Archive for the ‘Casino Royale’ Category
G   /   May 06, 2016   /   0 Comments

By Stuart Jeffries

 

The star of gothic fantasy Penny Dreadful talks about the risks – and pleasures – of acting on the dark side

Only very beautiful women and, perhaps, motorcycle couriers can get away with leather trousers. Detective Saga Norén in The Bridge? Just about. Ronan Keating? Not so much.

These thoughts occur as I’m introduced to Eva Green at an apparently select members’ club in the gothic revival St Pancras Renaissance hotel in London. She’s wearing black boots, black leather trousers, tailored black singlet, has long, dyed-black hair and lots of black eye makeup.

“I am a vampire,” she laughs, as we retire to a sofa in a darkened corner, “and I never expose myself to the sun. I have very fine skin, you see.” She daily applies suncream (factor 30 or 50) under her makeup.

Green is drawn to the dark side in other ways. The 35-year-old French actor is in London to promote her role as gaunt, statuesque, demonically possessed, cheeks-sucked-in-so-much-it-must-hurt-after-a-hard-day’s-shooting clairvoyant Vanessa Ives in Sky series Penny Dreadful. The drama is a gothic mashup of Dracula, Dorian Gray, Frankenstein, steampunk aesthetics, vampires, werewolves, diabolical possession and obsolete alienist psychiatry. When I reviewed the first episode in 2014, I found it as impossible to take seriously as Ronan Keating in leather strides, notwithstanding all the impressive acting talent on show, including Rory Kinnear, Simon Russell-Beale, Helen McCrory, Billie Piper and Green herself. But the Victorian-set drama, whose third series starts this week, has since garnered decent ratings and won awards, so what do I know?

One day, Green whispers to me confidingly in husky, French-tinged, but nearly over-articulated English, she was in her trailer in Ireland. She was getting ready to film a scene in which Ives becomes demonically possessed and speaks in voices. In preparation, she was listening to a recording of the voice of a young German woman called Annaliese Michel. You can hear Michel’s ostensibly demonically possessed voice on YouTube, before she underwent Catholic exorcism rites in 1974. It is disturbing listening, and made all the more so thanks to hindsight: Michel died the following year, after which her parents and two priests were convicted of negligent homicide. “As I was listening to it,” says Green, “my makeup artist came in, heard these noises and said: ‘Oh my God, I’m getting out.’ And she ran off. I can understand why. It feels as if it’s contagious.”

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G   /   May 06, 2016   /   1 Comment

by Roslyn Sulcas

 

As Vanessa Ives in the Showtime series “Penny Dreadful,” the French actress Eva Green has been possessed by demons, spoken in tongues, fallen in love with a werewolf and defied the Devil. What on earth can happen to her character next? Something scarier: therapy.

Yes, in Season 3, now underway, the impenetrable Miss Ives visits a “mentalist,” who bears a strange resemblance to a character from Season 2. “I always think, no, it can’t get darker,” said Ms. Green, who was nominated for a Golden Globe for the role. “But, well, you don’t know with this character whether it’s all in her head.”

The show, set in Victorian England, incorporates characters from classic British novels of the era — Dr. Frankenstein and his monsters, Dorian Gray and Dracula — to creepy, head-spinning ends. “I love playing a character from those repressed times who is so nonconformist, it’s very jubilating,” Ms. Green said. “Being possessed, sometimes, it’s very freeing.”

Ms. Green, 35, grew up in Paris and worked in theater before making her screen debut in 2003 in Bernardo Bertolucci’s “The Dreamers,” later appearing as the double agent Vesper Lynd in the 2006 James Bond movie, “Casino Royale.” Later this year, she will appear in Tim Burton’s “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children.”

In an interview at a hotel in London, Ms. Green, dressed all in black, was warm and, unlike Vanessa, smiled a lot. These are edited excerpts from the conversation.

When you were cast as Vanessa, did you know you’d have epic sequences of demonic possession — projectile vomiting and mowing down men and furniture?

I love all that! I prefer doing it to light stuff. There is something very physical about it, which is fun. But it’s true that it’s really intense, like a drug, or a sport. Sometimes, after shooting, I go home and lie on the sofa with a glass of red wine and can’t move.

Is it hard to speak in tongues in that scarily deep voice?

The first season, I was very serious about it. I learned some Latin, Arabic, German and Lingala, a Congolese dialect. But then some linguists created the Verbis Diablo for Season 2. I was very good for an episode. Then I just made it all up and took my voice down an octave or two.

French is your first language, but you’ve mostly worked in English.

I have only done one movie in French, and it was terrible. I’d love to do another, but I’m scared. Playing in another language means you get out of yourself somehow. I worked really crazily to sound British when I did the Bond movie, but I’m a nerd like that.

When did you decide you wanted to act?

I was very shy — I still am actually — and my school forced me to do a theater class when I was 12 because they thought it would be good for me. My mother was an actress, but she stopped when she had children, and she would always tell me it was a cruel business. I went to drama school but thought I wanted to become a director. Then I started to act and really felt alive. And here I am.

What are some of your career goals?

I would love to do something with Jacques Audiard [“Rust and Bone”]. I once wrote him a letter, but perhaps he doesn’t think I’m right. People often see me as sophisticated, or put me in the supernatural box.

What was it like to work with Tim Burton on “Miss Peregrine”?

He was really lovely. The film is about lots of strange children with unique characteristics, and I’m the guardian who protects them from the outside world. There is some darkness, but it’s very fanciful, crazy, with funny moments. It’s very poetic, very Tim.

What’s in store for Vanessa in Season 3?

Vanessa has lost her faith, but deep down there is a longing. She meets Dr. Sweet [a zoologist] in the first episode, and she will fall in love, but it’s weird. It’s a “Penny Dreadful” kind of relationship, what can I say?

 

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G   /   May 03, 2016   /   1 Comment

by Ed Gross

 

There’s always been something betwitching about Eva Green, and that quality is on full display in Penny Dreadful, the John Logan created series that has just begun its third season.

The show, set in Victorian England, brings together many of the characters from classic Gothic literature – among them Dr. Frankenstein, Dorian Gray and, this season, Dr. Henry Jekyll – in an ever-growing canvas of storytelling. Green portrays Vanessa Ives, officially described as “poised, mysterious and utterly composed.” Vanessa is “a seductive and formidable beauty full of secrets and danger. She is keenly observant – clairvoyant even – as well as an expert medium. Her supernatural gifts are powerful and useful to those around her, but they are also a heavy burden. Her inner demons just may be more real than emotional, and they threaten to dextroy her relationships, her sanity and her very life.”

The actress’ credits have included such films as Ridley Scott’s Kingdom Of Heaven, the James Bond film Casino Royale, The Golden Compass, Tim Burton’s Dark Shadows, 300: Rise of An Empire and the forthcoming Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children. She had previously been drawn to television and the role of Morgan in the short-lived Camelot.

Empire conducted this exclusive interview with Green shortly before the premiere of the new season of Penny Dreadful.

 

Given a career made up so largely of film, what was it about Penny Dreadful that made you willing to commit to it?

The role is so meaty. It’s quite rare to find something so rich. John Logan really insisted and insisted and at first I was, like, “Oh my God, I can’t commit to TV. I don’t know if I can.” But then he really kind of talked me through the several seasons and the arc of the character is absolutely beautiful, so I couldn’t say no. So many things to explore as an actor; it’s a gift.

You mentioned the arc. How would you describe Vanessa’s evolution over the course of what we’ve seen so far?

Sometimes she goes back and forth. At the end of season two, she loses her faith, and faith was absolutely everything to her, so she’s most of the time in the darkness, but is somebody that aims towards the light. There’s a lot of turmoil… she’s someone who becomes almost like a Joan of Arc, but there is something very pure about her.

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G   /   October 30, 2015   /   1 Comment

By Tara MacInnis

Woman of mystery Eva Green, who stars in a major hair campaign for L’Oréal, shares her secrets

With her inky cascading over pale shoulders, Eva Green—famous for her role as James Bond’s one true love Vesper Lynd in Casino Royale—is becoming the go-to leading lady for all things brooding. Early next year, she’ll play the title character in macabre master Tim Burton’s Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children; next May she returns as the demon-tormented Vanessa Ives in Penny Dreadful’s third season. And now, L’Oréal Professionnel has tapped the French actress as its spokesperson for a new intensive hair treatment range. “It’s a revolution,” she says, wearing a long black dress, obsidian nail polish and smudgy kohl eyeshadow during the launch at the Le Meurice hotel in Paris. “It takes your hair from f-cked up to beautiful, strong, healthy.” The taxidermy-collecting star fits into Burton’s quirky world quite honestly. Unafraid of ghosts and ghouls, here’s what really causes her fright: “Not being loved…being rejected,” she says, revealing a tender truth beneath the dark facade.

Green’s Gothic Beauty Tips
Go Deep: “As a teenager, I was dark blonde. I was going through a shy phase, and I wanted to change something. My mum’s friend had black hair, and I decided to try it. I feel now that it’s more me.”
Do Blood Red: “I love M.A.C Lady Danger lipstick for all occasions. The matte finish lasts for hours.”
Shun the Sun: “I never go out without an SPF of at least 30. It’s the key to dodging aging.”

Resurrect damaged hair with the latest regenerating treatment
After 15 years of research, L’Oréal Professionnel has finally solved the beauty world’s mane dilemma: how to make a pricey reparative salon treatment last beyond your next wash. Pro Fiber’s molecular mix, dubbed APTYL 100, rebuilds frayed strands and then seals itself inside hair with a protective film. After your initial spa-style pampering using one of three hair-care systems (Revive, Restore or Reconstruct), a for-pros-only dose of the juiced-up activator locks in smoothness for up to four washes. An at-home five-piece range includes a booster that recharges results for another four-wash cycle, with lustre that lasts six weeks—until your next appointment.

 

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G   /   July 22, 2015   /   1 Comment

Eva comes at #2 at 8:53 mark.

G   /   May 30, 2015   /   0 Comments

Gallery link:
– Magazines & Newspapers > 2015 > Máxima (Portugal) – May 2015

Green Energy

Some consider her the femme fatale of the 21st Century. Others see her as the selective actress of The Dreamers by Bertolucci. In Paris, in the event of L’Oréal Professionnel for its new spokesperson, Máxima confirmed Eva Green’s magnetism:

Known as one of the femme fatale of her generation, Eva Green never had any difficulty in accepting challenging roles. The careful selection of roles leaves no doubt about her cinematograph preferences but this French is much more than a character in a film noir. It doesn’t surprise considering her ancestry. Daughter of Marlène Jobert and a Swedish dentist, followed her mother’s footsteps, she studied in Eva Saint Paul Drama School. But it was her brilliant performance in The Dreamers, by Bernardo Bertolluci, the turning point where she decided to make a career in the movies. Two years later she arrived in Hollywood and in a few months she already got the leading role in the Ridley Scott film Kingdom of Heaven. Her cinematography is not vast, shooting a few more than one film a year, between 2003 and 2014, most are independent movies. It would be strange for her role as a Bond Girl in Casino Royale if Vesper Lynd wasn’t one of the most complex characters in the saga. And sensual. Despite this sensuality in the screen, Eva calls herself a nerd, admitting that she rather have a glass of wine and a good book than go to a party.

She is not an interview fan but she welcomed Máxima with an unexpected sympathy considering she is at the end of a marathon of them. She threatened to lie on the velvet couch while she invited me to sit with a theatrical gesture but she didn’t do it. The expressivity of the actress doesn’t seem to have the right to rest even after hours of answering journalists. She admits that starting a career working with directors like Bertolucci gave her confidence to choose roles. And despite telling us that she would like to play simpler characters, her last choice seems to indicate that she not ready yet to move away from demanding roles. She is filming Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Tim Burton, a fantastic horror story based in a New York Times best-seller book. Before saying goodbye she told us that she would love to visit our country ( Portugal) : “Even with my skin tone. I really like the sun”. And even with heels she says she loves what she does and “when we are in love with what we do, that’s not really a job’’

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G   /   April 20, 2015   /   0 Comments

By Patricia Dahaner

 

For a former ‘Bond’ girl, Eva Green certainly knows how to keep under the radar. After two years of living quietly in Ireland, she says that she’s happier walking the Wicklow hills – make-up free – than in a Dublin nightclub

Eva Green has been doing so much work in Ireland in recent years that the Paris-born actress jokes that she should get herself an Irish passport.

Living in Dalkey, Co. Dublin, for the past two years, she is very at home in a house by the sea, to which she retreats each night, after days at Ardmore Studios filming Penny Dreadful.

A self-described introvert – who says she took up acting to help with her acute shyness – the embrace of the coastline of Dublin Bay comforts her.

“There’s something very magical and very spiritual in Ireland. The nature is very particular here and there are forces,” she tells me in her very quiet voice. It’s a statement befitting of Vanessa Ives, the mysterious clairvoyant that Eva plays in supernatural TV series Penny Dreadful.

Though set in Victorian London, the show – which also stars Timothy Dalton and Josh Hartnett and is now in its second series for American network Showtime – is filmed in Dublin. When we meet on the set at Ardmore Studios, 34-year-old Eva is dressed in a purple silk shirt and black tie from Dolce & Gabbana over a pair of black leather trousers and high boots. She’s friendly and wants to give a decent interview, but there’s also an arms-length reserve which she can’t help but give off. There’s almost no trace of a French accent when she speaks.

“I shot Cracks here in Ireland, it’s a small film. A long time ago, I did a TV show here also, called Camelot. I’ve spent two years here now doing Penny Dreadful, so I think I should get an Irish passport!

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G   /   March 11, 2015   /   0 Comments

There are few experiences in modern cinema quite as intoxicating as watching Eva Green behaving badly. Whether she’s an American housewife on the verge of a nervous breakdown in White Bird in a Blizzard, or fixing those deep turquoise eyes on her oppressors in the revenge western The Salvation, or wrestling demons in the TV series Penny Dreadful, it’s impossible to tear your gaze away.

Green is an enigma, hiding in plain sight. She’s a femme fatale with as many female admirers as male ones, a Bond girl who all but ate Bond for breakfast. Her beauty is of the troubling sort that drives prim conformists mad – they’re forever wanting her to fix her teeth, go easy on the eye make-up, tone down the witchiness and look like everyone else.

Read the full article here on telegraph.co.uk.

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