Archive for the ‘300: Rise of an Empire’ Category
G   /   August 29, 2014   /   4 Comments

Eva Green first made a splash as an actress by appearing nude in Bernardo Bertolucci’s sexually-charged 2003 film, The Dreamers. Now, just over a decade later, the former Bond girl (she played Vesper Lynd in Casino Royale) is again making waves as the oft-naked femme fatale in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, the long-awaited sequel to the original 2005 film. Even the poster for the film was banned in the US for showing the outline of Green’s ample bosom under a white shirt. None of this is of much concern to the fearless French actress, however, who has few qualms about nudity.

“I don’t understand the fuss,” Green says. “No one in Europe pays much attention to nudity, and even though I’m not particularly desperate to show my boobs, I was willing to do it for this film because it’s shot with such artistry and beauty.

“I had to almost forget that I was naked so that I would stop worrying or feeling self-conscious when I was standing naked in front of a crew wearing nothing but a thong. You don’t have any other choice.”

Directed by Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller (the author of the Sin City graphic novels), A Dame to Kill For sees Jessica Alba return to her role as exotic dancer Nancy Callahan who is determined to avenge herself against her tormentors. While Alba once again declined to appear naked, Green’s sensational physique is fully on display as femme fatale Ava Lord whose psychotic delight in sending men to their doom makes this of the most memorable female performances in years.

The visually-stunning, avant-garde film was shot in 3D using green screen technology where the actors worked on a bare set with the background filled in later during the post-production process. The cast includes original Sin City actors Mickey Rourke, Bruce Willis, Rosario Dawson and Benicio Del Toro while Josh Brolin and Joseph Gordon-Levitt join Green as key newcomers.

The 34-year-old Eva Green is also about to start filming the second season of the Showtime TV series, Penny Dreadful, a Victorian era horror/thriller co-starring Timothy Dalton and Josh Hartnett. She will also be seen in The Salvation, a western feature that reunites her with her Casino Royale co-star, Mads Mikkelsen. Some of Green’s recent films include this year’s 300: Rise of an Empire, and Dark Shadows (2012), which co-starred Johnny Depp.

Eva Green (her last name comes from her Swedish dentist father and is pronounced “Gren”) is currently single and lives in the Primrose Hill section of London. Her mother is retired French actress Marlene Jobert. Eva also has a non-identical twin sister, Joy, who is married to an Italian count from the Antinori winemaking family and lives in Normandy.

 

THE INTERVIEW

Q: Eva, your appearance as Ava Lord in this Sin City sequel is causing a minor sensation in the press. Do you think the amount of nudity involved is justified?

GREEN: I wouldn’t have done the film if I didn’t think that the nudity was handled in a beautiful and sensual way… I trusted Robert (Rodriguez). He came to my trailer and swore to me that I would look amazing with the right lighting and shadows. You feel quite vulnerable and exposed of course when you are naked on a set. You also feel silly standing naked with the green screen behind you and you’re all alone on a stage. It’s not that sexy at all when you’re doing scenes naked. But you trust Robert and Frank’s vision and it looks stunning. It’s not vulgar, it’s not indecent – it’s art.

Q: Is the nudity meant to shock audiences?

GREEN: I don’t think so. It’s being faithful to the atmosphere of the graphic novels that Frank Miller wrote and my character is the archetypal femme fatale. Ava uses her body as a means of manipulating men and getting them to do anything she wants.

Nudity is a weapon for her. I’m playing ‘a dame to kill for’ as the title says, and her physical and psychological aura is so strong that she literally drives men so crazy that they are willing to kill or be killed for her.

Q: You’ve done nudity before, including a memorable nude scene in your first film, The Dreamers. Does it bother you that nudity seems to cause so much of a fuss in some countries?

GREEN: I am a bit frustrated with all the talk about my nude or sex scenes. I’m not a porn actress! (Laughs) But sometimes if you’re going to play a character there’s going to be sex involved because that’s a very normal aspect of life and most people are naked when they f**k! Nudity is a lot easier to play than doing a sex scene which can feel cold and mechanical because you’re being told to put your hand here or there or the actor is told to put his hand on your boob and then kiss your breasts and so on. That can be much more awkward although if you’re shooting a sex scene all day it just becomes boring after a while.

Q: Is it fun to play such a dark character like you do in Sin City?

GREEN: You enjoy the sense of power she has. She’s the ultimate kind of man-eater, a total fantasy who changes her personality and behaviour to transform herself into exactly what men desire and what any given man wants her to be. Ava has the kind of power that a lot of women would like to have over men! (Laughs)

She’s a true chameleon and it was interesting to be able to play all the variations of her character – one moment she’s a damsel in distress and the next moment she’s this sensual goddess and then she’s a total bitch. She’s a psychopath with absolutely zero sense of right or wrong and no conscience whatsoever and definitely the most evil woman I’ve ever played or could imagine playing.

Q: What was it like working with such an interesting cast?

GREEN: I was very excited to be asked to do the film. I was cast at the last moment, about a week before shooting started, but I was so happy to be part of it. I was also very happy to get to work with Josh Brolin whom I’ve admired for many years. He brings so much intensity and emotion to his facial expressions and he has these sharp features that are perfect for the extreme character he plays.

Q: The film is shot entirely on a empty set with a green screen in the background. How difficult is it to act with no scenery or props of any kind?

GREEN: It’s very close to being on stage. When you do theatre, the furniture and background is usually very minimal you don’t pay any attention to the props. All your energy is focused on the other actor or actors you’re playing your scene with. That’s how it was making this film. There’s just the crew around you and you have to imagine the setting that’s eventually going to be filled in later. I had read the graphic novels before starting work on the film and so I had a good understanding of the surroundings.

You also get used to miming opening a door or looking in certain directions where something is supposed to be happening or knowing where the walls are supposed to be. It takes a bit of discipline but it also intensifies your work because your entire concentration is on the other actor.

Q: You tend to play extreme characters. Do you think the public has a strange perception of you?

GREEN: (Laughs) Most people have this image of me as a very dark kind of woman or a real bitch. It probably doesn’t help that I like to wear black a lot and that adds to the impression that I’m very cold or distant. I should probably try to play more balanced kinds of characters but often the juiciest roles for women are the darker characters. But it would be nice to do a good love story once in a while although no one thinks of me when it comes to those kinds of films.

Q: Most people don’t know that you’re actually quite fair-haired in real life?

GREEN: I’m fairly blonde. I’ve been dyeing my hair black since I was 15 and I’ve stuck with that look ever since. It’s my way of hiding myself I suppose. I think I look more interesting with dark hair. It’s part of my self-image and we all have a darker side. I like to put masks on sometimes because I haven’t always been that confident and you fall into the trap of continuing to hide your real self even though you’ve changed and grown a lot as an individual. I feel more open but it’s not always easy for me to show that.

Q: Are you a fairly fearless person?

GREEN: Oh, no! I can be confident about some things in my life but I often become very anxious when I’m thinking about a film and I’m not sure how to approach my character. I go up and down. Some days I will feel very strong and determined and other days I will feel lost in life and wondering what I’m doing. I would like to be more like my mum who is much tougher than I am.

Q: You’ve appeared in some big films of late like 300 and Dark Shadows. Do you think A Dame to Kill for will lead to a lot more work for you?

GREEN: I don’t know. I hope so! (Laughs) I always feel it’s a miracle when I get offered any role. I’m surprised that I’m allowed to do this job. Making movies is my way of living out different kinds of fantasies and that’s one of the main reasons I love acting so much.

I’m still trying to be less intellectual in my approach to my work and more instinctual, though. I would like to be more natural in the way I get into my characters and let myself rely on my instincts more. I’m naturally shy and introverted and it’s a side of myself that acting helps me overcome. But it’s a slow process.

Q: You’re often portrayed as a sex symbol and your Sin City film will probably add to that kind of image. How do you feel about that?

GREEN: I have always felt very self-conscious about my appearance. I have never seen myself as being beautiful the way I am sometimes described in the media. Whenever I spend time in Los Angeles I tend to feel ugly compared to all the beautiful women there. It’s not part of the way I see myself at all.

Q: Are you confident when it comes to love?

GREEN: It’s beautiful to feel intense passion but it’s also dangerous. It’s hard to have your heart broken and you want to protect yourself from being hurt again. But you have to be able to grow and learn with each relationship and hope you find love.

Source: Yahoo

G   /   August 27, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Alison Willmore

How the Sin City: A Dame to Kill For actress walked away with the year’s most macho sequels.

Most of the thrill of the original Sin City is gone in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez’s follow-up to their innovative 2005 graphic-novel adaptation, set in a stylized, digitally engineered world of black and white with splashes of color. The movie, which floundered at the box office when it debuted this past weekend, is just as intensely violent, lurid, and nihilistic as the first one, and this time, it’s in 3D, which lends an added oomph to its sometimes beautiful compositions. But Sin City: A Dame to Kill For is also stupefyingly — 100-plus minutes of just the climax of a story, everything turned up to 11, the characters so interchangeably hard-boiled that it can take a while to realize Josh Brolin is actually playing the same character Clive Owen did in the previous film.

It’s disappointing, except for the one thing Sin City: A Dame to Kill For does have that the first installment didn’t: a scene-stealing Eva Green, who, as Ava Lord, burns a giant hole in the center of the screen. In a movie in which Jessica Alba humps a stage and Mickey Rourke plucks out someone’s eyeball like he’s picking a particularly stubborn daisy, it’s not easy to be the center of attention, but Green easily dominates the gritty, gory affair. Her Ava is less femme fatale than dark deity, a goddess of self-destruction who men can’t help but cower in front of.

And Sin City: A Dame to Kill For isn’t the first hyper-macho Frank Miller sequel this year that Green’s walked away with — as Artemisia, the bloodthirsty villain in March’s 300: Rise of an Empire, she totally bowled over the indistinguishable muscly male lead (Sullivan Stapleton, if you’d forgotten). Ever since her 2003 debut alongside Michael Pitt and Louis Garrel in Bernardo Bertolucci’s racy The Dreamers and her 2006 stint as proto-Bond girl Vesper Lynd…

Green’s proven to be a little too much for Hollywood — too formidable for happily-ever-afters, too much presence to be a character actor, too beautiful to be ignored, and too…goth-y? But in 2014, Green’s been carving out a distinctive career for herself as the scariest and most intimidating of sex symbols, and it’s been awesome to watch.

Aside from that graphic-novel green-screen double feature, the Year of Eva Green has included the actress’s acclaimed turn as troubled psychic Vanessa Ives in Showtime’s Penny Dreadful, in which she shifts between serenely enigmatic, vulnerable, and terrifyingly animalistic. She’s also got upcoming roles as a “deliciously unhinged” mother (per Variety) in Gregg Araki’s White Bird in a Blizzard and a ferocious, mute outlaw’s wife in Kristian Levring’s Western The Salvation, both due out later this year. But it’s her parts in the Miller adaptations that particularly stand out, because they manage to feel subversive in an environment that’s almost toxically heavy on the testosterone.

Miller’s near-parodic odes to the toughest of tough guys can’t help but sideline their female characters — his stories are, underneath the blood and sweat, deeply romantic about the business of being masculine in the most archetypal of ways. The men might die for the women, seek solace in them, get them killed, and avenge them, but the women themselves are rarely the focus. And yet…as Artemisia and Ava, Green disrupts this pattern by refusing to be an object who is primarily gazed at or acted upon. In Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, she’s just as sexualized as her fellow female cast members (including Alba, Rosario Dawson, Jaime King, Jamie Chung, and Juno Temple), but she’s fully in control. When she goes to lure her ex Dwight (Brolin) back after leaving him years earlier to marry a rich man, she shows up nude, in his bed, serene in her certainty that she has him. Her sensuality’s presented as a weapon, and he’s resistant and resentful even as he gives in — and the sex scene, which is strenuously athletic and shot in silhouette, ends with him crouched at her feet, like she’s poised to bite his head off, praying mantis-style.

Ava barely bothers to play the victim, rolling her eyes at the ease with which she wins over one of the cops on the case (Christopher Meloni) by playing on his lust and protective instincts. Both Sin City movies do some ludicrous things in the name of “strong female characters” (like the women of Old Town, who are organized, armed, and impossibly tough, but not tough enough to move on from prostitution to more lucrative crime, and who, btw, also frequently have hearts of gold underneath the dominatrix gear). But Green plays Ava as someone who, while psychotic, is also thoroughly in charge, and who deflates some of the grandiosity the film invests in its male characters’ grand gestures of sacrifice and obsession.

Green’s even more fabulously bonkers as Persia’s ruthless top naval commander in 300: Rise of an Empire, now out on DVD and Blu-ray — sprawling on her throne at sea, manipulating Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro) into somehow transforming into a gilded giant, taking the heads of enemies and then making out with them. Artemisia is a survivor of prolonged violence who remakes herself into a fearsome warrior, and the film never really suggests her thirst for revenge is unfounded, making her feel at least as much antiheroine as antagonist.

Halfway through 300: Rise of an Empire, Artemisia and Themistocles meet for a parley that turns, natch, into more crazy sex. It starts with her grabbing his hair and leads to the two slamming each other into various surfaces around the ship before she tosses him out, leaving him stunned when he goes back to his colleagues. Artemisia’s desire, born out of how pleased she is to have found an opponent who can actually match her, drives the whole love-scene-as-battle-metaphor sequence, and it’s not suggested she’s giving up anything or losing stature because she chooses to act on it.

Artemisia is the lone woman in a world of men, but, as played by Green, she’s neither challenged because of this nor acting as just another one of the boys. She’s her own wild creation, unfettered but readily feminine, whether leaping into battle or donning an increasingly intense series of battle ball gowns (culminating in a dress that includes tasteful golden bone-spikes along the spine).

Green commits to her material, no matter how pulpy, which is why this cartoonishly outsized character, a highly fictionalized version of an actual historical figure, comes so vividly to life. She’s not simply hamming it up — she’s as soulful as she is scary.

Green’s so good in these two watered-down sequels that it’s easy to imagine her kept in similar roles going forward — brash, witchy, and doomed. There are worse things that could happen, but she really deserves more, and Penny Dreadful comes closest to showing her range, from demonic force to unguarded romantic lead. And even in the Showtime drama, her character’s formative moment involved the love of a man who couldn’t keep up with her. But being a force of nature shouldn’t condemn someone to wan roles.

Source: Buzzfeed

 

G   /   August 08, 2014   /   2 Comments

M.   /   June 06, 2014   /   14 Comments

Part I can be found over here.

We thank Eva and her twin sister Joy (our intermediary) copiously for making this possible! Enjoy! 😀

6. Who do you think are your best advisors? Agents, friends, family, instinct, …? What is your life motto?

Eva Green: My best advisor is my own instincts, my first impression when I read a script – it’s like love – you can’t explain it, your heart goes boom or not…. My Life’s motto is, “Stay pure in the midst of impurity” (my little fortune from my Yogi teabag from today – very relevant for this crazy business)

7. Briefly describe us an ideal day for you.

Eva Green: My ideal day would be to wake up early, go for a long walk in the mountains, get lost, and escape…

8. After the preparation for “300” have you put more exercise in your life? For example do you go jogging in London?

Eva Green: I don’t have a trainer at home who kicks my ass for four hours every day, so I don’t have the discipline to work out like I would if I were preparing a film… but I do run each morning, more for my head than for my body, I think…

9. What do you consider as the most difficult/unpleasant and the most pleasant part in your job?

Eva Green: The most agreeable part of this job is travelling all over the world, discovering new people and places, you don’t get bored with routine, and the preparation – researching a role, working with my coach, it’s even more rewarding than actually shooting.

The most unpleasant part of the job is that you are constantly doubting yourself because people are continually judging you and as you can’t please everyone, you really need to follow your heart and put earplugs and blinders on sometimes…

10. It’s been almost 10 years after your debut with “The Dreamers”. Looking back at this 10-year career how do you feel? Are there things that you regret? Looking ahead in the future what are your major challenges? What advice would you give to a young actress/actor starting her/his career?

Eva Green: My only regret is that I haven’t done a comedy – a black comedy, of course – but I would really, really love to do something wacky and weird…

— To be continued… —

M.   /   June 05, 2014   /   1 Comment

The French actress would have finally found her niche? She’s back with Penny Dreadful, an American horror TV series. Eva Green reveals her capacity of reinventing herself with genre films.

Gallery link:
– Magazine Scans > GQ (France) – June 2014

M.   /   June 03, 2014   /   17 Comments

We thank Eva and her twin sister Joy copiously for making this possible! Enjoy! 😀

“Dear Eva,

First of all we feel privileged that you so willingly accept to devote some of your scarce free time to complete once again the Q&A session for EvaGreenWeb.com. It says something about your humble character despite your tremendous success. Thank you so much.”

Here are our new questions:

1. After a tiresome period you will at last have some time to relax. What do you enjoy most in these breaks? Being lost in the crowd? Family time? Exotic destinations?

Eva Green: 1. I’m usually exhausted after a shoot, so I go somewhere beautiful to relax like Sri Lanka (I recently climbed “The Sīhāgiri », the Lion Rock, the most amazing view that I have ever seen anywhere), I like going somewhere I can explore, rather than lying down like a turnip on the beach…

2. In “300: Rise of an empire”, even though the critics for the film were controversial, the comments about you were dithyrambic (worldwide). Did you expect it? How do you feel about it? You’re probably going to be a “recherchée” (= in demand, sought-after) for blockbusters in the future. Does it mean “no more indie films”?

Eva Green: You never know how a film will be received and of course that type of film targets an action audience – it was fun to do because I got to train and fight, and Artemisia was a really over the top character… As far as Indie films go, I adore doing them – that’s where my heart is – unfortunately they rarely get the attention they deserve. You always hope when you do an Indie film that it will magically take off and become a huge success…

3. Are you going to visit Comic Con in San Diego for “Sin City 2” as you did last year for “300”?

Eva Green: I don’t know if I’ll be going to Comic Com this year…

4. “Penny Dreadful”: What kind of novelty this TV series brings us? What was actually new for you?

Eva Green: “Penny Dreadful” is set in Victorian London with great characters who interact with some of Literature’s great characters – Frankenstein, Dorian Gray, and Dracula. My character’s name is Vanessa Ives… She is a non-conformist, an individualist, hungry for life, at a time when women were repressed… Vanessa is a kind of magnet in the series, she draws all the other characters around her in their quest to find Sir Malcolm’s daughter…. Vanessa is at war with the demons inside her, possessed by some obscure force but she has such an amazingly strong will that she is able to keep it dormant… Except those times when Temptation arises…. Vanessa exults in the power and freedom her possession has allowed her, but she is alienated and alone because of it…

This role has been the most demanding – on every level – that I have ever done. Vanessa is the most complicated and exciting character that I have ever played.

— To be continued… —

Stef   /   May 19, 2014   /   1 Comment

Gallery link:
– Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > GQ (Italy) – March 2014

M.   /   May 02, 2014   /   6 Comments

Gallery link:
– Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > Empire (UK) – April 2014

M.   /   April 28, 2014   /   9 Comments

Gallery links:
– Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > Total Film (UK) – June 2014
– Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > Total Film (UK) – May 2014
– Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > Studio Cine Live (France) – March 2014
– Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > CIAK (Italy) – April 2014
– Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > Studio Cine Live (France) – April 2014 –> Eva Green, aged 5, playing with a cigarette, the “best accessory for an actor”.

Stef   /   April 14, 2014   /   5 Comments

On her first day on the set of 300: Rise of an Empire, actress Lena Headey knocked on the dressing room door of co-star Eva Green, who had been working on the action film for several weeks.

“I wanted to thank her, she did such a good job holding this down on the female front,” Headey recalls. “She’s a real bad-ass.”

Look out, Greek men. Things have changed in the stylized sword franchise made instantly popular with Zack Snyder’s 300 in 2007.

The original 300 was a showcase for impressively pumped-up male actors including Gerard Butler and Michael Fassbender. But the women are stepping up in the sequel 300: Rise of an Empire (opening Friday).

Game of Thrones star Headey returns as the Spartan Queen Gorgo. But mainly it’s Green’s Artemisia, the revenge-obsessed head of the Persian Navy, who truly steps to the fore with an unquenchable bloodlust — and some show-stopping outfits.

The outfits go from the formidable to the downright scary, including a vest made of human hair (with matching hair wrist bands). “Some of these outfits are bonkers,” says Green. “I love them.”

M.   /   March 15, 2014   /   1 Comment

Gallery link:
Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > Gioia (Italy) – March 22, 2014

Stef   /   March 13, 2014   /   7 Comments

Gallery links:
Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > Primissima (Italy) – March 2014
Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > SciFi #90 (UK) – 2014

M.   /   March 12, 2014   /   1 Comment

Gallery link:
Magazines & Newspapers > 2014 > Tu Style (Italy) – March 17, 2014

Stef   /   March 08, 2014   /   1 Comment

Thanks to Sebastian for some of the new additions.

Gallery links:
Promotional Stills
On the Set

Stef   /   March 08, 2014   /   2 Comments

Thanks to Spot.