Archive for the ‘Movies’ Category
G   /   October 25, 2014   /   3 Comments

Eva Green

Her magnetic allure is the key to her inscrutable sensuality. She’s gorgeous, fragile, and utterly irresistible


You needed a really special woman to irremediably break James Bond’s heart: an inscrutable woman able to convey contrasting sentiments such as fragility, determination, fear, sensuality, desperation and mystery with just a glance. That would be Eva Green, the actress who played Vesper Lynd, the great love of Daniel Craig’s 007. Hers is not a stage name, but she followed in the footsteps of her mother, the French actress Marlène  Jobert. “In the beginning, my mother kept telling me not to choose this career because it is a cruel world and I’m very fragile. Perhaps I was also afraid of being compared to her, not only in terms of a mother-daughter relationship, but also on a professional level.” When you meet Eva for the first time, you are struck by her beauty and by her magnetic allure, those slightly guarded smoky eyes, dusky voice, and disarming shyness. “I know I’m vulnerable, extremely shy and insecure. I feel I can only truly express myself when I’m acting.”

Discovered by Bernardo Bertolucci, who launched her in the film The Dreamers in 2003, Eva became internationally famous with Casino Royale. It was, in a certain sense, an opportunity that turned out to be a mixed blessing. It made her one of the most famous and unforgettable Bond girls, but it also transformed her, despite herself, into the femme fatale archetype that every director wants. That is why she is twice as happy today to be the heroine of the action fantasy flick 300 – Rise of an Empire. In it, she is Artemisia, the warrior queen thirsting for revenge. It is a very virile and physical role. “I like having to handle a sword and fight like a man. What girl wouldn’t be happy to be a man for at least one day?” But that was just an interlude because Eva has gone back to being the dark, sensual, and enigmatic actress that we were accustomed to seeing on the screen. Whether it is on TV, with the series Penny Dreadful where she is Vanessa Ives, an unsettling girl from a good family possessed by evil spirits in Victorian London, or in the movies as Ava Lord, “the dame to kill for” in the next Sin City, Eva is quite the irresistible femme fatale.


Source: Vogue Italia

By Maria Grazia Meda, excerpt from Vogue Italia, September 2014, n. 769, p.348  Published: 09/15/2014 – 07:00



G   /   October 18, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Dennis Dermody

White Bird In A Blizzard
Gregg Araki’s latest is a moody, melancholic, spellbinding movie based on the novel by Laura Kasischke. Set in 1988, teenage Kat (Shailene Woodley) is dealing with her mother’s (Eva Green) mysterious disappearance one day. Time passes with no word from her and she gets by living with her sadsack dad (Chris Meloni), hanging with her friends (Gabourey Sidibe & Mark Indelicato), seeing a shrink (Angela Bassett), sometimes screwing her dim but criminally cute neighbor (Shiloh Fernandez) and hooking up with the hot investigating detective (Thomas Jane). But she is haunted by dreams of her mother. Eva Green (seen in flashbacks straining furiously to break the bonds of her oppressive married live) is frighteningly good. Araki’s spot-on use of period music and dreamy cinematography give the film a haunting Mysterious Skin-like vibe, which serves it wonderfully.

Read the rest of the list HERE.

Source: Paper Magazine

G   /   October 17, 2014   /   3 Comments

Gregg Araki talks about White Bird in a Blizzard and working with Eva Green (at 6:30 mark).

G   /   October 14, 2014   /   2 Comments

By Fred Topel

Director Greg Araki discusses the psychology of his female characters and looks back on ‘The Doom Generation’ and Sundance in the 1990s.


Would a woman like Eve be diagnosed today as depressed?  

I do think that she’s definitely depressed. 

Maybe even bipolar.

Yes, possibly bipolar. I just saw her character as being a very tragic figure in the sense that if you think about when she grew up, she grew up in the ‘50s and ‘60s. Her role models were Jackie O, etc. Eva Green and I talked about these old school Hitchcock movie star heroines that were always these glamorous, like the perfect wife, the perfect mother. Shai’s character talks about it a little bit in the film. That was her only option. She didn’t have an option of become a doctor, travel the world or do this. It was just you’re going to get married and have kids. He character itself to me was very tragic in the sense that she had no choices in life and so found herself in this existence that was for her, soul crushing.

How did you approach photographing Eva Green as the ‘80s homemaker?

She’s just the most amazing actress in the world. Eva was only 32 when we made this movie. In the film, there’s young Eve and there’s older Eve, so when we were casting, it was like we could cast an older actress and try to make her look younger for her younger scenes. Or we could cast a younger actress and try to make her look older. When you see Eva, when she’s young, the scene in the restaurant where she’s like this glamorous kind of movie star character, when she’s getting married and she’s like this radiant bride, that’s what Eva Green looks like. When she would show up on set, we did minimal makeup on her. No prosthetics, nothing. It was literally just all of her acting. She just showed up and she was this withered, sad, kind of tragic figure. She’s just amazing.

Read the rest of Gregg Araki’s interview HERE.

Source: CraveOnline

G   /   October 12, 2014   /   1 Comment

Here are some more reviews on Eva’s performance in White Bird in a Blizzard. Click on the Source links for the full film review.

Green most certainly enjoys playing the more over-the-top roles, and this is another one to add to the collection. She’s absolutely engrossing on screen, as we just can’t keep our eyes off of her crazy antics throughout the course of the flashbacks.

– Jeff Nelson for DVDTalk, White Bird in a Blizzard 

Also stellar here is, unsurprisingly, Eva Green, Hollywood’s boldest actress and White Bird in a Blizzard’s enigmatic conflict-catalyst, a troubled woman lashing out against domestication while losing her mind.

– Matt Barone for Complex, Permanent Midnight: Shailene Woodley, Eva Green, and More ‘Week Two’ Fantasia Film Festival Highlights 

Green plays up the hysteria in Eve’s voice and performs in a scene-chewing manner that leads up perfectly to a character meltdown.

– Allyson Johnson for The Young Folks, Ally’s Movie Review: White Bird in a Blizzard

The flashbacks are explosive bouts of emotion, with Eva Green snarling and spitting venom as only Eva Green can….and the melodramatic showcase for Eva Green as a housewife spiraling out of her mind in a loveless marriage and joyless life is filled with fireworks you cannot take your eyes off of.

– Mike Shutt for Rope of Silicon, ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’ (2014) Movie Review

Stef   /   October 11, 2014   /   1 Comment

Blu-ray screencaps of Eva in 300: Rise of an Empire have been added to the gallery. Enjoy the new additions!

Gallery link:
Blu-ray Screencaptures

G   /   October 08, 2014   /   4 Comments

By Hillary Weston

“I’m very shy and awkward, so playing all these characters and taking on these different roles from myself makes me feel alive and gives me blood,” Eva Green tells me when I ask about the mysterious and darkly seductive roles she’s known for in contrast to the person she is off-screen. “I’m breathing and alive when I’m acting, and I’m confident when I’m acting—I’m not always in real life.” But for the alluring French actress, her intense sensuality and cunning intellect have made her one of Hollywood’s most sought after women, from her breakout role in Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Dreamers and her turn as a bond girl in Casino Royale to starring on Showtime’s Penny Dreadful and her latest role in Gregg Araki’s White Bird in a Blizzard.

Starring Green alongside Shailene Woodley, Araki’s film (King of Teenage Doom) takes us back to the late 1980‘s to tell his dark suburban dream, based on Laura Kasischke’s novel of the same title. In White Bird, we follow Kat (Woodley), a 17-year-old girl whose emotionally unstable mother, Eve (Green), vanishes mysteriously one afternoon. Caught up in her newfound sexuality and exploration of desire and emotion, Kat represses the confusion and anger of her mother’s haunting disappearance, as her father (played by Christopher Meloni) continues on with his life in the shadow of Eve’s absence.But as the story unravels, we’re given insight into Eve’s life, with surreal flashbacks and snow-covered dreams, revealing the natural of Kat’s uneasy relationship with her mother and how deeply miserable Eve was in her caged-in life as a homemaker.

And although she is but a mere decade older than Woodley in real life, Green manages to elevate her Mommie Dearest-esque character to someone untethered by time, a ghost haunting their lives. Wonderfully theatrical while not going entirely over the top, Green plays up the ugliness of Eve’s alcoholism and anger to age herself, adding a sense of hyper-melodrama akin to one of Fassbinder’s women on the verge. So with White Bird in a Blizzard now out on VOD and in theaters next week, I stole some time with Green to chat about her fears about playing Shailene’s mother, her ability to make herself invisible, and acting inside a dream.

As a new actor to the world of Gregg Araki, how did you become involved in the film?

I remember I was in Bulgaria doing the 300film and my agent was like, “My god, you need to look at this I’m sure you’re going to love this.” And then I just really loved the story, and it was so unusual and frustrated and it had such a great conflict with the daughter. I was very moved by it, so I said yes straight away!

Had you been a fan of his past films?

Yeah, I remember I saw Mysterious Skin in the cinema when it came it. It was dreamlike and very tormented. There’s something in his films that are a bit David Lynch in a way. Seeing the film in the cinema I remember it was like a dream and fucked up and I loved that very much. His other films are all teenage trashy bonkers funny and this one, White Bird, I find more grown up. It’s in another category of its own.

How was the experience of turning in this character and playing a woman who was written significantly older than you? Did you read the book to get of the feeling of who she was?

When I found out my daughter would be played by Shailene, I was like, oh my god! It’s a bit unbelievable; we look more like sisters. But Gregg was like, don’t worry, it’s a bit surreal and you’ll have another hairdo. I was worried that it would not be believable, so I loved her journey. You see her young in her 20s and then it ages me. But I tried to portray that aging more in her character. She’s an alcoholic and her body changes and her voice changes, so it was a challenge.

She only exists in these surreal memories and in flashbacks, so in a way she felt ageless.

Yes, yes.

There’s something about your character that also felt out of time and very rooted in melodrama, like she belonged to films of the past, in opposition the natural cool of the teens.

It’s true. She’s kind of a mixture of a lot of women. She could have been a movie star but she didn’t fulfill her dreams and got trapped like a bird in a cage. Sometimes it felt like, am I going completely over the top, a complete alcoholic kind of thing, but Gregg allowed me to go there because it was a dream. You have all these teenagers and they’re cool and I had the excuse of being in a dream.

You’ve worked with a lot of great directors, but what was the experience like working with Gregg Araki?

In the beginning it was a struggle to find the money for the film and then the actors. But it’s nice that this film was made all with heart, and Gregg is very open and he’s so passionate. He’s like a child on set, with this passion and he’s so loving. He’s really all about who these characters are and the story. It’s all fun. There’s no judgement or games or bullshit. It’s pure joy and we all loved it.

How was Shailene as a co-star and daughter?

I was intimidated at first. I thought, oh god am I going to measure up? Is this going to believable? But Shailene was so great and she calmed me down and made me feel confident. She was very supportive. She’s very wise and very mature, an old soul. And she’s also very aware of the world and extremely bright and amazing.

Looking back on the roles you’ve played, there’s been a lot of characters that fall into the darker, more dramatic realm. Do you tend to gravitate towards these roles or do you find that people approach you for them because that’s how they perceive you as an actor?

You take what you find, but I am always looking for something that’s complex and something that’s interesting. I also don’t want people to put me in a box of one character also. So I always hope people have enough imagination. But I am always drawn to something complicated. It’s jubilating in a strange way, but you also have to be careful. 

Do you find that you’re a much different person off-screen and not the mysterious woman we often see you play?

Oh, yeah. No one ever really recognizes me really. I take the tube all the time and it’s fine. I can make myself invisible, I have that power. I’m also very shy and feel so awkward that playing all these characters and taking on these different roles from myself makes me feel alive and gives me blood. I’m breathing and alive when I’m acting and I’m confident when I’m acting. I’m not always in real life, but I would like to be. So I think I’m very different for sure.

What are you working on now?

I’m going to Ireland to shoot the second season of Penny Dreadful. I get to play a very gifted and fabulous character. It’s an interesting character and one of the most interesting I’ve gotten to play. She’s in the dark but she’s fighting to get to the light and she goes through such an amazing, rich journey. 

Source: BlackBook 


G   /   October 07, 2014   /   1 Comment

Here are some more reviews on Eva’s performance in White Bird in a Blizzard. Click on the Source links for the full film review.

……She’s matched in intensity by Eva Green, who is such a delicious mess as Kat’s mentally unwinding mother that I missed having her on screen. 

– Scott Feinberg for, Sundance Review: White Bird in a Blizzard

As I’ve already harped on, the casting in this movie is brilliant. Just imagine Eva Green as a misanthropic housewife, someone who would be jealous of her daughter’s looks, because she’s getting old. This is a woman whose chest was too hot for a Sin City 2 poster, and that’s precisely why it works so well. Eva Green embodies Eve Connor, the miracle homemaker turned miserable, listless drunk, with a husky voice and a sliver of the possessed version of her Vanessa Ives character in Penny Dreadful, and it’s arguably more terrifying to find her in 1980’s suburbia. Eva Green is as magnetic an actor as there is working today (is there a more interesting one? Envision a movie that costars Green and Adam Driver…), and her absence is felt as much as her overwhelming presence in this one.

– Andy Greene for Popinsomniacs, Film Review: ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’ and Shailene Woodley Subvert Expectations

……current vamp-for-hire Eva Green, meanwhile, is all stylized hauteur, as if playing Joan Crawford under Todd Solondz’s instruction. (She’s pretty great, in other words.)…….Her mother Eve (Green) has no such reticence, posing at every given opportunity in slinky, ridge-shouldered femme fatale dresses and flirting lasciviously with local boys. (She extends a dinner invitation to one, cooing that she makes a mean “crab thermidor” — Green says the words as if offering sex on a popsicle stick. It’s the most delicious moment in the entire film.)

– Guy Lodge for HitFix, Review: Shailene Woodley and Eva Green spark in disappointing ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’

Christopher Meloni and Eva Green do just as strong work as Woodley. Eva Green continues her streak of manic strong women here in the role of Woodley’s mother Eve. Green’s over the top delivery works well here as a protrait of a mother who’s looks are fading as fast as her atrophy for the life she lives is growing inside of her. To see something as deranged as 300: Rise of an Empire and White Bird in a Blizzard and how she is able to gel into both perfectly is a testament to her prowess as a performer. Both films show that Green appears to be just beginning a very interesting and arresting career……The final moments between Meloni and Green are as heartbreaking as one will see this year.

– Adam Kautzer for FilmDispenser, White Bird in a Blizzard – Film Review (2014)

Eva Green took on the role of the disappearing mother, Eve. As always, Green was amazing and managed to make herself feel present on screen even though she was not the lead. Ever since I saw her in The Dreamers I can’t get enough of her!

– Nina Chabel for Montreal Rampage, Review: White Bird ina  Blizzard at Fantasia

G   /   October 04, 2014   /   1 Comment

Here are some more reviews on Eva’s performance in White Bird in a Blizzard. Click on the Source links for the full film review.

French actress Green, an underused talent, has always had something crazed behind her large, popped eyes, a ferocious energy that serves her well here as a woman disappointed by life and content to rage against it until everyone in her wake is as miserable as she is.

– Beth Hanna for Indiewire: Thompson on Hollywood, Sundance Review: ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’

Eva Green goes deliciously unhinged in Gregg Araki’s latest!

– Peter Debruge for Variety, Sundance Film Review: ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’

Because it must be said—Eva Green isn’t exactly the star of ‘White Bird,’ but she gives one hell of a performance. With the small running time she’s in, she doesn’t just chew up the scenery, she devours it whole (including every actor that shares space with her). Her vicious maw is as staggering as her talent threatens to overshadow everyone who dares to come across her path……All in all, “White Bird in a Blizzard” is worth seeing for Eva Green’s performance alone, and to experience the dreamlike quality of Gregg Araki’s individual, highly unique vision of cinema.

– Chase Whale for Indiewire: The Playlist, Sundace Review: Gregg Araki’s ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’

Eva Green’s performance is unbelievable. She’s intense, beautiful and creepy at the same time. Her face, her voice and attitude transpires so much, how come this woman does not have an Oscar? Or is not a goddess in a Marvel movie? 


Green walks a fine line between composure and lunacy, although the director pushes her to one or two over-the-top moments.

– Todd McCarthy for The Hollywood Reporter, ‘White Bird in a Blizzard’ : Sundance Review

G   /   September 27, 2014   /   5 Comments
France 11 September 2014 Deauville Film Festival
USA 25 September 2014 Video on Demand / Limited Release
Canada 26 September 2014 Vancouver International Film Festival
France 15 October 2014  
UK 16 October 2014 London Film Festival
USA 24 October 2014  
Iceland 7 November 2014  
Belgium 12 November 2014  
Netherlands 20 November 2014
G   /   September 16, 2014   /   0 Comments

White Bird in a Blizzard will be shown during BFI’s London Film Festival next month which runs between October 8-19.

  • Director Gregg Araki
  • Producers Pascal Caucheteux, Sebastien K. Lemercier, Alix Madigan-Yorkin, Pavlina Hatoupis
  • Screenwriter Gregg Araki
  • With Shailene Woodley, Eva Green, Christopher Meloni, Gabourey Sidibe
  • USA 2014
  • 90 mins
  • UK distribution Altitude Film Distribution

As soon as the Cocteau Twins’ shoegazing ‘Sea Swallow Me’ kicks in over the luminous haze of the opening credits, it’s clear we’re in Gregg Araki territory, and with his latest creation the New Queer Cinema alumna continues to explore his favourite obsessions; sex, mortality and adolescence. An impressionistic adaptation of Laura Kasischke’s novel, the film follows Kat, a sexually adventurous teen dealing with the fallout from her mother’s unexplained disappearance. Battling her own teenage crises, Kat must make sense of her broken family, and face the dark realities that exist at its core. Styled with a dreamy sense of hyper-reality, and featuring a deliciously unhinged performance from Eva Green, White Bird in a Blizzard is every bit as formally exciting as we would expect from Araki, and every bit as rebellious in its examination of the agonies and ecstasies of young adulthood.

– Michael Blyth

Here’s the screening schedule during the festival:

  • Oct 16, 2014 9:00 PM
  • Vue West End Cinema, Screen 5
  • Oct 18, 2014 1:00 PM
  • Hackney Picturehouse, Screen 1

Festival Full Film Programme List HERE.

G   /   September 15, 2014   /   0 Comments

The Salvation will be released in Russia on November 6, 2014


Other release dates:

October 2, 2014 – UK

October 9, 2014 – Germany

November 6, 2014 – The Netherlands


Future release dates to other countries and territories will be posted here once they are available.

G   /   September 12, 2014   /   1 Comment

300:Rise of an Empire is now available in Digital HD and on 3D, Blu-Ray and DVD on September 29.

G   /   September 11, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Scott Roxborough

UPIE will release Kristian Levering’s feature, co-starring Eva Green, across Latin America, Eastern Europe and South Africa

Universal Pictures International Entertainment (UPIE) has picked up Kristian Levring’s western The Salvation, featuring Hannibal star Mads Mikkelsen, for multiple international territories.

In a deal announced in Toronto, UPIE acquired The Salvation for all of Latin America, Eastern Europe and South Africa.

TrustNordisk is handling international sales on the feature, which co-stars Eva Green. Trust’s head of sales Susan Wendt negotiated the deal.

“(This deal) strongly indicates that the international market place is more than ready for a western of Scandinavian origin,” Wendt said.

The Salvation, co-written by Levring and Denmark’s Anders Thomas Jensen (In a Better World) features an ensemble cast that includes Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Mikael Persbrandt,Jonathan Pryce and French soccer star turned actor Eric Cantona.

Mikkelsen stars as a Danish settler in 19th century America who sets out to avenge his family.

Buyers jumped on the film after its premiere as a midnight screening in Cannes, with IFC Films picking up North American rights, Concorde taking Germany and Austria and Tohokushinsha acquiring Japanese rights, among several other deals.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

G   /   September 10, 2014   /   3 Comments

By Aleigha Spinks

Eva Green

Sorry, ladies! It is the year of Eva Green! This French beauty is WERKIN’ in 2014, pumping out four films and a hit TV show! Although Green tries to stay out of the eye of the public, no one can help but take notice of this woman being everywhere! ‘Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” was just released in the U.S. this past Friday, and Green plays the actual dame to kill for. I rest my case.

What You Should be Watching: ‘Penny Dreadful.’ The perfect combination of creepy gothic literature plot lines and fantastic acting! Find it on Showtime!

Film You Should Watch: ‘The Dreamers.’ It’s my favorite film of all time. That’s really saying something!

Look Out For: ‘Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children.’ Set to begin shooting in early 2015. Green just signed on to play the title character and Tim Burton will be directing it! I’ve never been this excited!

Read the rest of the list HERE.

Source: Froth Magazine