Archive for the ‘Casino Royale’ Category
G   /   March 29, 2019   /   0 Comments

G   /   March 27, 2019   /   0 Comments

by Don Kaye
 
 
Eva Green explains why being afraid of heights led her to play a trapeze artist in Tim Burton’s Dumbo.

Dumbo marks French actress Eva Green’s third collaboration with director Tim Burton, following lead roles in Dark Shadows (2012) and Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (2016). In Dumbo she portrays an original character named Colette Marchant, an aerialist who works for — and consorts with — the amusements entrepreneur V.A. Vandevere (Michael Keaton), who aims to buy Max Medici’s circus and its prized flying baby elephant.

Although Colette does not believe Dumbo can fly initially, her first experience with the elephant convinces her otherwise and she becomes sympathetic to both Dumbo and the Farrier family (led by Colin Farrell), who work in the circus and are trying to do their best to protect Dumbo and reunite him with his mother.

With her dark, beguiling appearance and enigmatic air, it’s clear why the often Gothic-minded Burton would want to feature Green in his movies. Aside from her work with the eccentric director, she has played standout roles in both indie and Hollywood fare. Her Vesper Lynd in Casino Royale (2006) was one of the best Bond women ever, while her go-for-broke performance as the Persian navy commander Artemisia in 300: Rise of an Empire was a memorable achievement in an otherwise forgettable movie.

Green is perhaps best known as spiritualist Vanessa Ives in the Showtime horror series Penny Dreadful, one of the many challenging and often unorthodox parts this distinctive actress has played. Den of Geek sat down with Green in Los Angeles recently to discuss getting over her fear of heights, learning how to be a trapeze artist and working with an elephant who wasn’t there.

Is part of the pleasure of acting doing things that you wouldn’t do in your normal life, or becoming people or learning about groups of people or cultures that you wouldn’t learn about?
Absolutely. It’s such a luxury. Not only what I would do if I was not an actor, but it’s so wonderful to be able to learn here, like to learn the aerial work. I played an astronaut a few months ago. It’s just to discover those different worlds, and to be able to exactly get strong, to discover things in your body, or to discover bits of history. I just finished a miniseries in New Zealand about the gold rush in the 19th century, so it’s just such an opportunity to learn so many things.

You started out on this with a fear of heights, right?
Yeah. Really terrified. I mean, I remember on Dark Shadows with Tim, I had one scene where I was on wires, and it was not as high as the work I’ve been doing on this one, but it was still very demanding for me. And then on Miss Peregrine, I just had to do a little leap from a high platform. It was a big deal for me. And now he’s asking me to do this. There must be something with him and heights and me. But, yeah, it was kind of a big, big, big fear. Tim was like, “If it doesn’t work out, it’s okay. We’ll find a way,” and I really worked very hard, but I had the most amazing teachers as well. I’m in awe of them.

When I was a child, I was always a bit uncomfortable when I went to the circus. I mean, I went a couple of times. I don’t know why, but maybe because I felt for those people up there, or the animals. There was something, as a child you can’t put words on it, but you feel like it’s not right that they are in captivity. But now I have a totally different vision. I’ve worked with those people in the same tent almost every day, and they love their craft so much. It’s contagious, and I’ve seen several performances of Cirque du Soleil, which is such a different thing, and so joyous. I mean, these people are just unbelievably amazing.

I was going to ask, what did you come away with from talking to circus people about their lives and profession?
Well, I don’t know, because on this, they were from different circuses. It was not just one circus, but I loved the discipline that they had every day. I trained very early, I remember, like at 7:00 AM, and every day at 7:00, you had the contortionists in one corner, then the man with the knives, and then the acrobats and the clowns. It’s such a hard job, and I admire people who really will go all the way for their craft. They’re very kind, as well. They helped each other. A clown would help a contortionist. It was very moving.

Did you feel changed physically coming out of it? Did the training make you stronger?
I’ve lost most of it, which is dreadful, but I’m going to get back into shape when I get back to London. But, yeah, it was very empowering, of course, and I really saw my body change. Because day after day, I was like, okay, now I need to do that thing. The body is such a great machine. And it’s interesting because I’m somebody who is so cerebral, but your body actually knows how to deal with things. It’s kind of nice to just cut off the head and let the body do things.

Was there any particular scene in the movie that was especially challenging or difficult?
For me, it was all the aerial work, of course. It’s not the most complicated psychological character. It was a big thing for me, and the first time I had to do something quite full on, and then everybody applauded. And I’m not, I don’t want flowers and applause, but that was such a big achievement for me more than any other scene done in any other movies. It was nice.

When you first enter the movie with Michael Keaton, the initial impression is she’s sort of a moll to his character, but we discover she’s a much more sympathetic character. Was it nice to sort of subvert that expectation of what that kind of character could be?
Yeah, exactly. It’s always nice to not be so obvious straight away, to give a first impression. She’s quite enigmatic, and of course she’s Vandevere’s girlfriend, so you think she’s haughty and she doesn’t believe Dumbo can fly. I think once she’s seen him fly, it’s like she’s in. She has that moment of awe, and she gets close to Holt and the children, and that said, she’s on Dumbo’s side and will help him.

You’ve done a lot of films that have a lot of extensive visual effects in them. Does it get any easier to work with a main character who is not there?

I mean, yeah, I’ve worked a lot with green screen, like fake surroundings. But to really interact with a being, I’ve never had to do that before, and that was very abstract. Tim had drawings. We had a plastic thing. We had him. His name was George actually. It’s a bit confusing, but, yeah. We had George the Elephant, and then we had a man in a green suit that it was helpful to know, okay, he’s touching me. It was kind of real. And then for me for the flying stuff, it was kind of a mechanical machine that kind of moves. It’s quite jerky actually, and you had to really hang on.

Like one of those mechanical broncos in the cowboy bars.
Totally. It’s the same thing, and then it’s extended on an arm. Exactly the same, yeah.

Do you remember seeing the original film as a child?
Yeah. It was a long time ago, but, yeah. I remember really the mother and the child being separated, and how heartbreaking it was, and beautiful. And I love those old Disney movies like Snow White, Bambi, and I love the fact that Disney was brave to tackle those kind of dark subjects because I feel like fairy tales can be a wonderful teaching tool as well. And I think children also sometimes like to be a tiny bit scared. It makes it quite exciting.

What do you think makes it relevant today? I mention that also because there were a couple of references in this movie to not having the animals in captivity.
Yeah. I mean, animals should never perform in captivity. We should not have aquatic shows. In America, it still exists, and I think we’ve seen in documentaries like Blackfish and things like that, that these beings have souls, and they cannot be in captivity. I just hope this movie kind of makes people want to care for those wild animals, and want to stand up against poaching, and protect them.

This is the third time you’ve worked with Tim. You’ve worked with a lot of great directors. What makes him distinctive in his style of filmmaking?
It’s always kind of bigger than life. Everything is colorful, and there’s always that mixture of humor and haught, and it’s always fun because I’ve always been a big fan, so I can’t believe I’ve worked with him three times. But it’s just that you know that it’s going to be a character that’s going to be “other,” that is something that you’ve never played before, and that’s always very exciting for an actor.

Dumbo is out in theaters this Friday (March 29).

 
 
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G   /   March 19, 2019   /   0 Comments

by Brian Davids
 
 
After inspiring James Bond’s Vesper martini, Eva Green is flying high yet again thanks to Tim Burton’s Dumbo.

As positive social media reactions roll in for Disney’s live-action reimagining of its classic animated film, Green has a lot to be proud of as she not only flew Dumbo but conquered her deep-rooted fear of heights in the process. The Casino Royale star plays aerialist Colette Marchant, and much to Green’s dismay, director Tim Burton requested that she perform some of Colette’s aerial stunts.

After a couple months of rigorous training alongside circus performers and acrobats, Green realized that she just might be able to pull off the impossible.

This is Green’s third collaboration with Burton, and the actor has become known for stepping into highly stylized worlds. But she first broke out in a grounded and hard-edged reboot, 2006’s Casino Royale. Green’s star-making role of Vesper Lynd helped launch the Daniel Craig era of Bond films, and her performance still has many 007 enthusiasts ranking her as the preeminent “Bond girl.”

Oddly enough, Green nearly missed out on her breakout role after turning down an audition nine months prior to actually getting the part. By the time producers returned to Green, production was looming and Angelina Jolie and Charlize Theron were also in the running.

“I was probably a bit stupid or naive. I said, ‘Ugh, a Bond girl? What kind of prissy girl is that?’ They also kept the script secret,” Green tells The Hollywood Reporter. “So it wasn’t until they gave me the script [nine months later] that I realized it was a meaty role. I didn’t see her as a Bond girl. She’s a strong character; she’s got cracks.”

In a conversation with THR, Green opens up about working with Tim Burton for the third time, her reluctance to return to her native French accent for Dumbo, and her fondness for Bond producer Barbara Broccoli.

Clearly, you thrive alongside Tim Burton since Dumbo is your third film together. What makes his sets such a fertile environment for you to create?
First of all, he’s such a kind man. You feel safe as he always wants the actors to feel comfortable. There’s never any judgement or anything like that. His sets are very playful. You don’t have the pressure or the tension that you might have on other projects. He just trusts you; he lets you be free. He also has a very particular way of communicating as well. He would draw and say, “This is how I see the scene.” Suddenly, off we go. It’s just a fun way to be working.

Would you say that he’s an actor’s director? Does he spend a lot of time on performance?
He’s not the king of words, and I, myself, am not the queen of words. He is a more physical director; he speaks with his hands. You kind of understand what he wants with the vibe that he exudes. It’s a very particular way of working, and it’s difficult to explain, exactly. It’s more visceral.

With the exception of Dumbo himself, this film was mostly shot in-camera by way of practical sets and effects. I presume fully realized sets only complement your performance?
Totally. The sets were so complete, which is quite rare. Now most sets are very minimal with lots of greenscreen and just a few props. But with Dumbo, you felt like you were going back to the golden era of Hollywood. It was so big with all the extras — and very colorful and vibrant. We even had a jazz band so you could really get into the mood. When all the characters are in the car and driving through Dreamland, it was really, really magical.

Do you find a personal connection to your characters including your Dumbo character, Colette Marchant?
As an actor, you always use your own self. It’s your instrument; it’s your body. Of course, there are bits of me in her. It’s an interesting character; it’s also somebody that I’ve never played before. It’s somebody much clearer and lighter than the characters I’ve played in the past. She’s fun to play; she’s haughty and cold at the beginning. And then she gets to see Dumbo fly, which changes absolutely everything. She will do absolutely anything to help Dumbo and reunite him with his mum. It’s a very sweet story, and Colette is a fun, playful character.

You’re afraid of heights, and yet you’re playing an aerialist. You actually did some of Colette’s trapeze artistry in the film. Were these stunts as terrifying as you expected? Do you ever forget about your own fears when in character?
My fear of heights and swinging is really serious. Even as a child, I couldn’t get on swings at 4 years old. It was a real issue. Roller coasters — I couldn’t do any of that. So when Tim said I would have to do some of my own stunts, I kind of panicked. (Laughs.) He said, “You’re gonna train for a couple months with circus performers, and we’ll see how we go.” I was secretly hoping that, at the end, he’d use the body of an acrobat and add my head in post (Laughs.). But then I started training seriously — three to four hours per day — with those amazing trainers and acrobats. Little by little, I got higher and higher. It was a very hard thing because it requires a lot of strength as well; it’s not just fear. So, on top of it, you have to get really strong –– core and arms. The circus people were just so dedicated and gave me lots of confidence. We went quite step-by-step, and I can’t believe I managed to do those things. I always thought I would be afraid of heights for life, and it’s really in facing my fear that I was able to overcome it. I’m very proud of myself on that one.

Throughout your career, you’ve trained to control your French accent in order to play British and American characters. Since you return to your native French accent in Dumbo, is it more difficult than it should be since you’ve spent so much time trying to neutralize or unlearn your French accent?
It’s funny because I remember I had a lot of pressure from the studio on Casino Royale to get a British accent. So I worked really hard to get rid of my French-ness. Now I live in London, so to go back to the French thing would be unnatural. When Tim said, “She’s a very French character, and it would add some color if you had a French accent.” And I said, “No, I can’t go there!” (Laughs.) It’s interesting because it’s actually the perfect accent for Colette. It helped me to create who she is. It suddenly changes everything when you have an accent. As an actor, it’s really wonderful to be able to play with your voice; you get out of yourself. So, that was actually very helpful.

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G   /   March 12, 2019   /   0 Comments

by Paul Chi
 
 
As Daniel Craig’s final James Bond adventure nears the start of production—and a newly announced release date of April 8, 2020—there are already numerous rumors about who might replace Craig as 007. Game of Thrones alum Richard Madden is speculated to be on the short list, while other reports have long linked Idris Elba to the role—though by now, Elba seems to have made his peace with the fact that he might never play Bond.

There’s even been talk on social media arguing that a woman should play the MI6 agent next, including from Elba himself: a future Bond “could be a woman—could be a black woman, could be a white woman,” he told Variety in 2018. “Do something different with it. Why not?” Actresses including Emilia Clarke, Priyanka Chopra, Gillian Anderson, and Elizabeth Banks have all indicated that they would happily take on a gender-swapped version of the role.

But Eva Green—the French actress who played Vesper Lynd, the Bond girl who broke the British super-spy’s heart in 2006’s Casino Royale—is against the idea of a female 007.

“I’m for women, but I really think James Bond should remain a man. It doesn’t make sense for him to be a woman,” said Green at the premiere of her latest movie, Disney’s Dumbo, in Hollywood on Monday night. “Women can play different types of characters, be in action movies and be superheroes, but James Bond should always be a man and not be Jane Bond. There is history with the character that should continue. He should be played by a man.”

Green echoed a point made previously by Rachel Weisz, who said in 2018 that she would not want to see a female Bond because original author Ian Fleming “devoted an awful lot of time to writing this particular character, who is particularly male and relates in a particular way to women.” Instead, Weisz proposed, “Why not create your own story rather than jumping onto the shoulders and being compared to all those other male predecessors?” “Women are really fascinating and interesting, and should get their own stories,” she continued. And for the record, Bond producer Barbara Broccoli also agrees: “Bond is male,” she said flatly last year. “He’s a male character. He was written as a male and I think he’ll probably stay as a male.”

Although she’s not in favor of a Doctor Who-style gender swap, Green is proud to have helped to change the narrative of female characters in the Bond franchise, moving them from sexy damsels in distress to smart, assertive, and powerful figures.

“I love the fact that the Bond girls have evolved,” said Green, who plays a fearless, high-flying aerialist in Disney’s new live-action reimagining of its beloved 1941 animated tale. “I originally had reservations about being a Bond girl. I didn’t want to be a bimbo. The women are now perceived differently. They are intelligent and sassy and fascinating. I loved playing Vesper. She’s the only one to get to Bond’s heart and has a big impact on his life.”

Green will not reunite with Craig for his final go-around as 007, with director Cary Fukunaga helming the project. Still, she called him the most “iconic” and “visceral” actor to play Bond yet.

“He’s made James Bond human,” she said. “We see him flawed and vulnerable. He’s the best James Bond we have seen.”
 
 
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G   /   November 26, 2016   /   2 Comments

We’ve added some new scans from the past few months to the gallery. Enjoy!
 



 
GALLERY LINKS:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Stylist Magazine – November 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > GQ (France) — October 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Grazia (Mexico) – October 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Version Femina (France) – September 26-October 2, 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > The Edit – September 8-15, 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Starpics – September 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > La Cosa Cine (Argentina) – September 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > ELLE (France) – September 30, 2016
 
Thank you to Flo for the La Cosa Cine magazine scans! To contribute or share your personal scans to help enrich our gallery, contact us HERE.

G   /   November 18, 2016   /   6 Comments

By MiNDFOOD
 
 
The elusive Eva takes time to talk to MiNDFOOD about her love of music, what she lives for and where she goes to escape.

Currently starring in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the fabulously glamorous and offbeat Eva Green, 36 (article corrected to Eva’s correct current age as of publication; original article contained the incorrect age of “38”), talks to MiNDFOOD about myriad subjects – from whether she’s ‘hot’ enough for Hollywood to her childhood fear of clowns. A former Bond Girl (Casino Royale) and regular on the TV show, Penny Dreadful, was born in Paris. She exudes an old-fashioned mysterious quality rarely seen in modern actresses, that same quality has guaranteed her a career in film.
 
Miss Peregrine is described as mysterious, smart and tough. Some might would say this was a perfect fit.
(laughs) Well, I like to think so. I try.

What do you like about this beloved literary character?
She’s so cool. She looks after all these gorgeous children and smokes the pipe (laughs). And also, it’s the first time I am not playing the love interest.

Do you smoke?
Not anymore. I used to be a smoker but I stopped 3 years ago.

Thinking about the word peculiar – when have you felt peculiar in your life?
I always felt a bit peculiar. I think lots of people have felt at some point quite different. People say I’m weird but I don’t feel weird – so maybe I am weird! (laughs). I have black hair, I felt strange as a child, I was very shy, scared of going to birthday parties and clowns.

What scares you now?
Oh, God, lots of things in this world. I don’t know where to start. Greed, pollution. Greed mostly.

Do you have any pets?
I have a dog but my sister looks after him. He’s a Border Terrier. His name is Mr. Griffin.

How do you get along with your sister?
My sister lives in Italy so I don’t see her very often but we Skype. She has two beautiful children that I adore. She has a vineyard so she makes her own wine. Yeah, it’s very cool.

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G   /   October 11, 2016   /   0 Comments

G   /   October 10, 2016   /   3 Comments

By Neala Johnson
 
 
“It’s nice,” says Eva Green, “not to play the girlfriend.”

“I don’t want to be the woman in the script where it goes, ‘There’s a beautiful, mysterious woman …’ Just, OK, forget it. I think I would feel unhappy … Some people play it very well but I want to be as equal as a man, you know what I mean?”

Oh, we know what she means.

As far as mysterious girlfriends go, Green played a stunner — to Daniel Craig’s James Bond in his first, bracing outing, Casino Royale.

So impactful was Green’s Vesper Lynd, Bond basically spent the next three films getting over her.

But now the London-based Frenchwoman is over it too. Searching for the word to perfectly capture what she wants to do from here on in, Green finally settles upon “other”.

“It’s exciting to be other.”

If it’s other she wants, Green could wish for no better co-conspirator than Tim Burton.

She teams with the famously eccentric director for a second time on Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, a fantastical adaptation of Ransom Riggs’ best-selling young-adult novel.

Green plays Miss Peregrine, a woman who, while protecting a gaggle of children with unusual abilities from outside threats, also has a peculiarity of her own: as the name suggests, she can transform into a bird.

“I remember Tim called me a year before the shoot. He was like, ‘I’ve got this book, I wonder if you would be interested?’ I was like, ‘Anything, I’d play anything for you’. But he was like, ‘No, no, I want you to read it and see if you like her’.”

A woman-bird who’s handy with a crossbow, has absolutely no love interest and is slightly bonkers? It’s safe to say Green liked her.

“Tim called her Scary Poppins, which I thought was quite funny,” the 36-year-old laughs. “But she’s not a bad, mad woman — it’s all to save her children. She has the ability to transform into a peregrine falcon and because peregrine falcons are the fastest animal on earth, she delivers lines very quickly.

“I watched some documentaries on birds. It was kind of a challenge — I was trying to have little, sharp movements with my head and not much blinking at all, using my hands like claws, my long nails. You always worry that you’re going a bit over the top, but I had a lot of fun … playing her like Mary Poppins on speed.”

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G   /   October 06, 2016   /   0 Comments

By Naomi Pike
 
 
Eva Green might be a Bond girl, a Hollywood leading lady and a BAFTA winner, but she’ll never forget her first time gracing the cover of Vogue. Green’s debut was almost eight years ago, but she can recall the shoot with Patrick Demarchelier as though it was yesterday.

“He is such a wonderful photographer and it’s effortless as well. It’s timeless and sophisticated and I always love his use of lighting. He’s an artist that doesn’t have an ego. There is a relationship with him – it’s not that I’m an object.” The rapport that the pair share is visible in the black and white images that the shoot produced. She’s laughing and pulling faces, but strikes a glamorous pose in Prada on the cover.

While she might be happy to reminisce over her time shooting for Vogue, one thing she confesses she is “not great” is watching her own films. When we meet she is yet to see Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children, in which she takes the titular role.

Another part of the acting rigmorale that Green prefers to steer away from – and is now in a position to have the option to avoid – is auditioning. “I’m always blessed when I’m not auditioning. I hate auditions. I’m rubbish, actually, and I get so nervous. My heart is about to pop out. It’s a disaster.”

Green is not a person you think of having a nervous disposition. On the red carpet she chooses bold yet ephemeral styles – something that could be linked to the characters she has chosen to play in her over 15 years on screen.

“It’s funny really as I don’t really have time to try on clothes,” she remarks as the conversation turns to the “baroque” aesthetic that she has become synonymous with. For the premiere of the film which marks the second time she has worked with Tim Burton, Green chose a scarlet Elie Saab gown.

However, securing her first choice was a bit more problematic. “I would have loved to wear an original Alexander McQueen dress, because he loved birds,” she reveals. As the name might suggest, her character Miss Peregrine is able to transform into a peregrine falcon, so a feathered gown would have felt particularly apt. “But it’s all in museums,” she sadly confesses.

Green first made a name for herself in Bernardo Bertolucci’s 2003 film The Dreamers, and the now 36-year-old admits that the pressures of being an actress in Hollywood have altered for her. Now it is age as well as “fighting to not play a love interest.”

Green has kept her personal life out of the public eye. Unlike many of her peers, her social-media presence is minimal. Her friends keep trying to persuade her to join Instagram but she fears the intrusion. “I prefer having my own bubble and I would feel too vulnerable to have it exposed. I think I’ve always protected myself quite well but it’s always been tough since day one. That’s the big challenge, and at the same time to remain vulnerable as an actor. Sometimes I just want to say ‘fuck it, I’m going to in the mountains with my animals’ and not to have to deal with all that cruelty.”

They say you should never work with children or animals, but with the majority of the roles in Miss Peregrine being played by those not yet able to even hold a UK driving licence, she was left with little choice. Not that her experience was anything but pleasant. “Sometimes you worry are they going to be focused enough? Are they going to get tired? And actually absolutely all of them were focused, very professional. They were just beautiful. I was so nervous before meeting them because you can feel that they can see through you, and you’re not going to be credible as a strong headmistress-like figure. But there is a grace to children and as an actress that is wonderful to watch. It’s a real inspiration.”

The book that which this film is based on was released for the YA audience 2011, but feels completely at home in the world of Tim Burton. The characters as atypical as the ones most associated with him: Edward Scissorhands, Jack Skellington, the Maitlands.

Much like her feelings for Demarchelier, Green has great affection for Burton. Ahead of this film, the two had previously worked together on 2012’s Dark Shadows.

“He is so easy to work with,” she says warmly. “The wonderful thing about Tim is that he has no ego. He is very kind, normal and fragile. There is something equal with him that I love. Even working with the children he was like ‘What do you think? How do you feel?’ which is so nice. He’s so open to ideas as well. He’s wonderful and amazing.”

As it to be expected in any Burton epic, the visual is as much of a defining characteristic as is the plotline itself. Green’s character is all dark colours, nipped-in waists and striking shoulders. Her signature midnight black hair, which so seduced the camera in Casino Royale, is pinned with a cowlick curl. While her locks might be more on the navy side for this character, in reality Green’s hair is surprisingly little more dramatic than a “mousey” shade, reflecting her Swedish-French roots.

“My dark blonde was actually quite bland,” she confesses, admitting that she has darkened it to have “something happening” since she was a teen. “A friend of my mum had very dark hair. She was from Yugoslavia and I wanted to look like her.”

Besides wanting to look like her mum’s friend, a darker shade did feel more natural for the young actress. But, much like she won’t be defined by the characters she plays, the decision was not as simple as “I am dark, so I should have dark hair”, or a case for wanting to be more easily recognisable. Green admits to possessing the ability to make herself invisible as she walks through London in swathes of scarves and glasses. Unfortunately, with her CV continuing to expand and a beauty as powerful as hers, her anonymity is becoming scarcer and scarcer.
 
 
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G   /   October 04, 2016   /   2 Comments

As Eva Green reunites with Tim Burton on the big screen, the former Bond girl chats to Susan Griffin about playing ‘Scary Poppins’ and her memories of Casino Royale, a decade on…

Eva Green is lamenting her age. “I feel old,” she exclaims when asked how it feels to mark a decade since the release of Casino Royale, the Bond movie that marked Daniel Craig’s debut as 007.

Green played Bond girl Vesper Lynd, a role she’s “proud” to have tackled, although she was tentative when first approached.

In her head, she no doubt had visions of playing bikini-clad arm candy, so was pleasantly surprised to hear the outline for the character: a foreign liaison agent who beguiles Bond but whose deception ultimately leads to her demise.

“Vesper was an enigmatic character, but very human, very sensitive, and it was mainly the love story that was very appealing to me in that one,” remarks the 36-year-old actress, beautiful yet delicate-looking in floor-length black lace.

Green was born in Paris but speaks in an acutely-enunciated English accent, her blue-green eyes defined by layers of smoky eye shadow. She’s friendly, but not someone who will fill the air with unnecessary and inane chatter.

The rumours continue as to whether Craig will step down from the role following his fourth outing in last year’s Spectre.

Does she think it’s time for him to hang up the tuxedo?

“I don’t know,” ponders Green. “He does what he wants, but he’s such a wonderful Bond because he’s so in his body. He’s sexy, raw and rugged.”

Since her debut screen role in Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Dreamers in 2003, where she and her co-stars, Michael Pitt and Louis Garrel, spent a large proportion of their screen-time naked, the actress has forged a reputation for playing empowered women, entirely confident in their own skin. But they’re not all femme fatales, she notes, as is often perceived.

“I played a femme fatale 100 per cent in [2014’s] Sin City: A Dame To Die For, there are not many dimensions, she’s like a psychopath,” notes Green, who studied acting in London and directing in New York, and won the Bafta Rising Star Award in 2007.

“In the other roles I’ve played – some of the roles anyway – they’re strong women, but there is more behind the strong facade. There are cracks in the armour and they’re quite complex.”

Her Bond role aside, Green’s standout performances include Sibylla, Queen of Jerusalem in Ridley Scott’s A Kingdom Of Heaven, warrior Artemisia in 300: Rise Of An Empire, and the possessed Vanessa Ives in the horror series Penny Dreadful.

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G   /   October 01, 2016   /   1 Comment

By Donna Freydkin
 
 
French actress Eva Green exudes a mysterious, cool edge. And it’s put to perfect use in “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children,” with Green playing the pipe-smoking headmistress of a haven for odd kids — those who defy gravity, or house a beehive within themselves, for example.

Green, who most recently embodied seductive, sultry and powerful Vanessa Ives in Showtime’s horror drama “Penny Dreadful,” approached the role in the Tim Burton film with one guiding principle: “That of a dark Mary Poppins. I spoke quite fast. There’s something very sharp and precise about her. No messing around. The bird movements. It could go wrong quickly – that was my worry,” says Green.

She fully embraced her character, who has the same habit as many a detective. “I had two pipes. I kept one of them. I learned how to smoke them. There’s an art to it. It’s a delicate art. It helps me as well to bring a virility to her. It’s such a cool prop,” she says.

Miss Peregrine can transform into a falcon. And she has her own power: the ability to stop time and live in an endless loop. Would Green ever want to do that in real life?

“I don’t think so. The idea of being stuck and being forced to relive things, it’s quite scary. But of course, if it’s a nice holiday – today, I’d like to go to this wonderful holiday in Africa I’d been to,” she says.

It was a vacation that changed her life. “I went to Africa on my own. It’s a bit strange. But I loved it. It was unbelievable. I was scared at the beginning. What am I doing? After a while, there’s something you learn about yourself but only if you’re on your own. There’s something so free about that. It’s empowering,” says Green.

Green broke out in “The Dreamers,” the 2003 deeply erotic film by Bernardo Bertolucci. She went on to play Vesper Lynd in 2006’s “Casino Royale” and Ava Lord in Frank Miller’s and Robert Rodriguez’s “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For.”

But at no time in her career has she played the bland girlfriend, or the chipper spouse, or the pretty, wide-eyed arm candy. She has no plans to start now.

“I’ve never really played the love interest. I’ve never, ever accepted a role like that. But here it was nice to have a different goal, to have those children to look after. I love playing the protector,” she says. “I like characters who are complex. That’s why people sometimes say it’s dark. I don’t know what that means. It’s complex. Life is not rosy.”

Like actresses of yore, Green cultivates an air of mystery about herself. She is not on social media. She doesn’t do much press. And she doesn’t air her romantic dirty laundry in public.

“I feel like I’m old school,” she says of Twitter and Instagram. “It’s kind of scary. I could get addicted as well and I don’t want to get there. I understand that sometimes those media are good for a cause, or political things, for your work, that I understand. But to say you picked your nose at 4:30, that’s alien to me. You don’t want to give too much away. Look at me!”
 
 
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G   /   September 28, 2016   /   0 Comments

By Donald Clarke
 
 
The Penny Dreadful star takes a break from psychic meltdowns as the eponymous lead in Tim Burton’s new film Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
 
“It’s so great to hear the accent,” Eva Green says to me. “Where in Ireland are you from?”

Dunno. Blftnbrgh. Sgrlingham. What’s my name again?

Green has that sort of presence. Over the last decade or so, after debuting in Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Dreamers, the French actor has become our era’s most potent purveyor of gothic glamour. Nobody else does what she does. Nobody else can lower her brow and stare as if focussing the wrath of a thousand unsettled souls (or something). You get quite a bit of that in her performance as the title character in Tim Burton’s imminent Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children.

“I am so sick of this femme fatale thing,” she says in a perky voice. “I don’t know what it means. I suppose I played one in Sin City – 100 percent evil. I see that. But Penny Dreadful is dark and tormented. That’s different. There are many layers to that. I find that very meaty. So maybe I should dye my hair blonde and do an American comedy.”

I had read that she was actually a natural blonde.

“Yes! That’s right. I am a dark blonde. I think I need to be careful. I don’t want to be seen as being too sophisticated.”

I must apologise. You probably didn’t want to read that Eva Green – recently so distraught and demented on the TV series Penny Dreadful – turns out to be in no way intimidating. This is, however, very much the case. She looks magnificent. Wearing something black and diaphanous, the trademark eye make-up shockingly in place, she is unlikely to be ignored in a crowd. But she is still very much up for a nice chat.

“Ireland is so real and funny,” she almost gushes. “I shot the movie Cracks there. I always had a happy time. Then three years of Penny Dreadful. And Camelot. I feel like I have something Irish thing going on within me.”

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M.   /   July 15, 2016   /   3 Comments


Photographers: Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott
Stylist: Edward Enninful
Hair: Shay Ashual
Make-Up: DickPage
Manicure: Naomi Yasuda
Set Design: Andrea Stanley

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– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > W Magazine – August 2016

G   /   July 08, 2016   /   3 Comments

by Drew McWeeny

The first real rabid Penny Dreadful fan I talked to was Greg Ellwood here at HitFix. He was a steadfast believer the entire time it was on the air, and he encouraged me to watch it. I was busy cutting the cord, though, moving away from cable subscriptions. I had no cable in the house, none in my office, and chose not to watch anything on TV. I used Hulu, Netflix, HBO Now, Amazon Prime. And if a show didn’t land in one of the services I used, then it just went on a list of things to watch someday. Maybe.

Today is that day for Penny Dreadful for me. After Greg, the person who really picked up that ongoing advocacy for the show was Brian Duffield, who shares my deep abiding love of Eva Green’s work, and he has always been insistent that I was missing some of her very best work by not finding a way to watch the show. I couldn’t justify all of the expense for one title, though. I just waited, and when I moved into my new apartment this week, I finally reversed course, buying a cable/Internet bundle with a very healthy On Demand library. I checked to see if I had a Showtime folder, and then checked to see if they had all of the Penny Dreadful episodes, and just as I got excited about that, Netflix also added the series, although only the first two seasons.

It was suddenly abundantly available and so I put on the first one this morning while working, and that rolled right into the second one, and all of a sudden, there was Eva Green, and there was this seance, and she grabbed this script by the neck and cracked it open and drank the marrow and never once blinked, damn near staring the audience down, daring them to look away.

That’s Eva Green, though. From the moment she appeared in The Dreamers thirteen years ago, she made it clear that she was no one’s fantasy, no one’s object, no one’s simple fantasy. She is willing to follow a good piece of material anywhere, and watching her tear into good writing is one of the great pleasures of film these days. When I spoke to her about her work in 300: Rise Of An Empire, I was practically levitating because it’s such a knowing, accomplished piece of work. She read that script, she got exactly how to make that character spring to vivid life, and she dug in unabashedly. I don’t think Sin City: A Dame To Kill For is very good, but she positively skins it. She leans into the stereotypes that Frank Miller’s using and she twists them all into her own particular versions of them. When she played “the Bond girl” in Casino Royale, she ended up making Vesper into something just as morally and emotionally complicated as the original Ian Fleming conception of the character, if not more so.

Tim Burton’s Dark Shadows has 99 problems, but Eva Green ain’t one. She showed up to that film to play, and she owns Johnny Depp in every scene in the film. Seems apt. In a world where men get to be character actors for decades, building rich galleries of portrayals of a wide range of types and voices and backstories, women are often relegated to teasing out variations on a fairly limited range of roles. Eva Green has never allowed herself to be held back by that, though, and when a filmmaker understands just what a rich collaborator Green can be, it seems like there’s no limit to the rewards that the finished film will reap. She should have the kind of career Depp has, and it seems like she is forcing the industry to bend to that idea instead of her having to give up and just take the girlfriend or wife roles like everyone else.

Today is her birthday, and I don’t particularly care what number it is. What I care about is watching the rest of this series in the weeks ahead, and savoring the way a TV show, especially today as the caliber of writing seems to have risen across the board, allows a great actor to do something they can never do in film, living in a character’s skin over time, building in a million details that make the character even more vivid, even more real. And if I could give her one birthday present, it would be the promise that no one will ever do to her work what Ridley Scott did when he cut the theatrical version of Kingdom Of Heaven in 2005. Her character had a son in the film who played an essential role, but when Scott was pushed to create a theatrical version of the film that was an acceptable length, he chose to cut her son from the movie completely, and it destroyed her character in a way that was remarkable. It was only once I saw the longer cut that I realized just how impressive her work was, and how much William Monahan had given her to do. Here’s hoping that as she continues to move from role to role, filmmakers rise to the challenge and they write strong, smart, eccentric roles for her to play. I’m looking forward to seeing her play Miss Peregrine in Tim Burton’s Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children, and you can see the latest trailer for it below. But I want more for her. I want her to conquer. I want her to find a filmmaker who is excited by what she brings to a collaboration. I want Hollywood to deserve her.

In the meantime, I’ve got lots more Penny Dreadful to get to. Celebrate her birthday right and join me if you’re also been missing out.

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G   /   June 27, 2016   /   4 Comments

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