Archive for the ‘Interview’ Category
G   /   March 17, 2019   /   0 Comments

by Janet Susan R. Nepales
 
 
Los Angeles — It is always a thrill to watch anything that Tim Burton does. And that includes his version of the well-loved 1941 Disney classic, “Dumbo.”

We were able to talk to the eccentric director as well as his talented and extraordinary cast composed of Colin Farrell (Holt Farrier), Eva Green (Colette Merchant), Danny DeVito (Max Medici) and Michael Keaton (V.A. Vandevere).

They shared with us their experiences creating and collaborating with the genius filmmaker and making this fantasy adventure live-action remake a reality.

Below are excerpts of our conversations with them:
*article edited to only included Eva’s part. Kindly click on source to read the full interview with Tim Burton and the rest of the Dumbo cast.*

Eva Green

When did you first see “Dumbo” and how was the experience shooting with Tim and the animals?
I saw the original movie when I was 4 or 5 years old. I have great appreciation now with the aerialists in the circus, because I am afraid of heights. So, I had to strengthen my arms and core, overcame my fear of heights. I love animals, I like the animals to be free, especially the elephants in Africa. When you see the result on screen, it’s so amazing, so realistic, the elephants. It is so sophisticated, it’s quite a wonderful job.

Did you ever go to a circus when you were a child? Which animals did you like?
It’s funny, I probably went twice as a child, and I always felt a bit sad. I don’t know what it was, there’s something, I don’t know if it was the clown or — but there was something. I don’t know, I can’t really explain it. But now, maybe it’s just seeing these wild animals in the circuses, it’s very sad. It doesn’t make sense that they are in captivity and children could feel that. I’m just very proud, as well, that Disney is taking a stand and is promoting animal-free circuses. Even zoos, we should not have wild animals in zoos. I went to Africa a few times and it’s so magical when you see those animals being free. It makes sense that they are free and not stuck in cages.

Do you see yourself as the muse of Tim Burton? You worked on several movies together. How would you describe your relationship with Tim?
I don’t know, I find the term very intimidating. I’m not sure. It’s very flattering, of course, but I’m just much honored that he’s asked for me for a third time. It’s so wonderful to be able to play characters that are so different, as well. You know, “Dark Shadows,” she was kind of a bonkers witch, a wounded witch. Then, Miss Peregrine, a woman-bird, and then here, a trapeze artist. She is a clearer character than the two others I’ve done with him. I’m just much honored that he’s given me those gifts.

What did you learn about your body being an aerialist?
It was very intense training, because I’m terrified of heights. So, it was a really big challenge. Tim asked me to do some of my own stunts, so I was like, “Okay, I’m going to try. But I can’t assure that this is going to work.” But I really tried, and I worked intensively with some circus people, like every day, two, three hours. First of all, you have to get like a really strong core, very strong arms. Then you get up there. But we went step by step, and it was amazing because I surprised myself. I thought I would never be able to do this. These people were very patient with me, and they gave me lots of confidence. I managed to take off, thanks to them.

Would you do it again?
Yeah, you know what? There’s a circus school in London, and it’s such a great workout because it’s also very playful. I love the girl, Katherine Arnold, she taught me, and she teaches over there, as well. So, definitely.
 
 
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G   /   March 15, 2019   /   0 Comments

by Ruben V. Nepales
 
 
LOS ANGELES—“Oooo la-la,” Eva Green cooed when asked about her white lace and black leather dress in our recent interview. “It’s Alexander McQueen,” she said.

Eva stars as Colette Marchant, an aerialist, in Tim Burton’s live action remake of Disney’s animated classic, “Dumbo.”

Colin Farrell, Michael Keaton, Danny DeVito and Alan Arkin are also featured in the endearing tale of a young elephant who can fly.

“I saw the original movie when I was 4 or 5 years old,” recalled the French actress whose eyes are, well, green. They are her best assets. Whether onscreen or in person, Eva mesmerizes with those eyes.

The former Bond Girl will also be seen this year in Alice Winocour’s “Proxima,” which is buzzed as a possible Cannes Film Festival entry in May if its postproduction work is done in time. Eva plays an astronaut who is training to go on a one-year mission in the International Space Station.

The Paris native is also in the cast of Dan Pringle’s science-fiction thriller, “A Patriot,” where she portrays Kate Jones, a Border Corp Captain in the story set in the future.

On television, Eva, who earned quite a following for her Vanessa Ives role in the “Penny Dreadful” series (which will get a spinoff with a different cast), landed the Lydia Wells part in the miniseries, “The Luminaires.” Eve Hewson costars with Eva in the TV adaptation of the novel set in the 1860s gold rush in New Zealand.

Excerpts from our chat:

This is your third movie with Tim Burton. You once gave him a bug specimen for his birthday …
God, it must have been a few years ago. Maybe I got it in The Evolution Store in New York. I can’t remember what it was.

It’s not your hobby to collect bugs?
I used to have a few bugs, but I don’t do that anymore. I’m vegan and I don’t have stuffed things anymore. I’m a good girl now.

What has changed you?
No. I haven’t really changed. People have always put me in the dark category because maybe I have dark hair, or I do intense, complicated movies sometimes.

Some consider you as the muse of Tim Burton now.
I find the term very intimidating. I’m not sure. It’s very flattering, of course, but I’m very honored that he asked for me for a third time. It’s wonderful to be able to play characters that are so different. In “Dark Shadows,” she was kind of a bonkers witch (laughs), a wounded witch. And then, Miss Peregrine, who is a woman-bird. Then here, a trapezist, a clearer character than those in the two other movies I’ve done with him.

How different are these characters from you?
Very different. You are your own instrument. You’re using your own emotions, so it’s part of you. But I’m many things. When people meet me, they think I’m very serious. But I don’t think I am. I’m serious about the craft, but I don’t take myself seriously.

How do you see Tim Burton as a person? Some see him as quirky.
He’s a very nice person. Very grounded. I don’t find him strange. He’s different, maybe. But weird? He’s not weird, he’s just wonderful. He’s very true, very real. He doesn’t lie. And he’s very pure, which is very rare in this business. He’s very passionate, very compassionate, extremely sensitive. He will always be very open to the actors. He really wants to hear what they’re thinking. He wants them to be comfortable.

How do you deal with the paparazzi who sometimes hound you, and fame?
It’s not that bad. I have the ability to make myself invisible, as well.

When did you realize that your mother (actress Marlene Jobert) was famous?
When people asked for her autograph on the street. Or sometimes, if she wanted something special from the bakery, I had to say, “I am the daughter of …,” then people change their attitude. I never liked that. You can see straight away when it’s real or not, when people are really connecting.

What were your memories of going to the circus as a child?
I probably went twice as a child, and I always felt a bit sad. I don’t know if it was the clowns, but there was something. I can’t explain it. Maybe it’s just seeing these wild animals in the circuses. It doesn’t make sense that they are in captivity. I think children could feel that.

What did you learn about your body from playing an aerialist?
I have great appreciation now for the aerialists in the circus, because I am afraid of heights. So, I had to strengthen my arms and overcome my fear of heights. Training was very intense. So, it was a big challenge. I worked intensively with some circus people every day for two to three hours.

Would you like to join the circus?
I’m in the circus every day (laughs).

“Penny Dreadful” gets a new incarnation, “Penny Dreadful: City of Angels.” What do you think of that?
I’m very happy it’s having another life. I don’t really know the story. I know it’s happening in LA in 1938. But yeah, I’m quite nostalgic, as well. Those three years were so intense. It was such a wonderful character, and the character still haunts me.

Bernardo Bertolucci, who directed your film debut, “The Dreamers,” died in November last year. Can you talk about making that film? There was a lot of nudity with you, Michael Pitt and Louis Garrel.
Before doing “The Dreamers,” I had a gigantic poster of “Last Tango in Paris” in my room. I was obsessed. My parents were a bit reluctant when I agreed to do that film, but I read the story. And the sex and nudity was completely justified. It was not gratuitous. And Bernardo was very caring. He never, ever forced us to do anything. He let us be. It was a wonderful experience, and it’s one of my favorite experiences, actually. I was very shy. But when you are out doing the scene, you know it is for the movie. You believe in the movie, and you feel a bit numb. It’s like you forget that you’re naked. You’re in character, and you’re doing a scene.

Do you keep in touch with Louis and Michael?
Yes. We send messages to each other. There’s that strong bond as it was our first movie—a very strong kind of friendship.

Are you like some actors who don’t watch their films?
Oh, God. I never watch my movies. It sounds very narcissistic. But it’s too painful for me because I can’t be objective. It’s just that I feel too self-conscious.

Does your mother talk to you about retiring?
No, she doesn’t. She’s aware that it’s a crazy business. You’re constantly being judged, and you want to be desired, you want to find the next job.
 
 
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G   /   March 12, 2019   /   0 Comments

by Paul Chi
 
 
As Daniel Craig’s final James Bond adventure nears the start of production—and a newly announced release date of April 8, 2020—there are already numerous rumors about who might replace Craig as 007. Game of Thrones alum Richard Madden is speculated to be on the short list, while other reports have long linked Idris Elba to the role—though by now, Elba seems to have made his peace with the fact that he might never play Bond.

There’s even been talk on social media arguing that a woman should play the MI6 agent next, including from Elba himself: a future Bond “could be a woman—could be a black woman, could be a white woman,” he told Variety in 2018. “Do something different with it. Why not?” Actresses including Emilia Clarke, Priyanka Chopra, Gillian Anderson, and Elizabeth Banks have all indicated that they would happily take on a gender-swapped version of the role.

But Eva Green—the French actress who played Vesper Lynd, the Bond girl who broke the British super-spy’s heart in 2006’s Casino Royale—is against the idea of a female 007.

“I’m for women, but I really think James Bond should remain a man. It doesn’t make sense for him to be a woman,” said Green at the premiere of her latest movie, Disney’s Dumbo, in Hollywood on Monday night. “Women can play different types of characters, be in action movies and be superheroes, but James Bond should always be a man and not be Jane Bond. There is history with the character that should continue. He should be played by a man.”

Green echoed a point made previously by Rachel Weisz, who said in 2018 that she would not want to see a female Bond because original author Ian Fleming “devoted an awful lot of time to writing this particular character, who is particularly male and relates in a particular way to women.” Instead, Weisz proposed, “Why not create your own story rather than jumping onto the shoulders and being compared to all those other male predecessors?” “Women are really fascinating and interesting, and should get their own stories,” she continued. And for the record, Bond producer Barbara Broccoli also agrees: “Bond is male,” she said flatly last year. “He’s a male character. He was written as a male and I think he’ll probably stay as a male.”

Although she’s not in favor of a Doctor Who-style gender swap, Green is proud to have helped to change the narrative of female characters in the Bond franchise, moving them from sexy damsels in distress to smart, assertive, and powerful figures.

“I love the fact that the Bond girls have evolved,” said Green, who plays a fearless, high-flying aerialist in Disney’s new live-action reimagining of its beloved 1941 animated tale. “I originally had reservations about being a Bond girl. I didn’t want to be a bimbo. The women are now perceived differently. They are intelligent and sassy and fascinating. I loved playing Vesper. She’s the only one to get to Bond’s heart and has a big impact on his life.”

Green will not reunite with Craig for his final go-around as 007, with director Cary Fukunaga helming the project. Still, she called him the most “iconic” and “visceral” actor to play Bond yet.

“He’s made James Bond human,” she said. “We see him flawed and vulnerable. He’s the best James Bond we have seen.”
 
 
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G   /   October 13, 2018   /   0 Comments

by Craig McLean
 
 
A year after the movie mogul’s disgrace, Bond actor Eva Green speaks for the first time to Craig McLean about surviving in a sexist industry — and why London beats Paris for pubs and trees.

BRITAIN’S favourite witchy actress has been considering the hex that Brexit is casting on the country. She has to. Eva Green is an adoptive Londoner of 13 years’ standing. But, despite that Anglo-sounding surname — and a career-launching role as a cut-glass-accented HM Treasury official in Casino Royale, Daniel Craig’s first outing as James Bond — she’s French.

“For me as a French resident, I’m thinking, what’s going to happen?” ponders Maida Vale-based Green.

“Are they going to kick me out? Do I need to get a British passport? Should I marry an Englishman? No, I won’t go that far,” she jokes.

Does she feel rejected as a European expat living here? “No, because everybody is against it in London. But I’m quite scared, waiting for the tsunami to come. Some people have left already.”

Still, it’s hard to imagine this redoubtable 38-year-old upping sticks for home. For one thing, the Paris-born daughter of a French actress mother and Swedish dentist father has forged a career acting in Anglo-American projects in her second language. Oui, in her next two films she plays Frenchwomen: a single-mother astronaut headed for the International Space Station in Proxima, and a trapeze artist in Dumbo, the live action reimagining of the Disney classic directed by Tim Burton (her third film with the London-based American).

But broadly: “Bond girl” Vesper Lynd, flying sorceress Serafina Pekkala in The Golden Compass, Morgana in TV series Camelot, the titular headmistress in Burton’s Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the witch who curses Johnny Depp in Burton’s Dark Shadows, and the demon-battling Vanessa Ives in Sky Atlantic’s Penny Dreadful are all English-language characters. Not to mention all parts with something of the night about them.

Green — who is considerably more fun in person than her gothic roles would suggest — feels at home here. Having come to London to study at South Kensington’s Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art when she was 17, she’s been based here almost her entire career.

“I love the fact that London is so green. There are so many trees. There are no trees in Paris; well, not many. It’s weird. When I go there I get frustrated.”

That Anglophilia is probably one reason Green has been chosen to star in a short film for classic British car marque: Jaguar.

“Jaguar is such a legend, for a French person anyway,” Green tells me when we meet in a studio near Hanger Lane, the base for the Jaguar shoot. “When you imagine Jaguar you imagine them in old movies, something beautiful and classy. This felt very special — and British special as well.”

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G   /   September 15, 2018   /   4 Comments

Eva’s feature cover and editorial for InStyle Russia’s September 2018 issue has been added to the gallery. We also added an English translation courtesy of our contributor Irina. Thank you to InStyle Russia for providing the scans and to Irina for kindly translating the interview!


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G   /   February 06, 2018   /   10 Comments

Fantastic news everyone! Eva’s amazing twin sister Joy recently granted us an Exclusive Q&A! We thank her for her candidness and kindness for being available to us for this interview. Thank you for reading and feel free to leave some message or comments for Joy, Niccolò and Eva. Enjoy!!
 
We’ve added a Swedish translation of the interview and you can read it HERE.
 
 
Running a vineyard is not a joke, especially during harvest season. What’s a typical day like for you?
 
It is both a period of positive adrenalin and stress all at the same time, especially the days prior to the start of harvest. Once we begin it’s a bit like a marathon, you put your head down and work!! Wine, as you know, is a living thing. Every harvest is a bit like having a new born. It’s fragile and delicate…. since its early stage it already shows its character, its nuances. It’s certainly a very exciting period of the year.

There is no real typical day actually. We all generally wake up very early. Niccolò runs around, from his work as Director of another winery and the vineyards to coordinate the picking and the arrival of the grapes. I prepare the kids for school then I prepare everything at the winery. During harvest, we know when we start and never when the day’s work will be finished…

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G   /   January 08, 2018   /   8 Comments

By Divina Vitale
 
 
What does your work mean to you?
It’s a beautiful art. I find it extremely joyful to be able to play different characters. In true life I am shy, my job allows me to canalize my demons. It is jubilant to be able to “liberate “ myself by performing a role.

Was becoming an actress your dream as a child?
Not at all. At the start I wanted to be an Egyptologist…. But then at age 18 I started taking theater courses and… here I am!!!

The movie The Dreamers was the picture that put you on the spotlights. How important was that role for both your personal and professional growth?
I have wonderful memories of working with the great maestro Bertolucci, it’s most certainly one of my most memorable experiences. It’s thanks to him that I’m still acting today. On the set he was very gentle, respectful and fatherly. When the movie came out , on the other hand, it was a brutal experience. Most journalists wanted to talk about was nudity, when in my opinion there were other more important subjects in the movie …no?

What is your favorite movie?
Cries And Whispers

Is there a role you would have liked to play?
Virginia Woolf

What is your opinion on Weinstein?
I already expressed myself repeatedly on this matter; I would rather not talk about it anymore.

You are of French origins, how difficult was it to be accepted in Hollywood? I bet it hasn’t been an easy task…
In France the film director has full power of decision, unlike in the USA where even a famous professional such as Ridley Scott doesn’t have the last word! For my part the work it’s identical wherever it is an independent movie or a big Hollywood production. You may feel the difference in the budget they dispose for the movie set , the number of actors featuring in the movie… As far as I’m concerned, the hardest part is definitely to train for roles with all the different accents, in different languages, other than my mother tongue.

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G   /   May 28, 2017   /   7 Comments

Eva had a busy day in Cannes yesterday. Her Saturday started with a 10:30am photocall session for D’ Après une histoire vraie (Based on a True Story), followed by a quick interview and an almost hour long press conference at 11:45am. She wrapped her day with a glamorous appearance at the red carpet with director Roman Polanski, co-stars Emmanuelle Seigner and Vincent Perez, composer Alexander Desplat and writers Delphine De Vigan and Olivier Assayas during the world premiere and Hors Compétition (Out of Competition) 6pm screening at the Grand Théâtre Lumière.

For the red carpet premiere, Eva was wearing Alexander McQueen’s silver sequin Shipwreck embroidery black tulle dress from the Spring/Summer 2017 collection. The dress features crashing waves made of embroidered silver sequins and a mixture of beads and finished with cascading bead and metallic fringes. Eva also wore heels from Rupert Sanderson and jewelry from Repossi (Serti Sur Vide earring and rings). She was styled by stylist Nicky Yates while her hair and make-up was done by Ken O’Rourke and Mary Wiles.

Based on a True Story will open on November 1st in France. International release dates to be announced.
 
 




G   /   November 26, 2016   /   2 Comments

We’ve added some new scans from the past few months to the gallery. Enjoy!
 



 
GALLERY LINKS:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Stylist Magazine – November 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > GQ (France) — October 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Grazia (Mexico) – October 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Version Femina (France) – September 26-October 2, 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > The Edit – September 8-15, 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Starpics – September 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > La Cosa Cine (Argentina) – September 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > ELLE (France) – September 30, 2016
 
Thank you to Flo for the La Cosa Cine magazine scans! To contribute or share your personal scans to help enrich our gallery, contact us HERE.




G   /   November 18, 2016   /   6 Comments

By MiNDFOOD
 
 
The elusive Eva takes time to talk to MiNDFOOD about her love of music, what she lives for and where she goes to escape.

Currently starring in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the fabulously glamorous and offbeat Eva Green, 36 (article corrected to Eva’s correct current age as of publication; original article contained the incorrect age of “38”), talks to MiNDFOOD about myriad subjects – from whether she’s ‘hot’ enough for Hollywood to her childhood fear of clowns. A former Bond Girl (Casino Royale) and regular on the TV show, Penny Dreadful, was born in Paris. She exudes an old-fashioned mysterious quality rarely seen in modern actresses, that same quality has guaranteed her a career in film.
 
Miss Peregrine is described as mysterious, smart and tough. Some might would say this was a perfect fit.
(laughs) Well, I like to think so. I try.

What do you like about this beloved literary character?
She’s so cool. She looks after all these gorgeous children and smokes the pipe (laughs). And also, it’s the first time I am not playing the love interest.

Do you smoke?
Not anymore. I used to be a smoker but I stopped 3 years ago.

Thinking about the word peculiar – when have you felt peculiar in your life?
I always felt a bit peculiar. I think lots of people have felt at some point quite different. People say I’m weird but I don’t feel weird – so maybe I am weird! (laughs). I have black hair, I felt strange as a child, I was very shy, scared of going to birthday parties and clowns.

What scares you now?
Oh, God, lots of things in this world. I don’t know where to start. Greed, pollution. Greed mostly.

Do you have any pets?
I have a dog but my sister looks after him. He’s a Border Terrier. His name is Mr. Griffin.

How do you get along with your sister?
My sister lives in Italy so I don’t see her very often but we Skype. She has two beautiful children that I adore. She has a vineyard so she makes her own wine. Yeah, it’s very cool.

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G   /   October 11, 2016   /   0 Comments




G   /   October 10, 2016   /   3 Comments

By Neala Johnson
 
 
“It’s nice,” says Eva Green, “not to play the girlfriend.”

“I don’t want to be the woman in the script where it goes, ‘There’s a beautiful, mysterious woman …’ Just, OK, forget it. I think I would feel unhappy … Some people play it very well but I want to be as equal as a man, you know what I mean?”

Oh, we know what she means.

As far as mysterious girlfriends go, Green played a stunner — to Daniel Craig’s James Bond in his first, bracing outing, Casino Royale.

So impactful was Green’s Vesper Lynd, Bond basically spent the next three films getting over her.

But now the London-based Frenchwoman is over it too. Searching for the word to perfectly capture what she wants to do from here on in, Green finally settles upon “other”.

“It’s exciting to be other.”

If it’s other she wants, Green could wish for no better co-conspirator than Tim Burton.

She teams with the famously eccentric director for a second time on Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, a fantastical adaptation of Ransom Riggs’ best-selling young-adult novel.

Green plays Miss Peregrine, a woman who, while protecting a gaggle of children with unusual abilities from outside threats, also has a peculiarity of her own: as the name suggests, she can transform into a bird.

“I remember Tim called me a year before the shoot. He was like, ‘I’ve got this book, I wonder if you would be interested?’ I was like, ‘Anything, I’d play anything for you’. But he was like, ‘No, no, I want you to read it and see if you like her’.”

A woman-bird who’s handy with a crossbow, has absolutely no love interest and is slightly bonkers? It’s safe to say Green liked her.

“Tim called her Scary Poppins, which I thought was quite funny,” the 36-year-old laughs. “But she’s not a bad, mad woman — it’s all to save her children. She has the ability to transform into a peregrine falcon and because peregrine falcons are the fastest animal on earth, she delivers lines very quickly.

“I watched some documentaries on birds. It was kind of a challenge — I was trying to have little, sharp movements with my head and not much blinking at all, using my hands like claws, my long nails. You always worry that you’re going a bit over the top, but I had a lot of fun … playing her like Mary Poppins on speed.”

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G   /   October 06, 2016   /   1 Comment

By Danny Leigh
 
 
The cast of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children have a tale or two
 
Eva Green: “I was terrified of being the centre of attention”
I’ve always felt a little peculiar. Growing up in Paris I was always quiet. Very shy. I was scared of going to birthday parties, because I couldn’t play games and I didn’t like being in a group. I have a twin sister, and she had that bravery, she could join in with the group. But for me, it was painful.

On my sixth birthday, another girl and I had a shared party, and I was so nervous I vomited. I know how crazy it is – from that terror of being the centre of attention, here I am as an actress. My parents made some home movies when I was three or four and I was already in my own bubble, looking away from the camera, thinking my own thoughts. Now I’ve tamed my demons but if I have to appear as myself in public, it’s hard. Deep down the child is still there.

As a girl, I used to go to the cinema on my own. I hate it when people say the cinema is an escape, as if making small talk about the weather is more real. I loved the films of Ingmar Bergman and also A Room with a View. I saw it first when I was about eight, and I loved it immediately.

At 16, I studied for a year at the American School of Paris, and that was a revelation. The French school system is very judgemental. There, everything was about the pressure to get a certain grade in Maths. Who cares? I don’t remember a thing I did in Maths. But at the American School, the individual was celebrated. I’d never been into fashion, but I would dress up every day, wilder and wilder. I did art, drama, photography, even sports. It was an epiphany for me.

If enough people call you weird, you start to see yourself as weird. But in adult life, it can be a strength, too. And sometimes I do still feel like I belong to a different planet, where all the peculiars should go.

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G   /   October 06, 2016   /   0 Comments

By Naomi Pike
 
 
Eva Green might be a Bond girl, a Hollywood leading lady and a BAFTA winner, but she’ll never forget her first time gracing the cover of Vogue. Green’s debut was almost eight years ago, but she can recall the shoot with Patrick Demarchelier as though it was yesterday.

“He is such a wonderful photographer and it’s effortless as well. It’s timeless and sophisticated and I always love his use of lighting. He’s an artist that doesn’t have an ego. There is a relationship with him – it’s not that I’m an object.” The rapport that the pair share is visible in the black and white images that the shoot produced. She’s laughing and pulling faces, but strikes a glamorous pose in Prada on the cover.

While she might be happy to reminisce over her time shooting for Vogue, one thing she confesses she is “not great” is watching her own films. When we meet she is yet to see Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children, in which she takes the titular role.

Another part of the acting rigmorale that Green prefers to steer away from – and is now in a position to have the option to avoid – is auditioning. “I’m always blessed when I’m not auditioning. I hate auditions. I’m rubbish, actually, and I get so nervous. My heart is about to pop out. It’s a disaster.”

Green is not a person you think of having a nervous disposition. On the red carpet she chooses bold yet ephemeral styles – something that could be linked to the characters she has chosen to play in her over 15 years on screen.

“It’s funny really as I don’t really have time to try on clothes,” she remarks as the conversation turns to the “baroque” aesthetic that she has become synonymous with. For the premiere of the film which marks the second time she has worked with Tim Burton, Green chose a scarlet Elie Saab gown.

However, securing her first choice was a bit more problematic. “I would have loved to wear an original Alexander McQueen dress, because he loved birds,” she reveals. As the name might suggest, her character Miss Peregrine is able to transform into a peregrine falcon, so a feathered gown would have felt particularly apt. “But it’s all in museums,” she sadly confesses.

Green first made a name for herself in Bernardo Bertolucci’s 2003 film The Dreamers, and the now 36-year-old admits that the pressures of being an actress in Hollywood have altered for her. Now it is age as well as “fighting to not play a love interest.”

Green has kept her personal life out of the public eye. Unlike many of her peers, her social-media presence is minimal. Her friends keep trying to persuade her to join Instagram but she fears the intrusion. “I prefer having my own bubble and I would feel too vulnerable to have it exposed. I think I’ve always protected myself quite well but it’s always been tough since day one. That’s the big challenge, and at the same time to remain vulnerable as an actor. Sometimes I just want to say ‘fuck it, I’m going to in the mountains with my animals’ and not to have to deal with all that cruelty.”

They say you should never work with children or animals, but with the majority of the roles in Miss Peregrine being played by those not yet able to even hold a UK driving licence, she was left with little choice. Not that her experience was anything but pleasant. “Sometimes you worry are they going to be focused enough? Are they going to get tired? And actually absolutely all of them were focused, very professional. They were just beautiful. I was so nervous before meeting them because you can feel that they can see through you, and you’re not going to be credible as a strong headmistress-like figure. But there is a grace to children and as an actress that is wonderful to watch. It’s a real inspiration.”

The book that which this film is based on was released for the YA audience 2011, but feels completely at home in the world of Tim Burton. The characters as atypical as the ones most associated with him: Edward Scissorhands, Jack Skellington, the Maitlands.

Much like her feelings for Demarchelier, Green has great affection for Burton. Ahead of this film, the two had previously worked together on 2012’s Dark Shadows.

“He is so easy to work with,” she says warmly. “The wonderful thing about Tim is that he has no ego. He is very kind, normal and fragile. There is something equal with him that I love. Even working with the children he was like ‘What do you think? How do you feel?’ which is so nice. He’s so open to ideas as well. He’s wonderful and amazing.”

As it to be expected in any Burton epic, the visual is as much of a defining characteristic as is the plotline itself. Green’s character is all dark colours, nipped-in waists and striking shoulders. Her signature midnight black hair, which so seduced the camera in Casino Royale, is pinned with a cowlick curl. While her locks might be more on the navy side for this character, in reality Green’s hair is surprisingly little more dramatic than a “mousey” shade, reflecting her Swedish-French roots.

“My dark blonde was actually quite bland,” she confesses, admitting that she has darkened it to have “something happening” since she was a teen. “A friend of my mum had very dark hair. She was from Yugoslavia and I wanted to look like her.”

Besides wanting to look like her mum’s friend, a darker shade did feel more natural for the young actress. But, much like she won’t be defined by the characters she plays, the decision was not as simple as “I am dark, so I should have dark hair”, or a case for wanting to be more easily recognisable. Green admits to possessing the ability to make herself invisible as she walks through London in swathes of scarves and glasses. Unfortunately, with her CV continuing to expand and a beauty as powerful as hers, her anonymity is becoming scarcer and scarcer.
 
 
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G   /   October 06, 2016   /   1 Comment