Archive for the ‘Article’ Category
G   /   August 27, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Alison Willmore

How the Sin City: A Dame to Kill For actress walked away with the year’s most macho sequels.

Most of the thrill of the original Sin City is gone in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez’s follow-up to their innovative 2005 graphic-novel adaptation, set in a stylized, digitally engineered world of black and white with splashes of color. The movie, which floundered at the box office when it debuted this past weekend, is just as intensely violent, lurid, and nihilistic as the first one, and this time, it’s in 3D, which lends an added oomph to its sometimes beautiful compositions. But Sin City: A Dame to Kill For is also stupefyingly — 100-plus minutes of just the climax of a story, everything turned up to 11, the characters so interchangeably hard-boiled that it can take a while to realize Josh Brolin is actually playing the same character Clive Owen did in the previous film.

It’s disappointing, except for the one thing Sin City: A Dame to Kill For does have that the first installment didn’t: a scene-stealing Eva Green, who, as Ava Lord, burns a giant hole in the center of the screen. In a movie in which Jessica Alba humps a stage and Mickey Rourke plucks out someone’s eyeball like he’s picking a particularly stubborn daisy, it’s not easy to be the center of attention, but Green easily dominates the gritty, gory affair. Her Ava is less femme fatale than dark deity, a goddess of self-destruction who men can’t help but cower in front of.

And Sin City: A Dame to Kill For isn’t the first hyper-macho Frank Miller sequel this year that Green’s walked away with — as Artemisia, the bloodthirsty villain in March’s 300: Rise of an Empire, she totally bowled over the indistinguishable muscly male lead (Sullivan Stapleton, if you’d forgotten). Ever since her 2003 debut alongside Michael Pitt and Louis Garrel in Bernardo Bertolucci’s racy The Dreamers and her 2006 stint as proto-Bond girl Vesper Lynd…

Green’s proven to be a little too much for Hollywood — too formidable for happily-ever-afters, too much presence to be a character actor, too beautiful to be ignored, and too…goth-y? But in 2014, Green’s been carving out a distinctive career for herself as the scariest and most intimidating of sex symbols, and it’s been awesome to watch.

Aside from that graphic-novel green-screen double feature, the Year of Eva Green has included the actress’s acclaimed turn as troubled psychic Vanessa Ives in Showtime’s Penny Dreadful, in which she shifts between serenely enigmatic, vulnerable, and terrifyingly animalistic. She’s also got upcoming roles as a “deliciously unhinged” mother (per Variety) in Gregg Araki’s White Bird in a Blizzard and a ferocious, mute outlaw’s wife in Kristian Levring’s Western The Salvation, both due out later this year. But it’s her parts in the Miller adaptations that particularly stand out, because they manage to feel subversive in an environment that’s almost toxically heavy on the testosterone.

Miller’s near-parodic odes to the toughest of tough guys can’t help but sideline their female characters — his stories are, underneath the blood and sweat, deeply romantic about the business of being masculine in the most archetypal of ways. The men might die for the women, seek solace in them, get them killed, and avenge them, but the women themselves are rarely the focus. And yet…as Artemisia and Ava, Green disrupts this pattern by refusing to be an object who is primarily gazed at or acted upon. In Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, she’s just as sexualized as her fellow female cast members (including Alba, Rosario Dawson, Jaime King, Jamie Chung, and Juno Temple), but she’s fully in control. When she goes to lure her ex Dwight (Brolin) back after leaving him years earlier to marry a rich man, she shows up nude, in his bed, serene in her certainty that she has him. Her sensuality’s presented as a weapon, and he’s resistant and resentful even as he gives in — and the sex scene, which is strenuously athletic and shot in silhouette, ends with him crouched at her feet, like she’s poised to bite his head off, praying mantis-style.

Ava barely bothers to play the victim, rolling her eyes at the ease with which she wins over one of the cops on the case (Christopher Meloni) by playing on his lust and protective instincts. Both Sin City movies do some ludicrous things in the name of “strong female characters” (like the women of Old Town, who are organized, armed, and impossibly tough, but not tough enough to move on from prostitution to more lucrative crime, and who, btw, also frequently have hearts of gold underneath the dominatrix gear). But Green plays Ava as someone who, while psychotic, is also thoroughly in charge, and who deflates some of the grandiosity the film invests in its male characters’ grand gestures of sacrifice and obsession.

Green’s even more fabulously bonkers as Persia’s ruthless top naval commander in 300: Rise of an Empire, now out on DVD and Blu-ray — sprawling on her throne at sea, manipulating Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro) into somehow transforming into a gilded giant, taking the heads of enemies and then making out with them. Artemisia is a survivor of prolonged violence who remakes herself into a fearsome warrior, and the film never really suggests her thirst for revenge is unfounded, making her feel at least as much antiheroine as antagonist.

Halfway through 300: Rise of an Empire, Artemisia and Themistocles meet for a parley that turns, natch, into more crazy sex. It starts with her grabbing his hair and leads to the two slamming each other into various surfaces around the ship before she tosses him out, leaving him stunned when he goes back to his colleagues. Artemisia’s desire, born out of how pleased she is to have found an opponent who can actually match her, drives the whole love-scene-as-battle-metaphor sequence, and it’s not suggested she’s giving up anything or losing stature because she chooses to act on it.

Artemisia is the lone woman in a world of men, but, as played by Green, she’s neither challenged because of this nor acting as just another one of the boys. She’s her own wild creation, unfettered but readily feminine, whether leaping into battle or donning an increasingly intense series of battle ball gowns (culminating in a dress that includes tasteful golden bone-spikes along the spine).

Green commits to her material, no matter how pulpy, which is why this cartoonishly outsized character, a highly fictionalized version of an actual historical figure, comes so vividly to life. She’s not simply hamming it up — she’s as soulful as she is scary.

Green’s so good in these two watered-down sequels that it’s easy to imagine her kept in similar roles going forward — brash, witchy, and doomed. There are worse things that could happen, but she really deserves more, and Penny Dreadful comes closest to showing her range, from demonic force to unguarded romantic lead. And even in the Showtime drama, her character’s formative moment involved the love of a man who couldn’t keep up with her. But being a force of nature shouldn’t condemn someone to wan roles.

Source: Buzzfeed

 

G   /   August 27, 2014   /   4 Comments

By Susan Wloszczyna

“Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” did little to add sizzle to the late-summer box office this past weekend after collecting a slim $6.5 million and dismissive reviews. But it’s not from lack of trying on the part of Eva Green. This casting addition to the stylized babes-brutes-and-bullets sequel based on Frank Miller’s lurid comic-book series steamed up more than a few critics’ 3-D glasses as Ava Lord, a diabolical emerald-eyed femme fatale who has a hard time keeping her clothes on.

“Pulp and noir were often built on the beautiful shoulders of such characters as Ava, and the main justification for seeing the film is to watch Eva Green claim membership in the pantheon of noir leading ladies,” writes Todd McCarthy in The Hollywood Reporter.  Adds Voice Media’s Amy Nicholson: “Eva Green is sexy, funny, dangerous and wild — everything the film needed to be — and whenever she’s not on screen, we feel her absence as though the sun has blinked off.”

Signature line:  “As charming as you are, Mr. Bond, I will be keeping my eye on our government’s money — and off your perfectly-formed arse.” – as feisty Bond girl Vesper Lynd, giving as good as she gets opposite Daniel Craig’s 007 in the 2006 version of “Casino Royale.”

Career peaks: Like Bridget Bardot in 1956’s “And God Created Woman,” Parisian-born Green, now 34, exploited her own siren-like sexuality and created a sensation as part of a semi-incestuous menage a trois in her 2003 film debut “The Dreamers.” At the time, director Bernardo Bertolucci described his discovery as being “so beautiful, it’s indecent.”

Ridley Scott chose her to play the sultry Sibylla, a married Jerusalem princess who has an affair with Orlando Bloom’s crusading knight in his 2004 medieval epic “Kingdom of Heaven.” (Alas, much of her role was excised including love scenes that were later restored in a director’s cut.) The film flopped domestically but did well overseas, turning Green into an international star.

She had a better chance of proving herself a more than capable actress as the rare woman who has gained the upper hand over James Bond in “Casino Royale.” Fans of the series cheered her arrival as double agent Vesper Lynd, who bewitches Craig’s 007 with her witty banter and exotic good looks; she’s that rare Bond girl who actually steals Bond’s heart.
Despite her contributions to reviving the franchise with a new actor driving the Aston Martin, Green languished for a while after a fleeting role as a witch queen in the 2007 fantasy “The Golden Compass.” She started to get back on track with an appearance as the villainous Morgan in the 2011 miniseries “Camelot” and as the seductive Angelique Bouchard who bedevils Johnny Depp’s Barnabas Collins in 2012’s “Dark Shadows.”
“Rolling Stone” declared 2014 as Green’s comeback year, and she certainly started it off with a bang as the Persian warrior Artemisia in “300: Rise of an Empire.” She delivered the sequel’s killer line, “you fight much harder than you f**k”  with relish and shook the multiplex rafters with her bruising bout of hate-sex with her Greek foe. In a change of pace, Green is one of the good guys for once as the Victorian-era clairvoyant Vanessa Ives on Showtime’s horror series “Penny Dreadful,” which has been renewed for a second season. And if anyone can rise out of the ashes of ”Sin City” deux and survive, it will be Green.

Biggest assets: The London-based knockout has been compared to the early Angelina Jolie and rightly so. Just like Jon Voight’s daughter, she grew up with an actress mother, Marlene Jobert, and shares Jolie’s knack for making sexy seem smart while standing out in genres usually dominated by men. Green is also a welcome throwback to when Hollywood knew what do with alluring yet dangerous females who refused to be victims.

But unlike Jolie, Green has maintained an air of mystery about her private life, characterizing herself as a reclusive nerd. “I like to stay home and read rather than go to a club or something,” she tells Rolling Stone. “I’m very shy. If I go out, I’m hugging the walls.”

Awards attention:  Won BAFTA’s Rising Star Award in 2007.
Biggest misfire:  Middling reviews and a domestic box office of only $70 million canceled plans to turn “The Golden Compass,”  which cost $180 million, into a franchise based on the literary trilogy “His Dark Materials.”  That meant that audiences would not see Green reprise her role as Sarafina Pekkala, who is more developed in the middle story, “The Subtle Knife.” The film, whose source was better known overseas, proved to be a hit in other countries with a worldwide take of $372 million (New Line Cinema sold the international rights to offset the budget).
Biggest problem: Green tends to be typecast as an intoxicating fatal attraction with an erotic hold over males in larger-than-life roles. That she’s so good in these parts is not necessarily a problem. It’s just that Hollywood is not known for going outside the box when making casting choices: repeating yourself is not the best way to get ahead. And while she is far from old, Green is at an age where she might be wise to diversify her choices.
Gossip fodder: Green is more of a tabloid target internationally – something she is used to after dealing with her mother’s fame — and is known as a fashion-forward celebrity. four four years until 2009 she dated New Zealand actor and star Marton Csokas after he played her royal husband in “Kingdom of Heaven.” They must still be friends, as Csokas also plays her ill-fated tycoon spouse in “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For.”
Career advice: Green needs a strong director who sees beyond her obvious attributes. She has name-checked more than few on her wish list over the years, including Danish envelope-pusher Lars von Trier, David O. Russell, Spike Jonze, Stephen Daldry and Michel Gondry. She was originally cast in 2005’s “The Constant Gardener,” but had to drop out – a shame since the role of an impassioned political activist led to Rachel Weisz’s supporting Oscar win and could have been a possible career-changer for Green. She also revealed to Rolling Stone that she would like to do “something funny.” In order to tempt her, she admits, “it would have to be a comedy that’s very sharp, and very black.”
What’s next? Green plays Shailene Woodley’s depressed, alcoholic mother who suddenly disappears one day in the Sundance coming-of-age thriller “White Bird in a Blizzard,” directed by indie fave Gregg Araki (Sept. 25). And she co-stars with superhot Mads Mikkelsen as a mute woman  embroiled in a revenge plot  in “The Salvation,” an intense western from Danish director Kristian Levring that premiered at Cannes this year.
Source: Indiewire

 

 

G   /   August 26, 2014   /   1 Comment

Much as she did with 300: Rise Of An Empire, however, Eva Green holds up the mid-section with great gusto. Pouting with just the right amount of vamp and camp, Green’s titular dame pushes this Sin City firmly into farce where it belongs. As a seductress extraordinaire, Green is having fun, which is more than can be said for the sour-faced fellows in her thrall. Watching her play the victim and thrust her head into the lap of the cop that comforts her is a pleasure only matched by the sight of her waiting by the phone for his call later that night (“About time,” she purrs). The fact she is nude while doing this is absolutely integral to the story, you understand; the film dips a whole star every time she’s off screen. 

– Ali Gray for The Shiznit, Review: Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

Green is breathtakingly villainous and captivating as the soulless woman driven by a greed that can never be satiated. In a cast of heavy-hitters who each dig into the task at hand with relish, Rourke and Green manage to breathe fire into and elevate otherwise straightforward characters and stories.

– Roth Cornet for IGN, Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame To Kill For Review

The filmmakers wisely hired the fearless, magnetic Eva Green to play—what else?—the delectably twisted femme fatale Ava, who offers up most of the aforementioned copious nudity. Reminiscent of Linda Fiorentino’s classic turn in the seedy suspenser The Last Seduction, and far more resourceful than the movie she’s in, Green’s Ava more than lives up to this picture’s subtitle.

– Jason Clark for Entertainment Weekly, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For (2014)

Appearing in her second Frank Miller adaptation of the year (after offering the most memorable scenes in the300 sequel), Green cements her scene-stealing credentials with a perfect femme fatale impersonation. Whether clothed or naked, she rivets the camera’s attention. Green shares the villain’s duties with Powers Boothe, who knows a thing or two about how to get viewers to hate his character.

– James Berardinelli for Reelviews, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

As in 300: Rise of an Empire, Green is a scene-stealer and she injects enigmatic allure into her damsel in distress role – a femme fatale that is made all the more captivating by the film’s subtle use of situational red, green, and blue coloration.

– Ben Kendrick for Screenrant, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For Review

The title story is the most thrilling, if only for Eva Green’s sensational performance. She has affected shades of noir in previous roles, but as the scheming Ava Lord, Green is a terrific femme fatale, luxuriating in Miller’s Chandler-esque dialogue while devouring the scenery and every inhabitant in it.

– Radheyan Simonpillai for NOW Toronto, Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

G   /   August 24, 2014   /   3 Comments

By Emily Zemler

 

Eva Green is impressively terrifying in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For. In the film, out August today, the French actress embraces the role of Ava Lord, a dangerous femme fatale set on revenge and murder. It’s an impressive and powerful performance from Green, who also recently appeared in 300: Rise of an Empire and currently stars on Showtime’s Penny Dreadful. The role also meant that Green spent much of filming with director Robert Rodriguez in various states of nudity. So much so that the promotional poster for the movie featuring the actress was deemed too racy and had to be edited due to the visibility of a nipple. We caught up with Green at a recent press day for the film in Los Angeles and chatted about working on Sin City, being naked and that infamous nipple incident.

 

You’ve been making a lot of movies with green screen lately.

I mean, I didn’t do this movie because it was green screen. It was a really cool project. The script was great. And yes, it was green screen–ike greener than ever: no furniture, no nothing. There was nothing there. Sometimes you have props, but it’s quite a weird world. The first day you’re like, ‘Oh my God.’ I was lucky because I had real actors to interact with. I know some of the other actors did not have that chance.

Is that a challenge to have nothing around you?

You don’t know how it’s going to turn out. So the other actor is saving you. It’s like theater. I haven’t done theater in 10 years.

So this is like doing theater without actually doing theater?

Yeah, exactly. You have a small audience and you can fuck up. It’s wonderful.

Why was the character of Ava Lord interesting to you?

She is so extreme and irreverent. She’s like a homage to the great characters of film noir. It was just fun to play somebody so evil. She’s so jaded with no sense of morality. I’m so not like that.

She definitely taps into something most women probably wish they could channel.

Yeah, I wish I had a bit of her power. She’s scary.

You basically wear no clothing the entire movie. Was there ever any trepidation about being naked so much?

Any actor and any actress are very nervous when we have to do that kind of scene. It is not gratuitous [with Ava]–the way she uses sexuality to get men and use men is part of her character. But also it’s not realistic. It is art. Robert lights it in such a way. He promised me there would be lots of shadows and stuff and things would be added in post. That was very important. But on the day you feel nervous. And then you kind of forget that you’re naked. It’s very strange. You’re so stressed that it’s like, ‘I’m not naked. I’m not naked. I’m not naked.’

 Do you do anything the day before to prepare for that?

A lot of actors get drunk. But I was cast a week before shooting so I didn’t have time to do much prep at all: So no time to go to the gym. I put myself in the hands of Robert and asked him to remove the cellulite in post-production.

 Is that the secret to losing cellulite?

I don’t know! I think with shadows they can. I mean, can you imagine a femme fatale with really bad cellulite? That would be another version of ‘Sin City’!

Speaking of nudity, what was your reaction to the controversy over your poster for the film?

I don’t really understand it. If people have a problem with the poster then they’ll probably have a problem with the film. You see nothing on the poster really. It’s like ‘Why?’ I thought it was bad publicity or something. I don’t know what the problem is.

I looked at the original and the edited version side by side and could not really see the differences.

There’s no difference! It’s a setup or something. I don’t get it.

What do you think about Americans being so prude when it comes to nudity and sex?

It’s very subjective. In this movie it’s so not pornographic. It’s very decent, I think.

What did you think of the film once you saw it?

I haven’t seen it! I hate watching myself. It has nothing to do against the film. It’s just me and my ego. I can’t watch myself. I become very self-conscious.

Will you ever do theater again? You don’t have to watch yourself there.

I’m the kind of the person where that would suit me. I’m a control freak and I could prep, but it’s so stressful. I’m so worried about blanking out onstage. It happened to me, actually. At three o’clock every day you go, ‘Okay, in four or five hours I have to go there.’ I have so many butterflies and I get so nervous. There’s a part of me that would love to, but I don’t know if I’m brave enough to go back there.

Do you have that same anxiety on a film set?

No. Because you can fuck up and do it again.

Source: Elle

G   /   August 24, 2014   /   1 Comment

Here are some more reviews on Eva’s performance in Sin City: A Dame To Kill For. Click on the Source links for the full film review.

 

Of greater interest in any event is anything and everything involving Ava (Green), a spider woman so fatally gorgeous and seductive that no man can resist her. …….Pulp and noir were often built on the beautiful shoulders of such characters as Ava, and the main justification for seeing the film is to watch Eva Green claim membership in the pantheon of film noir leading ladies alongside Jane Greer, Gloria Grahame, Marie Windsor, Peggy Cummings,Lizabeth Scott and a few others. Frequently baring all in a way that was not allowed in the ’40s and ’50s and often lit by Rodriguez (who did triple duty as director, DP and editor here) in a high-contrast style accentuated by slatted light through blinds, Green more than earns femme fatale immortality by first reiginiting Dwight’s fire, then going through a succession of other admirers, including her loaded husband (Marton Csokas) and a married cop (Christopher Meloni) before receiving her well-deserved comeuppance. …..As an exercise in style, it’s diverting enough, but these mean streets are so well traveled that it takes someone like Eva Green to make the detour through them worth the trip.

– Todd McCarthy for The Hollywood Reporter, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For: Film Review

 

Eva Green makes for a viper of a character in Ava Lord, able to switch her behaviour according to the poor sap she’s trying to lure, and the actress is clearly relishing the chance to play such a conniving con artist who wraps men around her little finger and disposes of them when they’re no longer useful.

– James White for Empire Online, Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For Back in Black. And White

 

The showiest role belongs to Green as Ava, a knowing riff on the standard femme fatale that’s all scene-chewing bitchiness. Green has a ball playing the dangerous sexpot who gets her hooks into Dwight….

Tim Grierson for Screendaily, Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

 

Amazingly, one performer does emerge from the sludge of ‘Sin City: A Dame to Kill For’ with an emerald-eyed fury, and that’s Eva Green, fully committing to the title role’s silky monstrosity. Her frequent, brazen nudity – swimming pools and bathtubs are a big part of her day, apparently – is going to short-circuit some viewers (not just the overgrown boys, but anyone expecting a femme fatale with a hint of shame). Yet Green is the only one able to excite this silly material into the spiky shape it’s supposed to take. You wish the rest of the cast was as clued in.

– Joshua Rothkopf for Time Out, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

 

Eva Green by contrast…All calculated sensuality and dangerous curves, Green owns this installment of Sin City as surely as Rourke did the last one, replacing his self-consciously retrograde masculinity with a femme fatality so knowing and over-the-top that it flirts with satire. Her emerald eyes, ruby lips, and sapphire dress (on those occasions when she is, in fact, clothed) may pierce the monochromatic screen, but it is her canny mashup of cinematic seductresses from Jane Greer to Sharon Stone that offers the movie’s principal compensations.

– Christopher Orr for The Atlantic, Sin City 2: Not To Kill For

 

 

G   /   August 23, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Kyle Buchanan

“You cannot defeat the Goddess,” says one character in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For. “She cannot die.” He’s referring to Ava Lord, the seductive black widow who gives the film its title, and when she’s played by Eva Green, who can blame him for using heavenly superlatives? There’s always been something otherworldly about Green, who first impressed (and undressed) in Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Dreamers, won best Bond Girl ever honors withCasino Royale, and just this year starred as the formidable Artemesia in 300: Rise of an Empire and toplined the Showtime series Penny Dreadful. A few weeks ago in Los Angeles, the slinky Green met up with Vulture at The Four Seasons to tell us how she got into character for the Robert Rodriguez–directed Sin City, and how she felt about getting out of her clothes for it.

Do you consider yourself an inhibited person when you’re not shooting?
Oh, yes.

So it must surprise you how bold you can appear onscreen, especially in all of Sin City‘s sex scenes.
It’s very ironic, because I’m very shy. People don’t believe me: “She did The Dreamers, and all these other nude scenes!” But I remember telling my publicist, “I’m really naked in Sin City. Just wait.” I don’t know any actor who’s comfortable with nudity, but it’s not gratuitous in this film, because she uses her body as a weapon. Still, in the morning when you have a nude scene, you want to die. You feel quite silly to be in a tiny thong with Josh Brolin, who’s wearing flesh-colored Spanx, and you’re in front of a green screen — like, “This is not happening!” But Robert told us, “I’m going to add lots of shadows, and you’ll look great. I knew that I could trust him.

When you play a character like that, does any of that confidence carry over into your real life?
Maybe it gave me some confidence in doing press, because I used to be very nervous doing interviews for TV — and I’m still not great, I get sweaty — but I got better. At school, I was really shy. If a teacher asked me a question in front of other people, I’d melt. Lots of actors are very scared in real life, actually.

Your characters are so forward with men. Are you?
No. I’m shit. [Laughs.]

How much freedom as an actor did you have in a film like this, where Robert is trying to re-create a lot of the frames from the comic almost exactly?
It’s funny, because I was really worried about that before I started filming: Oh my God, you have to be so still! Can I even move my finger? Can I touch the other actor? And yes, he frames each shot like a painting and you have to hit the mark, and some of the stuff he wants exactly like in the comic book, but it was fine — especially because I had real actors in front of me, because I know some of the other actors didn’t. I wouldn’t have liked that, so I was really lucky.

Did you have to do a lot of work beforehand?
I was cast very last minute, like a week before shooting, and usually I like to prep, so I was panicked: “Oh my God, I have to work on an American accent and find the character, and there’s so little time!” So I watched some film noir, like Barbara Stanwyck in Double Indemnity, because this is so femme fatale. At the beginning, I looked at my character and thought, My God, she’s so evil. There are no cracks in her, and her heart is so hard. I’ve played evil before, but that one was 200 percent evil, so I had to find the jubilation in playing her. I brought my body and my heart to Ava Lord.

And none of the men in this movie can withstand her.
Yeah, she’s quite scary. Quite scary! It would be interesting to do a prequel, just to find out why she’s so hard. Maybe she was traumatized? Or maybe she was born crazy.

What do you get out of doing a show like Penny Dreadful, which is about to go into its second season?
It’s fun, and I love fun. I love playing mad people, actually. My character looks quite guarded and very Victorian and tight, and to be able to let it all out … it’s so fun to be that irreverent. It’s like having a really bad Tourette’s moment.

Do you watch the show? Did you see the seance sequence from your second episode?
No, I haven’t! It’s horrible.

Well, at least watch the show so you can get to the part where Josh Hartnett and Reeve Carney make out.
Oh my God. Oooh! [Laughs.]

Source: Vulture

G   /   August 23, 2014   /   1 Comment

Here are some reviews on Eva’s performance in Sin City: A Dame To Kill For. Click on the Source links for the full film review.

But the main attraction here is Green, who, in addition to serving as the film’s most eye-popping design element, invests Ava with a wild-eyed intensity worthy of Medea, adding another to the actress’ gallery of murderous screen sirens following her performances in “300: Rise of an Empire” and “Dark Shadows.” 

– Justin Chang for Variety, Film Review: “Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For’

 

But A Dame to Kill For‘s best special effect is Eva Green. When her femme fatale — homophonically named Ava — bursts into a bar to plead that ex-boyfriend Brolin take her away from her rich husband (Marton Csokas) and omnipresent bodyguard (Dennis Haysbert), her ripeness reduces him to two words: “Ava. Damn.” Green is sexy, funny, dangerous and wild — everything the film needed to be — and whenever she’s not on the screen, we feel her absence as though the sun has blinked off. In a movie that treats women like chew toys, Green is powerful, even when she plays weak. When she coos, “I guess I’m not a very strong person,” to her latest rescuer, not only is she wielding femininity like a trap, but it also feels as if she’s sending up the rest of the film.

– Amy Nicholson for Westword, Sin City’s Best Special Effect is Eva Green

 

Green is the only female performer who sees through this movie’s ludicrousness and dares to one-up it. Her nudity feels defiant — she and even Brolin show a lot more skin than any of the strippers – and she turns Ava’s rapaciousness into one of the few tangible objects in this movie made up principally of special effects. (Mickey Rourke, once again, brings soulfulness to the role of Marv, a monstrous tough-guy with a heart of tin.)

– Alonso Duralde for The Wrap, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For Review: Eva Green Steals This Juvenile Film Noir

 

It’s almost a problem that Green plays Ava so perfectly – you may find yourself hoping she slithers her way out of her admittedly well-deserved comeuppance.

– Isaac Feldberg for We Got This Covered, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For Review

 

No other actress so perfectly embodies the classic femme fatale as Green, who plays Ava Lord in a twisted tale that explains how street hero Dwight (now played by Josh Brolin) came to need that new face he had in the first film. …… No other actress so perfectly embodies the classic femme fatale as Green, who plays Ava Lord in a twisted tale that explains how street hero Dwight (now played by Josh Brolin) came to need that new face he had in the first film. 

– Travis Hopson for Examiner, Movie Review: Robert Rodriguez’s Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

M.   /   August 23, 2014   /   0 Comments

Gallery links:
– Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > Starburst – September 2014
– Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > Empire (UK) – September 2014

G   /   August 22, 2014   /   1 Comment

By David Marchese

 

The star of ‘Penny Dreadful,’ ‘300: Rise of an Empire’ and ‘Sin City: A Dame to Kill For,’ looks back at her year’s big roles

Eva Green’s year has been one for the history books, or from them anyway. In March, the French actress was seen in plate mail playing the vengeful Persian warrior Artemisia in the action hit 300: Rise of an Empire. Then, in late April, she popped up in Showtime’s Penny Dreadful, recently renewed for a second season, where she traded in ancient duds for frocks and black lace as Vanessa Ives, a Victorian prone to demonic possession. In August, Green caps her run of titillating period pieces with the release of the crime noir sequel Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, in which she played the dangerous siren Ava Lord. Though Green insists that any similarities between her trifecta of roles is accidental, 2014 has, coincidentally or not, been a renaissance for the 33-year-old, who first turned heads as Bond girl Vesper Lynd in 2006’s Casino Royale and since then has largely sashayed under Hollywood’s radar.

“To tell you the truth,” admits Green in her lightly accented English. “I was not offered something interesting [after Casino Royale] by Hollywood. Every role was the boring beautiful girl. Instead of doing that, I made movies that not a lot of people saw but were good for my heart. I’ve always found the movie business rather cold, so finding parts to play and having people enjoy them has made this year a miracle for me.”

 Not that the London-based Green, a high fashion favorite, isn’t used to attention — her mother is the well-known French actress Marlene Jobert (her father, Walter, is a dentist), and she’s been a regular in European tabloids ever since she appeared as a baby with her mom and twin-sister Joy on the cover of Paris Match. Perhaps that’s why off set, this self-described nerd prefers low-key pursuits at-odds with her fierce on-screen persona. “I like to stay home and read rather than go to a club or something,” Green says. “I’m very shy. If I go out, I’m hugging the walls. “

 Now, though, inhabiting the kind of powerful femme fatale roles that Angelina Jolie used to devour has now become Green’s specialty, rendering her a cult favorite and rescuing her from being eternally entombed as a Bond girl. “It’s been fun playing these strong, sexual women,” she says. “Especially in Sin City my character is a real bitch. She uses her body as a weapon. It’s very jubilating to do that. I wish I had the balls of my characters.”

 As the Motion Picture Association of America noticed, she’s got something else. Green’s Sin City poster showed her posing with a gun and wearing a sheer bathrobe that left little to the imagination. The MPAA subsequently refused approval for the poster’s usage. “I don’t understand the problem,” she says. Then she adds with a laugh, “I heard that if my nipples were made darker the poster would be fine.”

 With Penny Dreadful finished filming for the season, Green, whose dream collaborators include David O. Russell and Danish provocateur Lars Von Trier, is looking for her next project. “I’d like to do something funny,” she says, as long as it doesn’t require abandoning her blooming dark side. “It would,” she says, “have to be a comedy that’s very sharp, and very black.”

 

Source: Rolling Stone

G   /   August 21, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Sharon Tanenbaum

 

Lady in green! 

For the L.A. premiere of Sin City: A Dame to Kill For on Aug. 19, Eva Green looked sinfully sexy in an emerald lace Elie Saab Couture gown and seductive makeup.

“The idea was a ‘soft siren,'” celeb makeup artist Pati Dubroff exclusively told Us Weekly of Green’s look. “With her raven hair down in a soft wave, the feeling was slightly film noir — and taking a nod from the styling of the film.”

For sultry eyes, Dubroff used Surratt Expressioniste Brow Pencil in Raven to define and add drama to the brows. “I used Jillian Dempsey Khol Eyeliner in Jet Black at the base of the lashes an then Make Up For Ever Aqua Matic Eyeshadow Pencil in Diamond Golden Grey to give the eyes a smoky effect,” she told Us.

Next, she topped with a matte grey shadow and then layered the sparkling green Urban Decay Moondust Eyeshadow in Zodiac and a mulberry color cream shadow on top. She finished with a few coats of mascara.

“For the lips, we went with a bruised plum tone,” Dubroff said. To achieve the effect, she pressed Tarte Lipsurgence Power Pigment Pencil in Blushing Bride into the lips for a stained look that was also rich and defined.

Since the dress had an open back, Dubroff used Jergens BB Body Perfecting Skin Cream in Light. “It evened out the tone and provided a subtle sheen to illuminate the skin on her arms and back,” Dubroff told Us.

Source: Us Magazine

G   /   August 21, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Rob Lowman

 

Eva Green is striking as she walks into the room. The actress is wearing a form-fitting black lace dress. Her wrist and hands are adorned with shiny bracelets and large rings, including one of a skull.

As we sit and talk, though, it’s Green’s mysterious eyes that capture your attention. A sultry stare also comes in handy for “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” from writer-directors Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller. Like the first “Sin City,” it is based on Miller’s graphic novels. Green plays the twisted femme fatale Ava Lord in the film, which opens Aug. 22.

 A penetrating gaze also informed her character, Vanessa Ives, in the recently completed first season of Showtime’s “Penny Dreadful.” In the sophisticated horror series set in Victorian England, Green is an enigmatic medium who at times is possessed by strange spirits.

“She’s phenomenal — the fulcrum of the piece. She’s a ferociously committed actor,” says “Penny Dreadful” creator John Logan, the Tony Award-winning playwright and screenwriter of “Gladiator” and “Skyfall” who spent six months wooing Green for the role.

 “A TV series requires quite an important commitment and that was my fear,” says the 34-year-old French-born actress. “But Vanessa is such an amazing role with so many colors to play.”

The first season of “Penny Dreadful” gave Green a number of showcase moments. In the second episode, Vanessa is at a séance when she is suddenly controlled by several demons. It’s a riveting scene that goes on for five or six minutes, during which the actress becomes several different people.

As Ava Lord in “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For,” Green also had some of those turn-on-a-dime and become another person scenes. The trick to doing them, she says, is “not going over the top — that and the transitions, of course.”

“Ava plays the damsel in distress but she is also kind of a bitch,” adds Green, who appears almost shy and reserved. “The challenge to that was making her believable because she’s lying all the time.”

Rodriguez says Green was the only person that he and Miller could agree on to play Ava. “She pulls it off to where you go, ‘She’s a dame to kill for,’ ” he says.

In June, a poster for the film was banned by the Motion Picture Association of America “for nudity.” The graphic-comic stylized illustration shows the actress in a see-through white robe that emphasizes the curves of her figure. ABC also rejected a TV ad for the film because of Green’s sexy pose.

 When asked about it, she shakes her head. “I thought it was a joke when I heard. John Logan sent me an email when I was in Hungary and asked, ‘What’s up with this?’ I’m not sure why people objected,” she says. “You sort of guess the outline of the boob. I am holding a gun, though, and no one questions that. It’s all about nothing really.”

There is a fair amount of nudity in “A Dame to Kill For,” which is in 3-D, but the actress is no stranger to that. She made her film debut in Bernardo Bertolucci’s sensuous coming-of-age film “The Dreamers” (2003). Set against the backdrop of the 1968 Paris student riots, it tells the story of three young people and their sexual experimentation.

 Green actually grew up in Paris. Her father is Swedish. Her French mother is Marlène Jobert, an actress who worked with Jean-Luc Godard and Louis Malle, two of France’s greatest New Wave directors. Interestingly, before being cast in “The Dreamers,” the actress had a poster on her wall of Bertolucci’s most notorious film, “Last Tango in Paris” (1972), starring Marlon Brando, which made waves because of its sexual content.

In 2005, another heavyweight director, Ridley Scott, cast her in his Crusades epic, “Kingdom of Heaven.” The next year found her in the re-launch of the James Bond franchise in “Casino Royale” as the sexy but strong Vesper Lynd, a female to match Daniel Craig as the newly minted 007.

 Though Green now bases herself in London, she says it was that film that accounts for her English accent.

“I had a lot of pressure when making it, actually. The studios were insistent that Vesper had to be British. So I worked night and day on my accent with a coach,” Green says. “And I still work on it because of certain intonations or tendencies. I’m kind of a geek that way. I love languages and working on accents. It helps with building a character.”

Along with her film career, Green has appeared in a number of fashion ads for the likes of Armani, Lancôme, Emporio Armani, Montblanc and Dior, among others. I ask her to show me the large rings she is sporting. “It’s like my armor,” she jokes. “These two are from a Russian designer that I’m very fond of, and this one’s from Morocco, and this I’ve had since the age of 15, which is a long time,” she says, pointing to the silver skull.

 Green was planning to talk with Logan the next day about the second season of “Penny Dreadful,” which starts shooting in Dublin in September.

“It’s a luxury to work with him because I can go, ‘Do you mind if we cut that?’ Or, ‘I wish we had more complexity there.’ And he like, ‘No problem.’ He is so gifted and open. I feel lucky.”

She wouldn’t give any hints where her character might go in the 10-episode second year. “I think John would cut off my head.” But she would say: “It won’t be the same. It’s not like, here she goes again. She’s going on another journey.”

 As if she’s not busy enough, Green recently signed on to shoot “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children,” which Tim Burton will direct. The two had previously worked together on “Dark Shadows” (2012). She plays the title character, a guardian of a group of orphans with special powers.

As far as roles are concerned, Green prefers complexity, but says, “I don’t want to be typecast with people thinking ‘She is just dark and a femme fatale.’ A good comedy might be simpler, maybe. I don’t know. I like complex. So we’ll see.”

 As intense as the roles she takes on might be, don’t think Green spends all her time brooding. “I can get out of the character really quickly and have fun with the crew,” she says.

Since the actress describes herself as a quiet homebody type, it’s curious as to why she’s attracted to such strong and fearsome roles.

“I don’t know. I should ask a therapist,” she says with a small smile. “It’s kind of liberating for me to play kind of evil people because I’m so not like that in real life. You know, I’m not too confident. So it’s just kind of fun.”

 

Source:  Los Angeles Daily News

G   /   August 18, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Ethan Sacks

 

Eva Green bares more than her soul as the title femme fatale, while Rosario Dawson and Jessica Alba all have key action scenes; even Lady Gaga has a part as a conservatively dressed waitress.

“Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” was so green-screen heavy that cardboard boxes were used in place of cars on set, but one thing was completely genuine: Eva Green’s nudity.

As the titular vixen in the noir thriller opening Friday, the actress had to embody a woman so alluring, she drives men to murder. Green did a great job — even the revealing poster of her Ava Lord in a see-through-top has been banned. But ticket-buyers will get a much better view.

“Of course, as an actor you feel so silly being naked and you want to die, you just kind of become numb and you just do the scene,” Green, 34, tells the News. “And you know (director Robert Rodriguez) just has such taste and style that you are in good hands.

“I really think [being nude in the film is] not gratuitous, especially for my character who uses her body as a weapon. She uses men and her sexuality as part of it.”

Welcome back to Sin City, the boozy, bloody home of grifters and drifters, mobsters and molls. Like the 2005 original “Sin City,” the dark tales that make up the sequel are taken directly from the pages of Frank Miller’s iconic graphic novels.

But not everything is as black and white as it was the first time around. Now it’s the dames — like Rosario Dawson’s killer dominatrix — who dominate much of the R-rated flick’s action.

“There’s a lot of estrogen in this one,” says Jessica Alba, who reprises her role as the city’s erotic dancing muse, Nancy. “There’s very powerful women in this movie, and I think it’s so great because the misconception is that there can only be strong guys in this genre.”

A lot has changed for both Alba and her character in the nine years since the first “Sin City” was released. The last time around Nancy was a scared damsel in distress who danced away her insecurities for leering men in a bar — and the actress now says she felt just as self-conscious herself gyrating away.

Alba, 33, says she’s grown up a lot since, becoming a better actor and more importantly, a mother to two daughters , Honor Marie and Haven Garner. “I certainly feel that I’ve evolved as a person and an actress,” says Alba, “and I have [more] fearlessness as a performer after I had kids than I did prior to having kids.”

So she wanted Nancy, now an alcoholic out to avenge the murder of the only man she ever loved, to show the same type of growth, choreographing her sexy dances for months before cameras rolled and running around firing CGI crossbow bolts into the heads of her enemies.

“Being able to play a character that starts off being this kind of 

victim who’s an innocent naive girl … and then to see her take her destiny into her own hands and avenge him and become this warrior was so cool,” says Alba.

Dawson’s Gail practices feminism of the more blunt variety — as in leading a group of violent vixens who dish out blunt-force trauma to male evil-doers. But the New York-born actress says it’s not as revolutionary a concept in a traditionally macho genre as it looks.

“I love watching old noir films,” says Dawson, 35. “There were some amazing, multilayered roles for women like Bette Davis. Hollywood has really dropped the ball and taken them away since…and we’re kind of bringing that back again.”

Davis, though, never wore a leather S&M-tinged outfit like the one Gail sports through the movie, more practical for showing off a backside than for buttkicking.

Dawson finds it amusing that in a film where Lady Gaga has a cameo as a fairly conservatively dressed waitress, she’s the one trussed up like Lady Gaga. But Dawson’s costume really helped her “get” the character.

“I remember when my first doll came out from the first film, with a dominatrix outfit, handcuffs and an Uzi,” says Dawson, laughing. “She is that person. She lives and breathes that. I love that. Everything about her screams.”

For Green, who comes off much more demure in real life than in reel life, her “Dame to Kill For” is the most evil character she’s ever played. That says a lot — since she’s previously chewed the scenery through nefarious parts in “300: Rise of the Empire,” “Dark Shadows” and the Starz series “Camelot.”

“To be so bad and irreverent is sort of fun, weirdly,” says Green. “Maybe because I’m not like this in real life, to embrace it fully and to be so bad, it’s just fun.”

 

Source: New York Daily News

G   /   August 18, 2014   /   2 Comments

By Alice Howarth

 

She became a household name after playing Casino Royale‘s Bond girl in 2006, but now French-born actress Eva Green is courting both new audiences and controversy as she takes on her biggest role yet. Playing femme fatale Ava Lord in the upcoming Sin City sequel, Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For, Green’s teaser poster and trailer was banned in America earlier this month after it was deemed “too sexy” for the nation’s audiences. As the star gears up for her vixen to be unleashed on screen, she talks to GQ about the films she watched to prep for the role, who she’d like to work with next, and why men should never, ever wear cologne…

GQ: What’s the most sinful thing you’ve ever done?
Eva Green: Woah. I can’t tell you [laughs]! I’m a good girl, I’m very wise and a good girl. I was very serious in school.

Do you think the Motion Picture Association of America was too harsh when it banned your ad?
I think so, I mean the film is very beautiful, it’s very artistic. It’s not vulgar at all, it’s actually very decent so I didn’t really understand what all the fuss was about but at least it’s publicity, people will hear about it I guess.

You said that when you were in drama school you “picked the really evil roles [as it’s] a great way to deal with your everyday emotions.” How did you get into character playing a violent, gold digging, vixen?
I watched a lot of film noir. Double Indemnity with Barbara Stanwyck, other films with Bette Davis. Ava Lord is a very extreme femme fatale, she’s really very jaded, she manipulates men, she feels empowered and smarter when she does it, she’s incredibly full-on – nothing is sacred. The main thing is to have fun with those kind of characters. She’s so free and corrupt, she’s just bonkers. It really was so fun to play.

The film features a lot of lingerie. What would be your advice to men buying their girlfriends lingerie as gifts?

I wear a lot of corsets in the movie and I think it’s very sexy, kind of retro and very classy, I think men should definitely buy those.

 What should no man have in his wardrobe?

You know what, I don’t really like perfume. I know it’s not clothing but I prefer when men don’t wear it. I don’t like cologne. It’s as if they’re hiding something. I like perfume as it works on a woman, but on a man they lose something, their manliness. It’s less… animal.

Can you recommend a good book?
Yes. I recently read The Shadow of the Wind by the Spanish writer Carlos Ruiz Zafón. It was a beautiful story and a great book to read on holiday. Very romantic.

Where would you recommend a friend to eat in London?
Definitely St. John’s Bread & Wine on Commercial Street in Shoreditch.

How did you find working on a green-screen stage forSin City 2: A Dame To Kill For?
At first you’re very overwhelmed but then you really get used to it. You know that Robert [Rodriguez, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For co-director] and Frank [Miller, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For co-director] are going to do amazing things post filming. To have real actors to act with is always the main thing when making a movie so that was fun and the atmosphere on set was really gentle, laid back and just incredibly fun.

You’ve called Ava “multidimensional”. Are there any sides of her character that you admire?
She’s very brave, if she wants something she’ll get it no matter who gets hurt. She’s obsessed with money and power. She doesn’t apologise about her behavior and in that sense sometimes I wish I could be a bit more like that. But she does take it to the extreme, because people die for her so I wouldn’t want that, but to have her power would sometimes be helpful.

You’ve said in the past you’d like to go back to the theatre as Hollywood is likely to typecast you as a femme fatale. Were you nervous then about playing the biggest femme fatale of the moment?
No. It depends what the role is, what the project is. With Sin City I didn’t even think twice about it. It’s so fun, she’s quite funny because she’s so extreme, it’s very pleasant to play someone like that. Of course, I don’t want to be typecast as a dark femme fatale my whole life but you know I play Penny Dreadful who is very different from Ava Lord, and I’m about to do another film with Tim Burton, whose character is also very different. I’m not typecast at the moment.

With a cast of beautiful women including Jessica Alba, Rosario Dawson and Jamie Chung was there any female rivalry on set?
Well actually we didn’t meet. They were all finished when I arrived and I arrived last on board. But I met them separately for publicity and they’re lovely girls and they’re really not competitive at all. I just wish I had had some scenes with them. I only had scenes with men, all men [laughs].

Who would you most like to work with next?
There’s so many but I love Matthew McConaughey, I think he’s really intentioned and so interesting. I would also love to work with Marion Cotillard.

What’s next for you?
I’m about to start the second season of Penny Dreadful and then I’m going to start filming on Tim Burton’s new film in February, so I’m going to be busy.

 

Source: GQ (UK)

M.   /   August 17, 2014   /   1 Comment

The former Bond Girl and Penny Dreadful star on how acting helps her overcome shyness, why she’s naughty healthwise and why she swapped Paris for London.

Gallery link:
Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > Hello! (UK) – August 18, 2014

G   /   August 17, 2014   /   1 Comment

Eva Green likes wearing black because it takes away any wardrobe mishaps.

The 34-year-old actress enjoys dressing up as the characters she plays in movies like Sin City: A Dame to Kill For and 300: Rise of an Empire, plus it’s fun to don expensive things to promote her flicks. But while she’ll make an effort for the red carpet, out of the limelight it’s a different story altogether.

“I’m very casual and I like comfort, so I live in jeans and T-shirts. I like to wear black because I don’t have to think about it in the morning,” she told British magazine Hello! “I’m not a girly girl spending hours putting on make-up. When I do press or red carpet events, I have great hair and make-up people to make me look glamorous. That can be fun, like a little girl playing dress-up. But for most of the time, I’m too lazy.”

While she might not pay too much attention to fashion, Eva is clear about her health and fitness goals. Unfortunately she doesn’t have any tips to make the process of staying in shape any easier, but does warn that there’s no need to deprive yourself from tasty things all the time.

“It’s very boring but you have to drink lots of water and eat lots of vegetables. I am supposed to do this as an actress because we have to watch out for our bodies but I am very naughty and don’t do it enough,” she laughed.

Source: Yahoo