Archive for the ‘Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children’ Category
G   /   March 29, 2019   /   0 Comments

G   /   March 28, 2019   /   0 Comments

by Adolfo López
 
 
In order to enter the world of Dumbo, Eva Green not only had to transform herself into Colette Marchant, a French trapeze artist, better known in Dreamland as the Queen of the Heavens, to earn this title, the actress had to train for five months to become an aerial artist, despite her fear of heights.

“I had absolute terror, it was a real phobia, and I said at the beginning to Tim Burton – director of the film -: ‘I do not know if I can do my stunts’. But I trained with Katharine Arnold, who is an amazing aerial artist, and the choreographer Fran Jaynes, and they really helped me gain confidence and find the physical part of the character. ”

“It’s incredible to swing so high, spin around and do a strange choreography. It was a real challenge, and I am very proud of myself for that”, the actress explains in an interview facilitated by Disney to El Sol de México.

Like many, Eva Green grew up with the animated story of Dumbo, released in 1941 and awarded six years later at the Cannes Film Festival for its animation design. “I loved the story; the relationship between the baby elephant and the mother really marked me as a child. It is a very powerful and universal story, with which both children and adults can connect”, she recalls.

However, consider that the “Tim Burton version has a new and different point of view. He is a director who always brings many surprises, magic, humor and emotion. It’s still very moving. It’s such a powerful story, and I think the baby elephant will melt the hearts of everyone”, she says.

Eva Green is a recurring actress in the last productions of Tim Burton, because she has participated in the Dark Shadows film and as protagonist in Miss Peregrine’s Home of Peculiar Children. “He is an iconic director, a poet, who always brings a unique vision, and is perfect for this film, because nobody understands people who do not fit better than him. He understands vulnerable souls like Dumbo”, she explains about the filmmaker’s work in this film where Michael Keaton and Danny DeVito also participates.

That’s why Dumbo seems like a perfect movie to be told by the twice-Oscar-nominated director. “This is a very characteristic film by Tim Burton: it encourages you to accept your uniqueness, your individuality. You must not be perfect to be loved. And it also tells children that they must believe in themselves. If you believe in yourself, you can overcome any obstacle. It’s a very important message from Disney!”, she stresses.

In this film, the Golden Globe nominee for the Penny Dreadful series, paired with Michael Keaton, who plays Vandevere, the owner of Dreamland , the circus where Dumbo grows. “Michael is crazy in an adorable way. He is very charismatic and irreverent. I had to pinch myself. I thought: ‘My God, it’s Beetlejuice . Wow!’. It was hard for me not to distract myself and continue with my character”, she says.

But she also shared credits with Golden Globe winner and Oscar nominee Danny DeVito: “It’s a pleasure to work with him. He is so free. He is always having fun. It is a great inspiration. I’m very impressed with him. I wish I could be on the set every day because he exudes a lot of positive energy.”
 
 
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Stef   /   July 08, 2018   /   0 Comments

Blu-ray screencaps, including extras, of Eva in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children have been added to the gallery. Enjoy the new additions!


G   /   June 21, 2017   /   2 Comments

 
Eva and Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children got Teen Choice Awards nominations and it’s up to you to make them win!

For fans who reside in the 50 US states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, VOTE HERE.

For fans who lives outside the mentioned territories, you can cast your vote on Twitter by tweeting the following as much as you can until August 13:

My #ChoiceFantasyMovieActress is #EvaGreen!

My #ChoiceFantasyMovie is @PeregrinesMovie!

The 2017 Teen Choice Awards two hour LIVE event will air Sunday, Aug. 13 (8:00-10:00 PM ET live/PT tape-delayed), on FOX.

G   /   November 26, 2016   /   2 Comments

We’ve added some new scans from the past few months to the gallery. Enjoy!
 



 
GALLERY LINKS:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Stylist Magazine – November 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > GQ (France) — October 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Grazia (Mexico) – October 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Version Femina (France) – September 26-October 2, 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > The Edit – September 8-15, 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Starpics – September 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > La Cosa Cine (Argentina) – September 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > ELLE (France) – September 30, 2016
 
Thank you to Flo for the La Cosa Cine magazine scans! To contribute or share your personal scans to help enrich our gallery, contact us HERE.

G   /   November 18, 2016   /   6 Comments

By MiNDFOOD
 
 
The elusive Eva takes time to talk to MiNDFOOD about her love of music, what she lives for and where she goes to escape.

Currently starring in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the fabulously glamorous and offbeat Eva Green, 36 (article corrected to Eva’s correct current age as of publication; original article contained the incorrect age of “38”), talks to MiNDFOOD about myriad subjects – from whether she’s ‘hot’ enough for Hollywood to her childhood fear of clowns. A former Bond Girl (Casino Royale) and regular on the TV show, Penny Dreadful, was born in Paris. She exudes an old-fashioned mysterious quality rarely seen in modern actresses, that same quality has guaranteed her a career in film.
 
Miss Peregrine is described as mysterious, smart and tough. Some might would say this was a perfect fit.
(laughs) Well, I like to think so. I try.

What do you like about this beloved literary character?
She’s so cool. She looks after all these gorgeous children and smokes the pipe (laughs). And also, it’s the first time I am not playing the love interest.

Do you smoke?
Not anymore. I used to be a smoker but I stopped 3 years ago.

Thinking about the word peculiar – when have you felt peculiar in your life?
I always felt a bit peculiar. I think lots of people have felt at some point quite different. People say I’m weird but I don’t feel weird – so maybe I am weird! (laughs). I have black hair, I felt strange as a child, I was very shy, scared of going to birthday parties and clowns.

What scares you now?
Oh, God, lots of things in this world. I don’t know where to start. Greed, pollution. Greed mostly.

Do you have any pets?
I have a dog but my sister looks after him. He’s a Border Terrier. His name is Mr. Griffin.

How do you get along with your sister?
My sister lives in Italy so I don’t see her very often but we Skype. She has two beautiful children that I adore. She has a vineyard so she makes her own wine. Yeah, it’s very cool.

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G   /   October 11, 2016   /   0 Comments

G   /   October 10, 2016   /   3 Comments

By Neala Johnson
 
 
“It’s nice,” says Eva Green, “not to play the girlfriend.”

“I don’t want to be the woman in the script where it goes, ‘There’s a beautiful, mysterious woman …’ Just, OK, forget it. I think I would feel unhappy … Some people play it very well but I want to be as equal as a man, you know what I mean?”

Oh, we know what she means.

As far as mysterious girlfriends go, Green played a stunner — to Daniel Craig’s James Bond in his first, bracing outing, Casino Royale.

So impactful was Green’s Vesper Lynd, Bond basically spent the next three films getting over her.

But now the London-based Frenchwoman is over it too. Searching for the word to perfectly capture what she wants to do from here on in, Green finally settles upon “other”.

“It’s exciting to be other.”

If it’s other she wants, Green could wish for no better co-conspirator than Tim Burton.

She teams with the famously eccentric director for a second time on Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, a fantastical adaptation of Ransom Riggs’ best-selling young-adult novel.

Green plays Miss Peregrine, a woman who, while protecting a gaggle of children with unusual abilities from outside threats, also has a peculiarity of her own: as the name suggests, she can transform into a bird.

“I remember Tim called me a year before the shoot. He was like, ‘I’ve got this book, I wonder if you would be interested?’ I was like, ‘Anything, I’d play anything for you’. But he was like, ‘No, no, I want you to read it and see if you like her’.”

A woman-bird who’s handy with a crossbow, has absolutely no love interest and is slightly bonkers? It’s safe to say Green liked her.

“Tim called her Scary Poppins, which I thought was quite funny,” the 36-year-old laughs. “But she’s not a bad, mad woman — it’s all to save her children. She has the ability to transform into a peregrine falcon and because peregrine falcons are the fastest animal on earth, she delivers lines very quickly.

“I watched some documentaries on birds. It was kind of a challenge — I was trying to have little, sharp movements with my head and not much blinking at all, using my hands like claws, my long nails. You always worry that you’re going a bit over the top, but I had a lot of fun … playing her like Mary Poppins on speed.”

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G   /   October 06, 2016   /   1 Comment

By Danny Leigh
 
 
The cast of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children have a tale or two
 
Eva Green: “I was terrified of being the centre of attention”
I’ve always felt a little peculiar. Growing up in Paris I was always quiet. Very shy. I was scared of going to birthday parties, because I couldn’t play games and I didn’t like being in a group. I have a twin sister, and she had that bravery, she could join in with the group. But for me, it was painful.

On my sixth birthday, another girl and I had a shared party, and I was so nervous I vomited. I know how crazy it is – from that terror of being the centre of attention, here I am as an actress. My parents made some home movies when I was three or four and I was already in my own bubble, looking away from the camera, thinking my own thoughts. Now I’ve tamed my demons but if I have to appear as myself in public, it’s hard. Deep down the child is still there.

As a girl, I used to go to the cinema on my own. I hate it when people say the cinema is an escape, as if making small talk about the weather is more real. I loved the films of Ingmar Bergman and also A Room with a View. I saw it first when I was about eight, and I loved it immediately.

At 16, I studied for a year at the American School of Paris, and that was a revelation. The French school system is very judgemental. There, everything was about the pressure to get a certain grade in Maths. Who cares? I don’t remember a thing I did in Maths. But at the American School, the individual was celebrated. I’d never been into fashion, but I would dress up every day, wilder and wilder. I did art, drama, photography, even sports. It was an epiphany for me.

If enough people call you weird, you start to see yourself as weird. But in adult life, it can be a strength, too. And sometimes I do still feel like I belong to a different planet, where all the peculiars should go.

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G   /   October 06, 2016   /   0 Comments

By Naomi Pike
 
 
Eva Green might be a Bond girl, a Hollywood leading lady and a BAFTA winner, but she’ll never forget her first time gracing the cover of Vogue. Green’s debut was almost eight years ago, but she can recall the shoot with Patrick Demarchelier as though it was yesterday.

“He is such a wonderful photographer and it’s effortless as well. It’s timeless and sophisticated and I always love his use of lighting. He’s an artist that doesn’t have an ego. There is a relationship with him – it’s not that I’m an object.” The rapport that the pair share is visible in the black and white images that the shoot produced. She’s laughing and pulling faces, but strikes a glamorous pose in Prada on the cover.

While she might be happy to reminisce over her time shooting for Vogue, one thing she confesses she is “not great” is watching her own films. When we meet she is yet to see Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children, in which she takes the titular role.

Another part of the acting rigmorale that Green prefers to steer away from – and is now in a position to have the option to avoid – is auditioning. “I’m always blessed when I’m not auditioning. I hate auditions. I’m rubbish, actually, and I get so nervous. My heart is about to pop out. It’s a disaster.”

Green is not a person you think of having a nervous disposition. On the red carpet she chooses bold yet ephemeral styles – something that could be linked to the characters she has chosen to play in her over 15 years on screen.

“It’s funny really as I don’t really have time to try on clothes,” she remarks as the conversation turns to the “baroque” aesthetic that she has become synonymous with. For the premiere of the film which marks the second time she has worked with Tim Burton, Green chose a scarlet Elie Saab gown.

However, securing her first choice was a bit more problematic. “I would have loved to wear an original Alexander McQueen dress, because he loved birds,” she reveals. As the name might suggest, her character Miss Peregrine is able to transform into a peregrine falcon, so a feathered gown would have felt particularly apt. “But it’s all in museums,” she sadly confesses.

Green first made a name for herself in Bernardo Bertolucci’s 2003 film The Dreamers, and the now 36-year-old admits that the pressures of being an actress in Hollywood have altered for her. Now it is age as well as “fighting to not play a love interest.”

Green has kept her personal life out of the public eye. Unlike many of her peers, her social-media presence is minimal. Her friends keep trying to persuade her to join Instagram but she fears the intrusion. “I prefer having my own bubble and I would feel too vulnerable to have it exposed. I think I’ve always protected myself quite well but it’s always been tough since day one. That’s the big challenge, and at the same time to remain vulnerable as an actor. Sometimes I just want to say ‘fuck it, I’m going to in the mountains with my animals’ and not to have to deal with all that cruelty.”

They say you should never work with children or animals, but with the majority of the roles in Miss Peregrine being played by those not yet able to even hold a UK driving licence, she was left with little choice. Not that her experience was anything but pleasant. “Sometimes you worry are they going to be focused enough? Are they going to get tired? And actually absolutely all of them were focused, very professional. They were just beautiful. I was so nervous before meeting them because you can feel that they can see through you, and you’re not going to be credible as a strong headmistress-like figure. But there is a grace to children and as an actress that is wonderful to watch. It’s a real inspiration.”

The book that which this film is based on was released for the YA audience 2011, but feels completely at home in the world of Tim Burton. The characters as atypical as the ones most associated with him: Edward Scissorhands, Jack Skellington, the Maitlands.

Much like her feelings for Demarchelier, Green has great affection for Burton. Ahead of this film, the two had previously worked together on 2012’s Dark Shadows.

“He is so easy to work with,” she says warmly. “The wonderful thing about Tim is that he has no ego. He is very kind, normal and fragile. There is something equal with him that I love. Even working with the children he was like ‘What do you think? How do you feel?’ which is so nice. He’s so open to ideas as well. He’s wonderful and amazing.”

As it to be expected in any Burton epic, the visual is as much of a defining characteristic as is the plotline itself. Green’s character is all dark colours, nipped-in waists and striking shoulders. Her signature midnight black hair, which so seduced the camera in Casino Royale, is pinned with a cowlick curl. While her locks might be more on the navy side for this character, in reality Green’s hair is surprisingly little more dramatic than a “mousey” shade, reflecting her Swedish-French roots.

“My dark blonde was actually quite bland,” she confesses, admitting that she has darkened it to have “something happening” since she was a teen. “A friend of my mum had very dark hair. She was from Yugoslavia and I wanted to look like her.”

Besides wanting to look like her mum’s friend, a darker shade did feel more natural for the young actress. But, much like she won’t be defined by the characters she plays, the decision was not as simple as “I am dark, so I should have dark hair”, or a case for wanting to be more easily recognisable. Green admits to possessing the ability to make herself invisible as she walks through London in swathes of scarves and glasses. Unfortunately, with her CV continuing to expand and a beauty as powerful as hers, her anonymity is becoming scarcer and scarcer.
 
 
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G   /   October 06, 2016   /   1 Comment

G   /   October 05, 2016   /   0 Comments

G   /   October 04, 2016   /   2 Comments

G   /   October 04, 2016   /   1 Comment

By Stephen Schaefer
 
 
‘Peculiar’ Powers
 
As the protective mistress of a troupe of World War II orphans, Eva Green vividly creates a woman with extraordinary powers in Tim Burton’s “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children” (now in theaters).

In 1943, with Nazi Germany bombing Britain, Green’s Miss Peregrine fiercely guards her young charges — each of whom has a distinctive “peculiarity,” like the ability to freeze objects, float up into the sky or ignite fires.

Their mistress has a power of her own: the ability to transform into a peregrine falcon.

For Green, 36, that meant screening a 1965 film classic and meeting a falcon.

“The indication Tim gave me was, ‘She’s like a weird Mary Poppins.’ So I watched ‘Mary Poppins.’ It’s more than she can fly. It’s more the physicality because of her bird-like quality.

“A peregrine falcon is a bird of prey. It’s the fastest animal on the planet, so doing a Tim Burton movie, you have to bring an edge to it. You move your head quite sharply. You can’t blink. I had to deliver the lines very fast, sort of like Mary Poppins on speed. That was fun!”

As for that falcon, “It was quite regal, actually. There’s something quite acute and fascinating. They remain quite still, and in a second, grab the prey — and that’s it.

“That’s why Tim calls her ‘Scary Poppins’ — because she’s a bird of prey; she can kill to protect her children. But she has that maternal quality as well.”

Did Green, who just ended her “Penny Dreadful” series on Showtime, get in touch with her inner bird?

“God! It’s true,” she said, laughing. “It’s not too easy playing a bird. It’s all very angular, precise. On my own, I tried to be a bit sharp. It’s just a feeling — you worry: ‘I might have gone too far, done too much.’ But Tim’s there, and he would say, ‘less,’ ‘more.’ ”

As this film is Green’s second collaboration with Burton, following 2012’s “Dark Shadows,” some critics have anointed her as the legendary filmmaker’s muse.

“I don’t know. Muse is such a big word. It’s quite intimidating, a big responsibility. I’m just flattered he asked me to be part of this adventure.”
 
 
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G   /   October 04, 2016   /   2 Comments