Archive for the ‘General’ Category
G   /   July 18, 2014   /   1 Comment

The Salvation has been nominated for three (3) Svend Prisen Awards! The film is vying for the Most Popular Danish Film title. Mads Mikkelsen is nominated for Best Actor for his role as Jon Jensen. Mads has previously won the award last year for his film The Hunt. Eva Green (The Salvation) is nominated for Best international Actor in a Danish Film in which she is up against Charlotte Gainsbourg (Nymphomaniac), Fares Fares (The Woman In The Cage) and Mikael Persbrandt (One You Love).

Svend Prisen is the only Danish Film Award giving body where it’s the audience who decides who the winners will be. Voting will start this Sunday and will end on August 24, 2014.

List of This Year’s Nominees

About Svend14

 

Source:  Svend Film Fest

 

G   /   July 18, 2014   /   2 Comments

July 25, 2014 – Finland

August 27, 2014 – France

October 2, 2014 – UK

October 9, 2014 – Germany

November 6, 2014 – The Netherlands

November 7, 2014 – Sweden

 

G   /   July 17, 2014   /   1 Comment

SinCity2-SDCC-Activities

Only 1 week left until #SinCity takes over #ComicCon! All of your favorite #SinCity2 talent and filmmakers will be at Exhibit Hall H on Saturday, July 26th at 2:50pm! 


Come in your best #SinCity fan gear or costumes to win prizes, while supplies last, at Petco Park and follow @DimensionFilms on Twitter for all #SDCC updates! #SinDiego

 

Other #SinCity Activities in store during SDCC 2014:

#SinCity Experience at Petco Park: Come see The Hot Rods and Hot Babes, along with swag giveaways and live DJ! Thursday -Saturday 10am-6pm ; Sunday 10am-3pm

#SinCity Talent and Filmmaker Poster Signing at Petco Park: 11:15am-12:15pm

#SinCity Talent and Filmmaker Poster Signing at Dark Horse Booth, Saturday Comic Con Convention Hall 4:15pm-5:15pm

 

Source: Sin City Movie Official Tumblr Page

 

G   /   July 10, 2014   /   3 Comments

MILAN, July 10, 2014 / PRNewswire / – Today, Campari ® is officially featuring Hollywood actress Eva Green as the star of the Campari Calendar 2015 The stunning actress born in France to star in this year’s version of the iconic calendar, entitled ‘Mythology Mixology’ , and is dedicated to celebrating the colorful history of Campari and stories related to the intrinsic twelve of his most beloved classic cocktails. Each month will focus on a classic cocktail and thus represent imaginatively anecdotes, stories and beautiful and little known stories behind each iconic recipe.

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G   /   July 10, 2014   /   2 Comments

Source: Ermahn Ospina’s Twitter

G   /   July 10, 2014   /   1 Comment

Source: EvaGreenWeb’s Twitter and Abel Korzeniowski’s Twitter

G   /   July 10, 2014   /   1 Comment

Music From the Showtime Original Series PENNY DREADFUL

Music Composed by 
Abel Korzeniowski
(A Single Man, W.E., Romeo & Juliet)

Some of literature’s most terrifying characters, including Dr. Frankenstein, Dorian Gray, and iconic figures from the novel Dracula are lurking in the darkest corners of Victorian London.  PENNY DREADFUL is a frightening psychological thriller that weaves together these classic horror origin stories into a new adult drama starring Timothy Dalton, Josh Hartnett and Eva Green.

The dark and richly textured Gothic score is by one of the most exciting new names in film music, Abel Korzeniowski.

PENNY DREADFUL is currently unspooling its first season on Showtime. 

Varese Sarabande Catalog # 302 067 298 8
Release Date: 08/19/14

 

Source: Abel Korzeniowski’s Twitter 

G   /   July 09, 2014   /   1 Comment

We’re excited to announce that PENNY DREADFUL will make its SDCC debut as the opening day headliner on Thursday, July 24th from 6:00PM – 7:00PM with a panel session in Ballroom 20. Featured panelists will include series stars Josh Hartnett, Reeve Carney and Harry Treadaway and series creator, writer and executive producer John Logan. The panel will be moderated by Emmy® Award-nominated actress (and major Penny Dreadful fan) Aisha Tyler!

Additionally, there will be talent signings, exclusive merchandise offers and more throughout the weekend! Fans can visit the Entertainment Earth Booth (#2343) to purchase a deluxe deck of tarot cards inspired by the ones used throughout the series, along with character action figures, including Ethan Chandler and Vanessa Ives. They can also visit the Titan Books Booth (#5537) to purchase special PENNY DREADFUL deluxe hardcover editions of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Oscar Wilde’s A Picture of Dorian Gray, which each contain original black and white illustrations by Martin Stiff, Louie de Martinis and Ian Bass. Furthermore, the over 150,000 lanyards worn by all Comic-Con attendees will be branded by PENNY DREADFUL.

Source: Showtime’s Memo

G   /   July 07, 2014   /   5 Comments

Ahead of the UK’s Season 1 Tuesday finale of Penny Dreadful, EvaGreenWeb got a chance to exclusively interview its resident vampire.  Armed with 15 questions and copies of Vanessa’s prayers in Latin, we ventured to the Demimonde to talk to Oxford School of Drama, Biochemist turned actor Robert Nairne. Find out below what the Cheltenham-raised actor thinks about the show, transmogrification, Ireland and what it’s like to work with Eva Green.

Robert_Nairne

 

EvaGreenWeb: How did this all come about for you?

Robert Nairne: Well, I had been acting professionally in London for around two years, largely in fringe theatre productions and voiceovers/audiobooks. A breakdown then came in on Spotlight (the casting hub in the UK) looking for a very tall slender actor with some stunts experience…already my interest was piqued, but then when I researched the incredible production team and the pitch for the show I was gobsmacked by the opportunity, and did all I could to be seen…. Luckily the wonderful casting team responded straight away to my various pestering emails and I met them for an audition a few days later – and here I am now..! I will truly never forget that phone call offering me the role. At one point I think I actually asked if she was joking.

EGW:  Can you briefly describe and explain who your character is to those who haven’t seen Penny Dreadful yet?

RN: Very little is really understood about these creatures in the Penny Dreadful universe so far. They seem to exist in the Demimonde, described so elegantly by Vanessa – preying on the living and roaming amongst the dead.

In ‘Penny Dreadful’, one such Vampire has abducted Sir Malcolm’s daughter, Mina Murray, prompting his increasingly frenetic hunt for her throughout the series. Why has she been taken though? Ooh you’ll have to watch and see…

EGW: There are so many different types of vampire lore now over the centuries, and this series uses specific types of lore that maybe people aren’t familiar with. Did you just go with what was in the script?

RN: The market is certainly quite saturated at the moment – which is why Penny D and its Vampires were so refreshing! I did of course do some research – I read Dracula and the original penny dreadful ‘Varney the Vampire’ (brilliant), and watched various movies from ‘Nosferatu’ to ‘Overworld’ – but yes the prime inspiration came from the script and John Logan’s brilliant mind. We had various discussions about The Vampires (affectionately named Penny and Felicity) throughout filming!

G   /   July 01, 2014   /   4 Comments

By Price Peterson

Penny Dreadful S01E08: ‘Grand Guignol”

There’s just something about Penny Dreadful that makes me want to elevate my language into the more poetic, elegant English of Victorian literature: Aye, gorblimey guvnuh that Eva Green is a right brilliant totty, cheers jolly good. Just kidding, I don’t know what any of that means, I can barely speak American let alone anything approaching the frequently next-level vocabulary of Penny Dreadful. Regardless, no discussion about this instant classic series can start anywhere other than how amazing Eva Green is. Eva Green is perfect basically. Her intense, frightening, eerily cool, tour-de-force performance was the centerpiece of Penny Dreadful and is what held together an otherwise unwieldy monster like the tightest of stitches. I’m not saying we should give Eva Green all of the awards for her work here, but if she doesn’t win them then awards are MEANINGLESS.

Because Eva Green is a national treasure. For what nation, you ask? The nation of TV. In which I am currently a political prisoner, long story.

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G   /   June 17, 2014   /   1 Comment

G   /   June 11, 2014   /   6 Comments

G   /   June 09, 2014   /   2 Comments

By Louis Peitzman

The French actor and former Bond girl has made a habit of playing supernatural beings, but on Showtime’s Penny Dreadful, she uncovers her character’s humanity.

Vanessa Ives may not have the name recognition of Victor Frankenstein, Mina Harker, or Dorian Gray, but she holds her own alongside her more infamous peers. On Showtime’s Penny Dreadful — which incorporates characters from Victorian horror literature like DraculaFrankenstein, and The Picture of Dorian Gray — it’s the all the more impressive that Vanessa, an original creation, is the standout character.

It helps that Vanessa, as portrayed by Eva Green, is relentlessly enigmatic, at times appearing to be the show’s ostensible heroine while also harboring dark, potentially dangerous secrets. Even after the June 8 episode (“Closer Than Sisters”), which explored Vanessa’s traumatic backstory, there are still innumerable unknowns.

“Oh, I think [creator] John Logan would kill me,” Green told BuzzFeed when asked to elaborate on Vanessa’s mysterious past. “I don’t know what to say, my god. I mean, she still has that kind of force inside her, and she’s trying to kind of tame it, let’s say, but sometimes it pops out. It’s always kind of interesting to play with it.”

That force inside Vanessa is a demon that has possessed her — but it’s unclear to what extent the demon is in control. And because Vanessa’s psychic abilities seem to predate her possession, it implies she was never all that human to begin with.

For Green, knowing just enough about Vanessa but not the whole story has aided her performance, which wavers between restraint and intensity. “It’s a challenge,” she admitted of having to hold her character’s cards close to her chest while revealing just enough to not tip off the audience. In fact, Penny Dreadful’s success lies largely in the perpetual suspension of that mystery, slowly portioned out over the course of the eight-episode first season.

In “Closer Than Sisters,” a flashback reveals that Vanessa can, to some extent, see the future, which places a heavy strain on her devout Catholic upbringing. In a moment of prayer, she is possessed by…something. Soon after, Vanessa finds herself inexplicably ill and suffering from terrifying seizures, until a stay at a mental institution — complete with restraints, frequent ice baths, and hosing down — and a subsequent lobotomy leave her nearly catatonic.

While these painful reveals came as a nasty shock to viewers, Green, however, had the luxury of exploring Vanessa’s arc ahead of time, receiving most of Logan’s scripts before production began.

“I was given seven episodes before I signed on,” she said. “There’s a thing about TV sometimes that is a bit scary — when they give you two or just even one episode, and they go, ‘OK,’ and you feel like a puppet. You don’t know where you’re going. [It] was very important to me, to know what was going to happen and what happened as well.”

Another important piece of the puzzle revealed in “Closer Than Sisters” was the origin of the rift between Vanessa and her friend Mina Harker (Olivia Llewellyn), a character from Bram Stoker’s seminal vampire novel Dracula. Their relationship is complicated, like so many on the series: Green likened it to the pairing of nurse Alma and her patient Elisabet in Ingmar Bergman’s psychological horror film Persona. Like Alma and Elisabet, Vanessa and Mina are both intimate and adversarial, with a persistent Sapphic subtext to their friendship. They’re the original frenemies, perhaps, eternally locked in an embrace and mutual strangulation.

Since Penny Dreadful’s premiere, Vanessa and Mina’s father, Sir Malcolm Murray (Timothy Dalton), has alluded to Vanessa’s unforgivable transgression. We now know that Vanessa had sex with Mina’s soon-to-be husband the night before their wedding, setting in motion a series of events that sends Mina away — and eventually into the arms of a powerful vampire.

“Mina becomes her cross to bear,” Green said. “What happened in Episode 5 is very complex, and myself, I don’t even have all the answers. I don’t know if she was really responsible, if she did it on purpose.”

While Vanessa continues to blame herself for Mina’s predicament, Green suggested that the truth about their circumstances is not as easy to uncover.

“I didn’t want people to think that she was a bitch, that she betrayed her best friend just because she fancied her boyfriend. It’s a fine line,” she said. “I think people will go, ‘Is she bad? What happened?’ [But] I try to understand her heart … She’s not bad.”

And it’s not as though Sir Malcolm is without fault, as he failed to protect Mina from falling under a vampire’s sway and took his son, Peter (Graham Butler), to Africa, only to have him die, which could have been prevented by Vanessa had she acted on her visions. The scenes between Malcolm and Vanessa, which Green said are her favorite to film, are fraught with tension. There’s a bit of a father-daughter relationship between them, coupled with bizarre and palpable sexual tension. Penny Dreadful’s “Closer Than Sisters” took that one step further, as Vanessa had sex with a demon who had taken on Sir Malcolm’s form.

At the end of the episode, Vanessa explains that while both she and Malcolm want to save Mina, only Vanessa is willing to kill her — if that’s what it takes. Green wouldn’t reveal much about how this conflict of interest might play out in the future, but she did speak to the complex dynamic at its core.

“I think it’s the most explored relationship in the first season, those two. It’s very complicated,” Green said. “Vanessa feels very guilty and she still has to redeem herself, but at the same time, she feels that Malcolm is not completely blameless at all, and she would like him to take some responsibility for what happened to Mina. It’s kind of a love-hate relationship. It’s very British, in a way.”

Whether in scenes with others or by herself, Green’s treatment of Vanessa is appropriately nuanced. She switches from confident and collected to pained and animalistic, growling and roaring in moments of possession, such as in Episode 2’s séance scene, in which Vanessa channels Sir Malcolm’s dead son Peter as well as her demon. Green watched footage of alleged victims of demonic possession in order to get a handle on her performance. The research was effective, she said, but as creepy as one might expect.

But while the supernatural elements are familiar to fans of Green’s work — she’s played a witch three times, in The Golden CompassCamelot, and Dark Shadows — Green insisted that the attraction of Penny Dreadful was more in the multidimensionality of her character. It’s not Vanessa’s ambiguous powers that make her interesting, but rather her all-too-human vulnerabilities.

“What I really love about Vanessa is that she’s always at war with herself. She’s very flawed,” Green said. “We shot eight episodes and we really have time to explore her soul … It’s a very, very rich character.”

Source: Buzzfeed

G   /   June 09, 2014   /   4 Comments

By Julie Miller

French actress and former Bond girl Eva Green has played no shortage of witchy women in her career—including a 300-year-old sorceress in The Golden Compass and Johnny Depp’s supernatural seductress in Dark Shadows. But in the Showtime horror drama Penny Dreadful, the actress dials up the intrigue and mystique for her most enigmatic character yet. As Vanessa Ives, a Victorian-era spiritualist on the hunt for a woman being held hostage in some kind of demonic underworld, her character encompasses the duality of good and evil under a veil of secrets. And in Sunday’s episode, “Closer Than Sisters,” we finally learn some of them.

Last week, we phoned Green to discuss the episode at length as well as the difficulties of playing crazy, Victorian psychiatric treatments, and her masterful séance scene earlier this season.

[If you have not yet watched tonight’s show, do not read further.]

Julie Miller: Your character is so complex and full of contradictions. How did [Penny Dreadful] creator John Logan describe her to you when he pitched the character?

Eva Green: He didn’t really have to. He sent me the first five episode [scripts] and I kind of connected with the character straightaway and I loved that she had such an amazing journey full of twists and turns. You discover her secrets little by little. It’s an extremely complicated character that I was lucky to be offered.

Other characters in the TV series are based on famous literary figures, like Dorian Gray, Frankenstein’s monster, and Mina Harker. Did John say if Vanessa was based on any famous literary or real-life figures?

No, I mean, sometimes I feel like I am playing John Logan himself. [Laughs] It’s a completely original, fictional character.

Did you consult any mediums or spiritualists before filming?

Oh yeah! I saw two psychics in Paris—one that kind of showed me how to spread the Tarot cards. I kind of got into that weirdly. I thought that was fascinating and if it’s well done, it can give you some [insight] into how to make the right decisions. I spoke to people who had visions and said they can see the future. It’s a bit scary but I completely believe in it now because I met a psychic who told me things [about my life] that nobody knows. She knew what had happened and told me what would happen in the future—so we’ll see if she is right.

Vanessa’s character is so offbeat, especially for a woman during that time period, and, at times, frightening. Where did you find this character inside yourself?

At the end of the day, she is a very tormented, torn human being and she is at war with herself constantly. She seems very smooth and in control, but underneath is all of this fire and all of these demons. She seems very cold sometimes and then she has these mad moments, especially for that time period. Victorian women were so uptight and almost seen like wax figures but she is kind of a rebel. She is ballsy and hungry to live, dance, and explore.

In [tonight’s episode] you discover the background of Vanessa and will understand why she is like this and how she has all of these powers and how she is completely consumed by guilt after her betrayal of Mina, Sir Malcolm’s daughter. And this guilt will manifest in a kind of sexual hysteria—or that’s what people think has happened. So I have lots of absolutely insane scenes, literally, that I had to do and they were a challenge. I love extreme scenes—it’s fun to let it all out rather than play the boring girlfriend or something.

What are some of the challenges of playing insane?

It’s scary because of course you do explore the darkness inside you. It’s cool to be crazy. It’s fun and people might think I’m a weirdo. But it was full-on, let’s say, and very demanding. I was completely shattered at the end of the day. But the crew was very nice and John Logan was looking after me like my dad.

Do you stay in character between scenes, especially for this episode where your character is going crazy?

Oh no! I need to laugh actually. It helps me to focus. I always find it so pretentious when actors stay in character. I like to have a great relationship with the crew. For those difficult scenes, I like to listen to a lot of music. It helps me concentrate and remind grounded.

Your character is subjected to some frightening psychiatric treatments common during that time period, including having a hole drilled into her brain to let what the doctors think are demons out. What kind of research did you do on the subject?

A lot. They used lots of water, freezing water, to kind of numb all of the senses. They used crude brain surgery. Women were not allowed to really express themselves—sexually, for sure, that was out of the question—but in any way. In this episode, we now know that the doctors and family think she is suffering from sexual hysteria but we know that it is this obscure force inside of her doing all of this damage. I am very visual so I looked at lots of pictures of women in hospitals during the time period. They were so scary that they were almost funny—women with their mouths very much open, looking very much like animals. It’s a bit scary because we don’t talk about sexual hysteria very much any more.

Did becoming that unhinged for those scenes affect your personal life in any way? For instance, did you have nightmares?

When you do something like this you do become a bit more aware—wondering whether there are forces around us. But sometimes as an actor, you have to put up your armor [to what your character is experiencing] otherwise you will end up in an asylum. When you do a role like this, you do approach the dark side. Though, now I know all of my prayers in Latin so I can also fight the devil. [Laughs]

I have to ask you about the séance scene earlier this season, which was incredible. [For those readers who haven’t seen it, Green channels a series of men, women, children, and the devil, in a six-minute tour de force worthy of its own Emmy.] How did you go about preparing for that?

My god, that was one of the most challenging scenes for me because I was worried I was doing too much. The most challenging things were the transitions actually, going from the little boy to the older boy and then to Mina and then the devil. I wanted to be understood and to be clear because it’s so fast and very easy to look ridiculous [acting that out]. I made sure to have like four cameras on me so I didn’t have to do it too much. It was hard though, to find the right recipe.

How did you even rehearse? Did you tape yourself?

I worked with my drama coach because by yourself you would drown in that scene. You need someone external who can help you a bit. That was very necessary for that scene. I also worked with John Logan and the director, J. A. Bayona, who was amazing. About two weeks before, we rehearsed that scene while playing really intense, mad music and trying to find the right amount of things I should do. J.A. was wonderful and if it had been another director, I would have been worried. For example though, in rehearsal, he gave me a rope and I was kind of pulling it. . . it helped me find moments, like where I was doing the child, and resisting. It helped me find the physicality. He’s very physical, very Spanish, and he helped me channel all of these little people inside me. [Laughs]

What I noticed is there was a butterfly during that seance that was around for those two days [we filmed the scene] and then it followed me around for the whole shoot, for all eight episodes. It was like my little guardian angel. It was very weird. Everyone was laughing. It was like a Penny Dreadful butterfly. A spirit.

What do your friends and family think seeing you play this kind of insane character?

Well I am in France and it hasn’t aired here yet so they have not seen it. But they know I work very hard. Actually I have not seen it either. I never watch anything I am in. I tend to be negative and it’s better to kind of keep [your films and TV shows] at a distance, like it was a dream or something.

What can you say about Vanessa’s development the rest of this season?

She wants to redeem herself and that obsession with redeeming herself gives her some weird power and makes her special at a time when women were so oppressed. You will see. She is unique by having this gift and for her it is very hard to give it up. You’ll see what she wants to do with it in the last episode. Mina is the love of her life and she will do anything to rescue her wherever she is in the underworld. It’s her cross to bear.

Source: Vanity Fair

G   /   May 26, 2014   /   1 Comment