uzi,” says Dawson, laughing. “She is that person. She lives and breathes that. I love that. Everything about her screams.”

For Green, who comes off much more demure in real life than in reel life, her “Dame to Kill For” is the most evil character she’s ever played. That says a lot — since she’s previously chewed the scenery through nefarious parts in “300: Rise of the Empire,” “Dark Shadows” and the Starz series “Camelot.”

“To be so bad and irreverent is sort of fun, weirdly,” says Green. “Maybe because I’m not like this in real life, to embrace it fully and to be so bad, it’s just fun.”

 

Source: New York Daily News

G   /   August 18, 2014   /   2 Comments

By Alice Howarth

 

She became a household name after playing Casino Royale‘s Bond girl in 2006, but now French-born actress Eva Green is courting both new audiences and controversy as she takes on her biggest role yet. Playing femme fatale Ava Lord in the upcoming Sin City sequel, Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For, Green’s teaser poster and trailer was banned in America earlier this month after it was deemed “too sexy” for the nation’s audiences. As the star gears up for her vixen to be unleashed on screen, she talks to GQ about the films she watched to prep for the role, who she’d like to work with next, and why men should never, ever wear cologne…

GQ: What’s the most sinful thing you’ve ever done?
Eva Green: Woah. I can’t tell you [laughs]! I’m a good girl, I’m very wise and a good girl. I was very serious in school.

Do you think the Motion Picture Association of America was too harsh when it banned your ad?
I think so, I mean the film is very beautiful, it’s very artistic. It’s not vulgar at all, it’s actually very decent so I didn’t really understand what all the fuss was about but at least it’s publicity, people will hear about it I guess.

You said that when you were in drama school you “picked the really evil roles [as it’s] a great way to deal with your everyday emotions.” How did you get into character playing a violent, gold digging, vixen?
I watched a lot of film noir. Double Indemnity with Barbara Stanwyck, other films with Bette Davis. Ava Lord is a very extreme femme fatale, she’s really very jaded, she manipulates men, she feels empowered and smarter when she does it, she’s incredibly full-on – nothing is sacred. The main thing is to have fun with those kind of characters. She’s so free and corrupt, she’s just bonkers. It really was so fun to play.

The film features a lot of lingerie. What would be your advice to men buying their girlfriends lingerie as gifts?

I wear a lot of corsets in the movie and I think it’s very sexy, kind of retro and very classy, I think men should definitely buy those.

 What should no man have in his wardrobe?

You know what, I don’t really like perfume. I know it’s not clothing but I prefer when men don’t wear it. I don’t like cologne. It’s as if they’re hiding something. I like perfume as it works on a woman, but on a man they lose something, their manliness. It’s less… animal.

Can you recommend a good book?
Yes. I recently read The Shadow of the Wind by the Spanish writer Carlos Ruiz Zafón. It was a beautiful story and a great book to read on holiday. Very romantic.

Where would you recommend a friend to eat in London?
Definitely St. John’s Bread & Wine on Commercial Street in Shoreditch.

How did you find working on a green-screen stage forSin City 2: A Dame To Kill For?
At first you’re very overwhelmed but then you really get used to it. You know that Robert [Rodriguez, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For co-director] and Frank [Miller, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For co-director] are going to do amazing things post filming. To have real actors to act with is always the main thing when making a movie so that was fun and the atmosphere on set was really gentle, laid back and just incredibly fun.

You’ve called Ava “multidimensional”. Are there any sides of her character that you admire?
She’s very brave, if she wants something she’ll get it no matter who gets hurt. She’s obsessed with money and power. She doesn’t apologise about her behavior and in that sense sometimes I wish I could be a bit more like that. But she does take it to the extreme, because people die for her so I wouldn’t want that, but to have her power would sometimes be helpful.

You’ve said in the past you’d like to go back to the theatre as Hollywood is likely to typecast you as a femme fatale. Were you nervous then about playing the biggest femme fatale of the moment?
No. It depends what the role is, what the project is. With Sin City I didn’t even think twice about it. It’s so fun, she’s quite funny because she’s so extreme, it’s very pleasant to play someone like that. Of course, I don’t want to be typecast as a dark femme fatale my whole life but you know I play Penny Dreadful who is very different from Ava Lord, and I’m about to do another film with Tim Burton, whose character is also very different. I’m not typecast at the moment.

With a cast of beautiful women including Jessica Alba, Rosario Dawson and Jamie Chung was there any female rivalry on set?
Well actually we didn’t meet. They were all finished when I arrived and I arrived last on board. But I met them separately for publicity and they’re lovely girls and they’re really not competitive at all. I just wish I had had some scenes with them. I only had scenes with men, all men [laughs].

Who would you most like to work with next?
There’s so many but I love Matthew McConaughey, I think he’s really intentioned and so interesting. I would also love to work with Marion Cotillard.

What’s next for you?
I’m about to start the second season of Penny Dreadful and then I’m going to start filming on Tim Burton’s new film in February, so I’m going to be busy.

 

Source: GQ (UK)

M.   /   August 17, 2014   /   1 Comment

The former Bond Girl and Penny Dreadful star on how acting helps her overcome shyness, why she’s naughty healthwise and why she swapped Paris for London.

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Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > Hello! (UK) – August 18, 2014

G   /   August 17, 2014   /   1 Comment

Eva Green likes wearing black because it takes away any wardrobe mishaps.

The 34-year-old actress enjoys dressing up as the characters she plays in movies like Sin City: A Dame to Kill For and 300: Rise of an Empire, plus it’s fun to don expensive things to promote her flicks. But while she’ll make an effort for the red carpet, out of the limelight it’s a different story altogether.

“I’m very casual and I like comfort, so I live in jeans and T-shirts. I like to wear black because I don’t have to think about it in the morning,” she told British magazine Hello! “I’m not a girly girl spending hours putting on make-up. When I do press or red carpet events, I have great hair and make-up people to make me look glamorous. That can be fun, like a little girl playing dress-up. But for most of the time, I’m too lazy.”

While she might not pay too much attention to fashion, Eva is clear about her health and fitness goals. Unfortunately she doesn’t have any tips to make the process of staying in shape any easier, but does warn that there’s no need to deprive yourself from tasty things all the time.

“It’s very boring but you have to drink lots of water and eat lots of vegetables. I am supposed to do this as an actress because we have to watch out for our bodies but I am very naughty and don’t do it enough,” she laughed.

Source: Yahoo

G   /   August 14, 2014   /   3 Comments

Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller’s cinematic “Sin City,” based on Miller’s comic book series of the same name, is a place populated almost exclusively by criminals, lowlifes and corrupt public officials. It’s the kind of place that is perpetually rain-soaked and blood-splattered. And in the new sequel, “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For,” things get even more sinful thanks to the addition of the titular dame, played by Eva Green, who basically slinks her way through her section of the movie (once again, the narrative has been diced into bite-sized vignettes). Green is so sexy, in fact, that she’s been causing a commotion with the movie’s marketing — first a poster was banned due to Green’s, er, voluptuousness and now a TV spot has been supposedly pulled from NBC because it’s just too darn sexy.

The spot, obviously, focuses on Green’s section of the movie (which, coincidentally enough, is also called “A Dame to Kill For”). In this section, Josh Brolin plays Dwight (which, confusingly, is a character portrayed by Clive Owen in the first “Sin City”), a small time hood who makes his money by taking photos of important men in compromising positions. (In one moment in the spot, you can see him peeping on Ray Liotta’s character, who is caught with Juno Temple.) The TV spot does some nifty things, comparing Brolin’s character to his comic-book incarnation and adding some comic book-like text to the screen.

But the thing that has gotten the clip in hot water is the appearance of Green, who plays a supposed damsel in distress who turns out to be a lot more trouble than she’s worth. In one scene, her nipples are very clearly visible (so I’m not quite sure how this was ever intended to air on television, even in the late night slots allotted for advertisements of R-rated movies), but considering what percentage of Green’s performance is comprised of her prancing around totally naked, it is but a fleeting moment.

Whatever the intent behind the spot (and whatever its reasons for getting yanked), it’s a super cool clip for a super cool movie (that we’re not allowed to talk about — but trust us, it is!) When “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” rolls out on August 22nd, you can expect similarly vampy performances by almost everyone involved, including Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Rosario Dawson, Bruce Willis, Jessica Alba, Mickey Rourke, and Powers Boothe. And be sure to check back next week, for interviews with the cast and crew and our review of the film. It’s going to be sinfully good!

 

Source: MovieFone

M.   /   August 13, 2014   /   3 Comments

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Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > VSD N 1928 (France) – August 7-13, 2014

G   /   August 12, 2014   /   1 Comment

Eva Green isn’t religious, but believes in the supernatural.

The 34-year-old actress stars as a spiritualist in TV series Penny Dreadful, which is about a group of people who battle supernatural threats in London, UK. It’s got her thinking about what might be out there, with Eva adamant humans aren’t alone.

“There are forces, yes – I’m not religious but I believe there is something other,” she told British magazine Hello! “One of my friends is a psychic. She doesn’t talk about it because people might think she’s crazy but she has visions and has told me some interesting things about my own life.”

It’s not just spooky things which gives the French actress the shivers. Eva is also terrified of trying out for film and TV roles, which thinking about the state of the world can get her down too.

“Auditions! Lots of things frighten me: nasty people; ruthlessness in the world; oh and flying – I’m terrible at it,” she sighed.

To counteract her feelings of fear, Eva has a few hobbies which keep her chilled. Some of them developed from childhood and she still finds it relaxing to visit the places she’d frequent with her loved ones. Plus she’s added a few more tips into the mix.

“To go for long walks in the mountains, especially Switzerland. I’ve always loved mountains – I went to them with my family when young. The contact with nature makes me feel human. And pampering myself afterwards with a massage is the best treat,” she explained.

Source: Belfast Telegraph

G   /   August 08, 2014   /   2 Comments

By Russell Holly

 

Our next dive into the violent, sexy, and visually arresting world of Sin City is right around the corner, and to help get you ready to temporarily exchange color for carnage we spent a few minutes with Eva Green to talk about what it was like to be A Dame to Kill For.

Much like the first film, Sin City: A Dame to Kill For takes us into Frank Miller’s epic neo-noir comic series. The upcoming film explores multiple comic book arcs in order to make a whole movie, but there’s a clear focus on Miller’s second comic book arc. In the comics, Dwight McCarthy finds himself finally moving away from all of the dark things in Sin City that pull you in and make you bad just as his old flame comes back into his life and sends him on a crash course down to the bottom. Ava Lord, who we learn later is the title dame, turns out to be the perfect combination of temptress and monster. With her history of playing dark characters, it sounds like Eva Green was perfect to play the role.

So, what was it like playing Ava Lord?

Eva Green: She’s such an extreme character. Very forlorn, a real femme fatale. A man-eater, enchantress, kind of a chameleon who can kind of change her skin and become what men desire. She has all these women insider here, so it was kind of fun to play all these women and to be kind of the damsel in distress, the princess, the goddess, the bitch. It was fun.

She’s a dark character across all of that, not just when she needs to be. You get the feeling that she’s just always this dark person.

Eva Green: She is dark. I mean, she is like 200% so dark. Her heart is so cold and hard, and you wonder what happened in her past to make her like that. Maybe she was born like that, just completely bonkers. I’ve played evil characters but that one is, yeah, pretty full on dark.

Sin City is this incredibly visual experience for the viewers, because it’s so black and white with these flashes of color. What is that experience like on your side of the lens?

Eva Green: I knew the first Sin City, so I knew it was in good hands and it would look really cool. But it’s true, I mean there’s green screen and then there’s green screen. I’ve done green screen before but here we had no furniture, no doors, no walls. There were a lot of scenes where it was just me and the other person in the scene, which is fine. It’s fun when you can use your imagination, but really when you have another actor in front of you that’s all that matters.

In preparation for the role, did you read any of the comics or anything?

Eva Green: I only read A Dame To Kill For. I knew that Frank and Robert had used it as a storyboard, and that they were going to be very faithful to that. Reading it helped so I knew what would be surrounding me. You have to bring your own flesh to the role, though. It was nice to see how she was moving and it helped a lot to embrace Frank’s vision. I tried my best, anyway.

 

Source: Geek

G   /   August 07, 2014   /   4 Comments

By Eric Spitznagel

 

The U.S. has come a long way in the last decade. Same-sex marriage is now legal in 19 states. Medical marijuana is legal (with a “note from your doctor”) in 23 states. But if there’s one thing we still have no tolerance for, it’s lady nipples. Even worse if those nipples belong to a French seductress like Eva Green, ass-kicking star of blockbusters like Casino Royale and 300: Rise of an Empire.

A poster for her new film, Sin City: A Dame to Kill For — in theaters August 22 — was banned by the MPAA for, in their words, the “curve of under breast and dark nipple/areola circle visible through sheer gown.” And then a commercial slated to air on ABC was pulled for more or less the same reason. Too much Eva Green nipplage.

Green recently said that boobs “have never killed anyone” (though she did add that suffocation is a possibility). I called up Green recently, and she talked quite a bit more about the controversy — and about her obsession with stuffed dead animals.

ESQUIRE.COM: I have a lot to ask you about Sin City, but we should probably start by talking about taxidermy.

EVA GREEN: I’m sorry?

ESQ: I heard that you’re a repeat customer at Deyrolle in Paris, the taxidermy shop.

EG: [Laughs.] Oh yes, yes, that’s right.

ESQ: I was there decades ago, when I was doing the backpacking-across-Europe thing. The place is insane.

EG: It’s a very beautiful shop. It’s like being in a fairy tale or something.

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G   /   August 05, 2014   /   4 Comments

By Natalie Finn

Eva Green does not get the fuss.

“I mean…the poster, you don’t see anything!” the French actress exclaimed to E! News, her response in a nutshell to the hullabaloo over what was deemed to be a too-sexual teaser image for the upcoming sequel Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, featuring Green’s Ava Lord in a flimsy white robe, gleaming pistol in hand.

The none-too-subtle hint at what’s underneath Green’s robe was considered too naughty for public display by the Motion Picture Association of America, prompting Dimension Films to release an edited version of the poster. ABC later refused to air the trailer that was initially made for broadcast because Green “appear[ed] to be naked.”

“Just wait for the movie then. It’s in 3-D as well. Enjoy yourself, you know!” Green said, laughing. “It was nothing on the poster, it was lots of noise for nothing.”

She marveled over how the violence in the film, implied by her brandishing a weapon, was fun with the MPAA but the hint at nudity was being censored.

“I’m holding a gun on the poster—no big deal about the gun, it’s all about my t-ts?!”

 

Source: E! Online

 

G   /   August 05, 2014   /   4 Comments

By Claudia Canavan

The gorgeous Sin City 2 actress talks her favourite restaurant, wine, and what you should be wearing.

Sultry blue eyes, Bond girl pedigree and a recent US ban for an overly sexy film poster: it’s no wonder Eva Green is a woman we love.

Her latest incarnation, as Ava Lord in Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For, might just be her most impressive role yet, as she takes on mantle of the ultimate femme fatale in Frank Miller’s graphic novel sequel.

We caught up with the French native to get her thoughts on London, wine, and what she thinks you should be wearing.

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G   /   August 05, 2014   /   0 Comments

By Jonathan Broxton

Penny Dreadful is a Gothic horror/drama series on the American Showtime network, set in Victorian London at the turn of the 19th century. Taking inspiration from the classic writings of Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker, Oscar Wilde and others, as well as the “penny dreadful” magazines which told lurid tales of serial killers, highwaymen and cowboys, creator John Logan re-imagined these classic characters in a new setting, interacting with each other, and working together to defeat an ancient evil. The story follows Ethan Chandler (Josh Hartnett), a charming American gunslinger sojourning in the motherland, who is recruited by the mysterious Vanessa Ives (Eva Green) to help Sir Malcolm Murray (Timothy Dalton), a famed African explorer, rescue his daughter Mina, who he believes has been kidnapped by a vampire-like creature. Needing help of a medical nature, Sir Malcolm also obtains the help of Victor Frankenstein (Harry Treadaway), a brilliant young surgeon, who has a problem of his own: unknown to the others, Frankenstein has been conducting experiments involving death and resurrection, and one of his creations, the fearsome Caliban (Rory Kinnear) has come looking for his father…

The world is in a Golden Age of television at the moment. With massively popular shows such as Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad, House of Cards, Downton Abbey, True Detective, Homeland, Fargo and others airing to enormous critical acclaim, it is currently de rigeur for major movie stars to feature in episodic series where, before, working in TV was considered ‘slumming it’, a step down from theatrical motion pictures. Similarly, television music is undergoing a renaissance of its own, with composers like Bear McCreary, Ramin Djawadi, John Lunn, Nathan Barr and Jeff Beal re-defining the quality of TV scores, and in many cases rivaling the best film music in the 2010s. Now you can add Abel Korzeniowski’s sumptuous music for Penny Dreadful to that list. Korzeniowski has slowly but surely been making a name for himself over the past few years as a composer to be reckoned with, him having received Golden Globe nominations for his scores for A Single Man and W.E. in 2009 and 2011 respectively, and having been the recipient of significant critical acclaim for his work on Romeo & Juliet and Escape from Tomorrow last year.

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G   /   August 03, 2014   /   0 Comments

By Dave Lewis

For her part, Green added another deliciously over-the-top villainess to her resume (she recently stole the show as the baddie in “300: Rise of an Empire”). She said that in playing the duplicitous seductress Ava, it was a challenge to “still be believable and lie all the time…she’s so bad, so that was very fun. No conscience. No sense of right or wrong. She’s pretty evil.”

Rodriguez praised Green’s abilities, noting a scene in which she dupes a pair of cops into believing her innocence after attempting to murder someone close to her.

It’s been nearly a decade since “Sin City” hit theaters, but fans will soon be able to return to the seedy, crime-ridden cesspool known as Basin City in the upcoming “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For.” 

Dimension held a press conference earlier today with stars Jessica AlbaJosh BrolinEva Green and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, and co-directors Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller, where they discussed the sequel’s original storylines, green screen technique, the possibility of further “Sin City” yarns and Alba’s dance moves. 

Based on Miller’s Dark Horse Comics series, the sequel includes two chapters based on existing storylines — “A Dame to Kill For” and the brief “Just Another Saturday Night” — plus the original stories “The Fat Loss” (originally titled “Nancy’s Last Dance”) and “The Long, Bad Night.” 

It brings together characters seen in the first film — Alba as Nancy, Bruce Willis as Hartigan, Mickey Rouke as Marv, among others — along with some new faces, most notably Green as femme fatale Ava, Gordon-Levitt as the new character Johnny, and Brolin as Dwight (played by Clive Owen in the first film). 

Since the original 2005 film’s release, some actors have been replaced (Jamie Chung took over for Devon Aoki, while Dennis Haysbert stepped in for the late, great Michael Clarke Duncan).

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G   /   August 03, 2014   /   0 Comments

By Gregg Kilday

Fox has set a release date for Paper Towns, its adaptation of the 2008 novel by The Fault in Our Stars author John Green. The film reunites Fault‘s Nat Wolff with screenwriters Scott Neustadter andMichael H. Weber. Temple Hill’s Wyck Godfrey and Marty Bowen are producing.Paper Towns will hit theaters on July 31, 2015.

That release date had originally been slated for Tim Burton’s next movie, Peregrine’s Home for Peculiars, an adaptation ofRansom Rigg’s Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, which is just getting underway. Its release has been moved to March 4, 2016.

The studio also moved up Ridley’s Scott’sThe Martian, starring Matt Damon, from that March 4, 2016, date to the earlier date of Nov. 25, 2015.

In addition, the studio shifted the release date of George Tillman Jr.’s The Longest Ride, an adaptation of the novel byNicholas Sparks, by one week. The film, starring Scott Eastwood, Britt Robertson, Alan Alda, Oona Chaplin andJack Huston, will now be released April 10, 2015 (rather than April 3, 2015).

Source: The Hollywood Reporter