Archive for the ‘Review’ Category
G   /   May 09, 2015   /   0 Comments

G   /   March 11, 2015   /   0 Comments

There are few experiences in modern cinema quite as intoxicating as watching Eva Green behaving badly. Whether she’s an American housewife on the verge of a nervous breakdown in White Bird in a Blizzard, or fixing those deep turquoise eyes on her oppressors in the revenge western The Salvation, or wrestling demons in the TV series Penny Dreadful, it’s impossible to tear your gaze away.

Green is an enigma, hiding in plain sight. She’s a femme fatale with as many female admirers as male ones, a Bond girl who all but ate Bond for breakfast. Her beauty is of the troubling sort that drives prim conformists mad – they’re forever wanting her to fix her teeth, go easy on the eye make-up, tone down the witchiness and look like everyone else.

Read the full article here on telegraph.co.uk.

G   /   March 10, 2015   /   0 Comments

On the penultimate day of the rewrite, I finally brought up Eva Green. Pitt was sitting on the chair, the sun was setting in one of the windows, and Madison Street, which was three stories below us, was clogged with cars. The Dreamers was Green’s first movie, and the first of the many sex scenes in her career—the most outrageous of which is in 300: Rise of an Empire. In a sense—at least a cinematic sense—Pitt deflowered her. (“You are my first love, my first great love,” Green says to Pitt in The Dreamers, after fucking him on a couch.) “What is she like in person?” I asked him with a tone that I thought perfectly concealed my fascination with the actress. Pitt, who had heard me sing nonstop praises for his performance of the Kurt Cobain–like character in Gus Van Sant’s Last Days, looked at me for a moment and, as if finally realizing that my devotion to him was lower than the one I had for his costar in The Dreamers, said with almost cool cruelty: “You and every other man wants to know that.” I never brought the matter up again.

My fascination with Green is not, however, as sordid as Pitt’s response implied. I admire her mostly on a cinematic plane. She has a face, and particularly eyes—big green eyes—that can communicate all the needed information about her character’s soul or emotional state. One fact that separates film from theater: Acting is less important than visage. On a stage, which is always distant, a face means comparatively little; on a movie screen, a face is almost everything. Indeed, it is precisely this fact that enabled Green to deliver such a great performance in the new and excellent Danish western The Salvation without saying a single word through the entire film.
G   /   January 23, 2015   /   0 Comments

By Collider Staff

 

Penny Dreadful – “Closer Than Sisters”

Eva Green should be getting some awards recognition for her work on Showtime’s Penny Dreadful.  Want to see why?  All you have to do is watch episode 5, “Closer Than Sisters.”  It was pretty clear that she was going to own the show after the seance scene in episode 2, but “Closer Than Sisters” isn’t just a standout installment because of one mind-blowing moment.  Green nails a drastic single-episode arc that takes Vanessa from a bright, kind young woman to one plagued by demons and darkness.  “Closer Than Sisters” functions as a brilliant character piece and standalone episode, but it was also a major game changer for the rest of the show.  Whether you’re watching a scene between Vanessa and Sir Malcolm (Timothy Dalton) or one during which she’s exploring her budding romance with Dorian Grey (Reeve Carney), it all comes back to what she experienced in this episode. – Perri Nemiroff

Rest of list HERE.

Source: Collider

G   /   October 18, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Dennis Dermody

White Bird In A Blizzard
Gregg Araki’s latest is a moody, melancholic, spellbinding movie based on the novel by Laura Kasischke. Set in 1988, teenage Kat (Shailene Woodley) is dealing with her mother’s (Eva Green) mysterious disappearance one day. Time passes with no word from her and she gets by living with her sadsack dad (Chris Meloni), hanging with her friends (Gabourey Sidibe & Mark Indelicato), seeing a shrink (Angela Bassett), sometimes screwing her dim but criminally cute neighbor (Shiloh Fernandez) and hooking up with the hot investigating detective (Thomas Jane). But she is haunted by dreams of her mother. Eva Green (seen in flashbacks straining furiously to break the bonds of her oppressive married live) is frighteningly good. Araki’s spot-on use of period music and dreamy cinematography give the film a haunting Mysterious Skin-like vibe, which serves it wonderfully.

Read the rest of the list HERE.

Source: Paper Magazine

G   /   October 12, 2014   /   1 Comment

Here are some more reviews on Eva’s performance in White Bird in a Blizzard. Click on the Source links for the full film review.

Green most certainly enjoys playing the more over-the-top roles, and this is another one to add to the collection. She’s absolutely engrossing on screen, as we just can’t keep our eyes off of her crazy antics throughout the course of the flashbacks.

– Jeff Nelson for DVDTalk, White Bird in a Blizzard 

Also stellar here is, unsurprisingly, Eva Green, Hollywood’s boldest actress and White Bird in a Blizzard’s enigmatic conflict-catalyst, a troubled woman lashing out against domestication while losing her mind.

– Matt Barone for Complex, Permanent Midnight: Shailene Woodley, Eva Green, and More ‘Week Two’ Fantasia Film Festival Highlights 

Green plays up the hysteria in Eve’s voice and performs in a scene-chewing manner that leads up perfectly to a character meltdown.

– Allyson Johnson for The Young Folks, Ally’s Movie Review: White Bird in a Blizzard

The flashbacks are explosive bouts of emotion, with Eva Green snarling and spitting venom as only Eva Green can….and the melodramatic showcase for Eva Green as a housewife spiraling out of her mind in a loveless marriage and joyless life is filled with fireworks you cannot take your eyes off of.

– Mike Shutt for Rope of Silicon, ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’ (2014) Movie Review

G   /   October 07, 2014   /   1 Comment

Here are some more reviews on Eva’s performance in White Bird in a Blizzard. Click on the Source links for the full film review.

……She’s matched in intensity by Eva Green, who is such a delicious mess as Kat’s mentally unwinding mother that I missed having her on screen. 

– Scott Feinberg for scottfeinberg.com, Sundance Review: White Bird in a Blizzard

As I’ve already harped on, the casting in this movie is brilliant. Just imagine Eva Green as a misanthropic housewife, someone who would be jealous of her daughter’s looks, because she’s getting old. This is a woman whose chest was too hot for a Sin City 2 poster, and that’s precisely why it works so well. Eva Green embodies Eve Connor, the miracle homemaker turned miserable, listless drunk, with a husky voice and a sliver of the possessed version of her Vanessa Ives character in Penny Dreadful, and it’s arguably more terrifying to find her in 1980’s suburbia. Eva Green is as magnetic an actor as there is working today (is there a more interesting one? Envision a movie that costars Green and Adam Driver…), and her absence is felt as much as her overwhelming presence in this one.

– Andy Greene for Popinsomniacs, Film Review: ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’ and Shailene Woodley Subvert Expectations

……current vamp-for-hire Eva Green, meanwhile, is all stylized hauteur, as if playing Joan Crawford under Todd Solondz’s instruction. (She’s pretty great, in other words.)…….Her mother Eve (Green) has no such reticence, posing at every given opportunity in slinky, ridge-shouldered femme fatale dresses and flirting lasciviously with local boys. (She extends a dinner invitation to one, cooing that she makes a mean “crab thermidor” — Green says the words as if offering sex on a popsicle stick. It’s the most delicious moment in the entire film.)

– Guy Lodge for HitFix, Review: Shailene Woodley and Eva Green spark in disappointing ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’

Christopher Meloni and Eva Green do just as strong work as Woodley. Eva Green continues her streak of manic strong women here in the role of Woodley’s mother Eve. Green’s over the top delivery works well here as a protrait of a mother who’s looks are fading as fast as her atrophy for the life she lives is growing inside of her. To see something as deranged as 300: Rise of an Empire and White Bird in a Blizzard and how she is able to gel into both perfectly is a testament to her prowess as a performer. Both films show that Green appears to be just beginning a very interesting and arresting career……The final moments between Meloni and Green are as heartbreaking as one will see this year.

– Adam Kautzer for FilmDispenser, White Bird in a Blizzard – Film Review (2014)

Eva Green took on the role of the disappearing mother, Eve. As always, Green was amazing and managed to make herself feel present on screen even though she was not the lead. Ever since I saw her in The Dreamers I can’t get enough of her!

– Nina Chabel for Montreal Rampage, Review: White Bird ina  Blizzard at Fantasia

G   /   October 04, 2014   /   1 Comment

Here are some more reviews on Eva’s performance in White Bird in a Blizzard. Click on the Source links for the full film review.

French actress Green, an underused talent, has always had something crazed behind her large, popped eyes, a ferocious energy that serves her well here as a woman disappointed by life and content to rage against it until everyone in her wake is as miserable as she is.

– Beth Hanna for Indiewire: Thompson on Hollywood, Sundance Review: ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’

Eva Green goes deliciously unhinged in Gregg Araki’s latest!

– Peter Debruge for Variety, Sundance Film Review: ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’

Because it must be said—Eva Green isn’t exactly the star of ‘White Bird,’ but she gives one hell of a performance. With the small running time she’s in, she doesn’t just chew up the scenery, she devours it whole (including every actor that shares space with her). Her vicious maw is as staggering as her talent threatens to overshadow everyone who dares to come across her path……All in all, “White Bird in a Blizzard” is worth seeing for Eva Green’s performance alone, and to experience the dreamlike quality of Gregg Araki’s individual, highly unique vision of cinema.

– Chase Whale for Indiewire: The Playlist, Sundace Review: Gregg Araki’s ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’

Eva Green’s performance is unbelievable. She’s intense, beautiful and creepy at the same time. Her face, her voice and attitude transpires so much, how come this woman does not have an Oscar? Or is not a goddess in a Marvel movie? 

– wornoutspines.com

Green walks a fine line between composure and lunacy, although the director pushes her to one or two over-the-top moments.

– Todd McCarthy for The Hollywood Reporter, ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’ : Sundance Review

G   /   September 09, 2014   /   4 Comments

By Jason Shawhan

A Dame to Kill For is the sequel to 2005’s Sin City in the most literal way. Thematically, it’s part of a chain of adolescent, hyperviolent misogynist fantasies going back to 1980’s Heavy Metal: hard-boiled men who know the languages of violence and betrayal, and an assortment of noble virgins and streetwise whores to pepper the narrative with occasional frissons to distract from the murder and double-crossing. This is more of the same, but with one noticeable upgrade that allows co-directors Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller to claim some of the zeitgeist.

A Dame to Kill For is a must-see because of the transcendent performance of Eva Green. Much as she did with 300: Rise of the Empire earlier this year, she steps into a digital backlot and commits wholeheartedly to whatever the film requires. She’s got a gift for elevating material that has in 2014 alone made two sequels that nobody asked for into essential summer flicks, and it’s all due to force of will and a lack of inhibitions.

She’s always been a worthwhile screen presence, but it seems like she just recently found her groove — her Showtime series, Penny Dreadful, is a gleeful and atmospheric masterpiece of horror’s grand history, and she’s racking up great notices in films that are otherwise thrown to the hounds.

Hers is a remarkable face. She has a distinctive look, one that recalls screen beauties of the Golden Age of Hollywood; you realize that Green could have been a star at any point in Hollywood history since the ’20s. She’s got a brassy, glam sensibility that calls to mind Bergman, Bacall and Hepburn, but with the devilish sense of humor (and willingness to deploy the goods) of early ‘90s Sharon Stone.

As it stands, Green and Mickey Rourke are the only cast members who seem like they could actually pull off real noir — not just the monochromatic karaoke of so much of the Sin City franchise.

The rest is mostly a muddle. A Dame to Kill For jumps around in time, trying to serve as a prequel and a sequel to the 2005 original, but there’s a specific point where at least several months pass and there is no indication given to the viewer that this has happened. As always, if you’re engrossed in a story, it wouldn’t matter. If it weren’t for Green’s dynamic energy and carnal joie de vivre — and a competently funky Lady Gaga cameo that delivers classic Marisa Tomei realness — you’d be able to pinpoint the exact moment that the film loses its bearings.

Its box-office disaster last weekend doesn’t bode well, but let’s hope this film provides the impetus for an Eva Green/Angelina Jolie buddy film where they kick all ass. I would be there opening day, and you should be too.

Source: Nashville Scene

G   /   August 28, 2014   /   1 Comment

Here are some more reviews on Eva’s performance in Sin City: A Dame To Kill For. Click on the Source links for the full film review.

 

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For is more low-key than the first Sin City, but it’s also a more enjoyable romp thanks to another grand Eva Green star turn….For reasons I cannot entirely justify, I was less annoyed by both factors this time around. Maybe I’m just more forgiving in my old age. Or maybe Eva Green makes everything better….Eva Green of course plays the titular “dame to kill for,” which is a fine example of truth in advertising. Just as she almost single-handedly elevated 300: Rise of an Empire above its predecessor earlier this year, Ms. Green powers the main story and provides a solid counter-balance to the original film in which most of the women were victims. 

– Scott Mendelson for Forbes, Review: Eva Green Owns ‘Sin City: A Dame To Kill For’

Green has described Ava as less a woman — and she is allwoman — than a weapon, an improvised erotic device that explodes in the heart, guts and gonads of every man she meets…As for the sex: that’s Ava. She is the prime force of evil, and Green is the new movie’s reason for being. In a film era that mostly ignores womanly allure for guy-on-guy battles and bromance, Green has played the unregenerate temptress from The Dreamers (her debut) to 300: Rise of an Empire, with the miniseries Camelot and Penny Dreadful in between. But Ava was the role waiting for her. 

– Richard Corliss for TIME, Review: Eva Green is The Dame To Kill For in ‘Sin City 2’

Ms Green, thrillingly cruel, detached and dangerous, offers atonement. She seduces the audience as she seduces her men, with blinding confidence, and keeps the film from sliding towards blandness. The plot and the script might not always be to kill for, but the dame sure is.

– F.S. for Economist, New Film: ‘Sin City: A Dame To Kill For’

The film’s greatest assets are Gordon-Levitt and Green, who remains as coolly aloof as a circling eagle, despite spending much of the film naked in a variety of provocative poses.

– Robbie Collin for The Telegraph, Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For, Review: ‘A Chilly Appeal’

 

G   /   August 27, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Alison Willmore

How the Sin City: A Dame to Kill For actress walked away with the year’s most macho sequels.

Most of the thrill of the original Sin City is gone in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez’s follow-up to their innovative 2005 graphic-novel adaptation, set in a stylized, digitally engineered world of black and white with splashes of color. The movie, which floundered at the box office when it debuted this past weekend, is just as intensely violent, lurid, and nihilistic as the first one, and this time, it’s in 3D, which lends an added oomph to its sometimes beautiful compositions. But Sin City: A Dame to Kill For is also stupefyingly — 100-plus minutes of just the climax of a story, everything turned up to 11, the characters so interchangeably hard-boiled that it can take a while to realize Josh Brolin is actually playing the same character Clive Owen did in the previous film.

It’s disappointing, except for the one thing Sin City: A Dame to Kill For does have that the first installment didn’t: a scene-stealing Eva Green, who, as Ava Lord, burns a giant hole in the center of the screen. In a movie in which Jessica Alba humps a stage and Mickey Rourke plucks out someone’s eyeball like he’s picking a particularly stubborn daisy, it’s not easy to be the center of attention, but Green easily dominates the gritty, gory affair. Her Ava is less femme fatale than dark deity, a goddess of self-destruction who men can’t help but cower in front of.

And Sin City: A Dame to Kill For isn’t the first hyper-macho Frank Miller sequel this year that Green’s walked away with — as Artemisia, the bloodthirsty villain in March’s 300: Rise of an Empire, she totally bowled over the indistinguishable muscly male lead (Sullivan Stapleton, if you’d forgotten). Ever since her 2003 debut alongside Michael Pitt and Louis Garrel in Bernardo Bertolucci’s racy The Dreamers and her 2006 stint as proto-Bond girl Vesper Lynd…

Green’s proven to be a little too much for Hollywood — too formidable for happily-ever-afters, too much presence to be a character actor, too beautiful to be ignored, and too…goth-y? But in 2014, Green’s been carving out a distinctive career for herself as the scariest and most intimidating of sex symbols, and it’s been awesome to watch.

Aside from that graphic-novel green-screen double feature, the Year of Eva Green has included the actress’s acclaimed turn as troubled psychic Vanessa Ives in Showtime’s Penny Dreadful, in which she shifts between serenely enigmatic, vulnerable, and terrifyingly animalistic. She’s also got upcoming roles as a “deliciously unhinged” mother (per Variety) in Gregg Araki’s White Bird in a Blizzard and a ferocious, mute outlaw’s wife in Kristian Levring’s Western The Salvation, both due out later this year. But it’s her parts in the Miller adaptations that particularly stand out, because they manage to feel subversive in an environment that’s almost toxically heavy on the testosterone.

Miller’s near-parodic odes to the toughest of tough guys can’t help but sideline their female characters — his stories are, underneath the blood and sweat, deeply romantic about the business of being masculine in the most archetypal of ways. The men might die for the women, seek solace in them, get them killed, and avenge them, but the women themselves are rarely the focus. And yet…as Artemisia and Ava, Green disrupts this pattern by refusing to be an object who is primarily gazed at or acted upon. In Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, she’s just as sexualized as her fellow female cast members (including Alba, Rosario Dawson, Jaime King, Jamie Chung, and Juno Temple), but she’s fully in control. When she goes to lure her ex Dwight (Brolin) back after leaving him years earlier to marry a rich man, she shows up nude, in his bed, serene in her certainty that she has him. Her sensuality’s presented as a weapon, and he’s resistant and resentful even as he gives in — and the sex scene, which is strenuously athletic and shot in silhouette, ends with him crouched at her feet, like she’s poised to bite his head off, praying mantis-style.

Ava barely bothers to play the victim, rolling her eyes at the ease with which she wins over one of the cops on the case (Christopher Meloni) by playing on his lust and protective instincts. Both Sin City movies do some ludicrous things in the name of “strong female characters” (like the women of Old Town, who are organized, armed, and impossibly tough, but not tough enough to move on from prostitution to more lucrative crime, and who, btw, also frequently have hearts of gold underneath the dominatrix gear). But Green plays Ava as someone who, while psychotic, is also thoroughly in charge, and who deflates some of the grandiosity the film invests in its male characters’ grand gestures of sacrifice and obsession.

Green’s even more fabulously bonkers as Persia’s ruthless top naval commander in 300: Rise of an Empire, now out on DVD and Blu-ray — sprawling on her throne at sea, manipulating Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro) into somehow transforming into a gilded giant, taking the heads of enemies and then making out with them. Artemisia is a survivor of prolonged violence who remakes herself into a fearsome warrior, and the film never really suggests her thirst for revenge is unfounded, making her feel at least as much antiheroine as antagonist.

Halfway through 300: Rise of an Empire, Artemisia and Themistocles meet for a parley that turns, natch, into more crazy sex. It starts with her grabbing his hair and leads to the two slamming each other into various surfaces around the ship before she tosses him out, leaving him stunned when he goes back to his colleagues. Artemisia’s desire, born out of how pleased she is to have found an opponent who can actually match her, drives the whole love-scene-as-battle-metaphor sequence, and it’s not suggested she’s giving up anything or losing stature because she chooses to act on it.

Artemisia is the lone woman in a world of men, but, as played by Green, she’s neither challenged because of this nor acting as just another one of the boys. She’s her own wild creation, unfettered but readily feminine, whether leaping into battle or donning an increasingly intense series of battle ball gowns (culminating in a dress that includes tasteful golden bone-spikes along the spine).

Green commits to her material, no matter how pulpy, which is why this cartoonishly outsized character, a highly fictionalized version of an actual historical figure, comes so vividly to life. She’s not simply hamming it up — she’s as soulful as she is scary.

Green’s so good in these two watered-down sequels that it’s easy to imagine her kept in similar roles going forward — brash, witchy, and doomed. There are worse things that could happen, but she really deserves more, and Penny Dreadful comes closest to showing her range, from demonic force to unguarded romantic lead. And even in the Showtime drama, her character’s formative moment involved the love of a man who couldn’t keep up with her. But being a force of nature shouldn’t condemn someone to wan roles.

Source: Buzzfeed

 

G   /   August 26, 2014   /   1 Comment

Much as she did with 300: Rise Of An Empire, however, Eva Green holds up the mid-section with great gusto. Pouting with just the right amount of vamp and camp, Green’s titular dame pushes this Sin City firmly into farce where it belongs. As a seductress extraordinaire, Green is having fun, which is more than can be said for the sour-faced fellows in her thrall. Watching her play the victim and thrust her head into the lap of the cop that comforts her is a pleasure only matched by the sight of her waiting by the phone for his call later that night (“About time,” she purrs). The fact she is nude while doing this is absolutely integral to the story, you understand; the film dips a whole star every time she’s off screen. 

– Ali Gray for The Shiznit, Review: Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

Green is breathtakingly villainous and captivating as the soulless woman driven by a greed that can never be satiated. In a cast of heavy-hitters who each dig into the task at hand with relish, Rourke and Green manage to breathe fire into and elevate otherwise straightforward characters and stories.

– Roth Cornet for IGN, Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame To Kill For Review

The filmmakers wisely hired the fearless, magnetic Eva Green to play—what else?—the delectably twisted femme fatale Ava, who offers up most of the aforementioned copious nudity. Reminiscent of Linda Fiorentino’s classic turn in the seedy suspenser The Last Seduction, and far more resourceful than the movie she’s in, Green’s Ava more than lives up to this picture’s subtitle.

– Jason Clark for Entertainment Weekly, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For (2014)

Appearing in her second Frank Miller adaptation of the year (after offering the most memorable scenes in the300 sequel), Green cements her scene-stealing credentials with a perfect femme fatale impersonation. Whether clothed or naked, she rivets the camera’s attention. Green shares the villain’s duties with Powers Boothe, who knows a thing or two about how to get viewers to hate his character.

– James Berardinelli for Reelviews, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

As in 300: Rise of an Empire, Green is a scene-stealer and she injects enigmatic allure into her damsel in distress role – a femme fatale that is made all the more captivating by the film’s subtle use of situational red, green, and blue coloration.

– Ben Kendrick for Screenrant, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For Review

The title story is the most thrilling, if only for Eva Green’s sensational performance. She has affected shades of noir in previous roles, but as the scheming Ava Lord, Green is a terrific femme fatale, luxuriating in Miller’s Chandler-esque dialogue while devouring the scenery and every inhabitant in it.

– Radheyan Simonpillai for NOW Toronto, Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

G   /   August 24, 2014   /   1 Comment

Here are some more reviews on Eva’s performance in Sin City: A Dame To Kill For. Click on the Source links for the full film review.

 

Of greater interest in any event is anything and everything involving Ava (Green), a spider woman so fatally gorgeous and seductive that no man can resist her. …….Pulp and noir were often built on the beautiful shoulders of such characters as Ava, and the main justification for seeing the film is to watch Eva Green claim membership in the pantheon of film noir leading ladies alongside Jane Greer, Gloria Grahame, Marie Windsor, Peggy Cummings,Lizabeth Scott and a few others. Frequently baring all in a way that was not allowed in the ’40s and ’50s and often lit by Rodriguez (who did triple duty as director, DP and editor here) in a high-contrast style accentuated by slatted light through blinds, Green more than earns femme fatale immortality by first reiginiting Dwight’s fire, then going through a succession of other admirers, including her loaded husband (Marton Csokas) and a married cop (Christopher Meloni) before receiving her well-deserved comeuppance. …..As an exercise in style, it’s diverting enough, but these mean streets are so well traveled that it takes someone like Eva Green to make the detour through them worth the trip.

– Todd McCarthy for The Hollywood Reporter, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For: Film Review

 

Eva Green makes for a viper of a character in Ava Lord, able to switch her behaviour according to the poor sap she’s trying to lure, and the actress is clearly relishing the chance to play such a conniving con artist who wraps men around her little finger and disposes of them when they’re no longer useful.

– James White for Empire Online, Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For Back in Black. And White

 

The showiest role belongs to Green as Ava, a knowing riff on the standard femme fatale that’s all scene-chewing bitchiness. Green has a ball playing the dangerous sexpot who gets her hooks into Dwight….

Tim Grierson for Screendaily, Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

 

Amazingly, one performer does emerge from the sludge of ‘Sin City: A Dame to Kill For’ with an emerald-eyed fury, and that’s Eva Green, fully committing to the title role’s silky monstrosity. Her frequent, brazen nudity – swimming pools and bathtubs are a big part of her day, apparently – is going to short-circuit some viewers (not just the overgrown boys, but anyone expecting a femme fatale with a hint of shame). Yet Green is the only one able to excite this silly material into the spiky shape it’s supposed to take. You wish the rest of the cast was as clued in.

– Joshua Rothkopf for Time Out, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

 

Eva Green by contrast…All calculated sensuality and dangerous curves, Green owns this installment of Sin City as surely as Rourke did the last one, replacing his self-consciously retrograde masculinity with a femme fatality so knowing and over-the-top that it flirts with satire. Her emerald eyes, ruby lips, and sapphire dress (on those occasions when she is, in fact, clothed) may pierce the monochromatic screen, but it is her canny mashup of cinematic seductresses from Jane Greer to Sharon Stone that offers the movie’s principal compensations.

– Christopher Orr for The Atlantic, Sin City 2: Not To Kill For

 

 

G   /   August 23, 2014   /   1 Comment

Here are some reviews on Eva’s performance in Sin City: A Dame To Kill For. Click on the Source links for the full film review.

But the main attraction here is Green, who, in addition to serving as the film’s most eye-popping design element, invests Ava with a wild-eyed intensity worthy of Medea, adding another to the actress’ gallery of murderous screen sirens following her performances in “300: Rise of an Empire” and “Dark Shadows.” 

– Justin Chang for Variety, Film Review: “Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For’

 

But A Dame to Kill For‘s best special effect is Eva Green. When her femme fatale — homophonically named Ava — bursts into a bar to plead that ex-boyfriend Brolin take her away from her rich husband (Marton Csokas) and omnipresent bodyguard (Dennis Haysbert), her ripeness reduces him to two words: “Ava. Damn.” Green is sexy, funny, dangerous and wild — everything the film needed to be — and whenever she’s not on the screen, we feel her absence as though the sun has blinked off. In a movie that treats women like chew toys, Green is powerful, even when she plays weak. When she coos, “I guess I’m not a very strong person,” to her latest rescuer, not only is she wielding femininity like a trap, but it also feels as if she’s sending up the rest of the film.

– Amy Nicholson for Westword, Sin City’s Best Special Effect is Eva Green

 

Green is the only female performer who sees through this movie’s ludicrousness and dares to one-up it. Her nudity feels defiant — she and even Brolin show a lot more skin than any of the strippers – and she turns Ava’s rapaciousness into one of the few tangible objects in this movie made up principally of special effects. (Mickey Rourke, once again, brings soulfulness to the role of Marv, a monstrous tough-guy with a heart of tin.)

– Alonso Duralde for The Wrap, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For Review: Eva Green Steals This Juvenile Film Noir

 

It’s almost a problem that Green plays Ava so perfectly – you may find yourself hoping she slithers her way out of her admittedly well-deserved comeuppance.

– Isaac Feldberg for We Got This Covered, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For Review

 

No other actress so perfectly embodies the classic femme fatale as Green, who plays Ava Lord in a twisted tale that explains how street hero Dwight (now played by Josh Brolin) came to need that new face he had in the first film. …… No other actress so perfectly embodies the classic femme fatale as Green, who plays Ava Lord in a twisted tale that explains how street hero Dwight (now played by Josh Brolin) came to need that new face he had in the first film. 

– Travis Hopson for Examiner, Movie Review: Robert Rodriguez’s Sin City: A Dame To Kill For