Archive for the ‘Sin City: A Dame to Kill For’ Category
G   /   July 08, 2016   /   3 Comments

by Drew McWeeny

The first real rabid Penny Dreadful fan I talked to was Greg Ellwood here at HitFix. He was a steadfast believer the entire time it was on the air, and he encouraged me to watch it. I was busy cutting the cord, though, moving away from cable subscriptions. I had no cable in the house, none in my office, and chose not to watch anything on TV. I used Hulu, Netflix, HBO Now, Amazon Prime. And if a show didn’t land in one of the services I used, then it just went on a list of things to watch someday. Maybe.

Today is that day for Penny Dreadful for me. After Greg, the person who really picked up that ongoing advocacy for the show was Brian Duffield, who shares my deep abiding love of Eva Green’s work, and he has always been insistent that I was missing some of her very best work by not finding a way to watch the show. I couldn’t justify all of the expense for one title, though. I just waited, and when I moved into my new apartment this week, I finally reversed course, buying a cable/Internet bundle with a very healthy On Demand library. I checked to see if I had a Showtime folder, and then checked to see if they had all of the Penny Dreadful episodes, and just as I got excited about that, Netflix also added the series, although only the first two seasons.

It was suddenly abundantly available and so I put on the first one this morning while working, and that rolled right into the second one, and all of a sudden, there was Eva Green, and there was this seance, and she grabbed this script by the neck and cracked it open and drank the marrow and never once blinked, damn near staring the audience down, daring them to look away.

That’s Eva Green, though. From the moment she appeared in The Dreamers thirteen years ago, she made it clear that she was no one’s fantasy, no one’s object, no one’s simple fantasy. She is willing to follow a good piece of material anywhere, and watching her tear into good writing is one of the great pleasures of film these days. When I spoke to her about her work in 300: Rise Of An Empire, I was practically levitating because it’s such a knowing, accomplished piece of work. She read that script, she got exactly how to make that character spring to vivid life, and she dug in unabashedly. I don’t think Sin City: A Dame To Kill For is very good, but she positively skins it. She leans into the stereotypes that Frank Miller’s using and she twists them all into her own particular versions of them. When she played “the Bond girl” in Casino Royale, she ended up making Vesper into something just as morally and emotionally complicated as the original Ian Fleming conception of the character, if not more so.

Tim Burton’s Dark Shadows has 99 problems, but Eva Green ain’t one. She showed up to that film to play, and she owns Johnny Depp in every scene in the film. Seems apt. In a world where men get to be character actors for decades, building rich galleries of portrayals of a wide range of types and voices and backstories, women are often relegated to teasing out variations on a fairly limited range of roles. Eva Green has never allowed herself to be held back by that, though, and when a filmmaker understands just what a rich collaborator Green can be, it seems like there’s no limit to the rewards that the finished film will reap. She should have the kind of career Depp has, and it seems like she is forcing the industry to bend to that idea instead of her having to give up and just take the girlfriend or wife roles like everyone else.

Today is her birthday, and I don’t particularly care what number it is. What I care about is watching the rest of this series in the weeks ahead, and savoring the way a TV show, especially today as the caliber of writing seems to have risen across the board, allows a great actor to do something they can never do in film, living in a character’s skin over time, building in a million details that make the character even more vivid, even more real. And if I could give her one birthday present, it would be the promise that no one will ever do to her work what Ridley Scott did when he cut the theatrical version of Kingdom Of Heaven in 2005. Her character had a son in the film who played an essential role, but when Scott was pushed to create a theatrical version of the film that was an acceptable length, he chose to cut her son from the movie completely, and it destroyed her character in a way that was remarkable. It was only once I saw the longer cut that I realized just how impressive her work was, and how much William Monahan had given her to do. Here’s hoping that as she continues to move from role to role, filmmakers rise to the challenge and they write strong, smart, eccentric roles for her to play. I’m looking forward to seeing her play Miss Peregrine in Tim Burton’s Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children, and you can see the latest trailer for it below. But I want more for her. I want her to conquer. I want her to find a filmmaker who is excited by what she brings to a collaboration. I want Hollywood to deserve her.

In the meantime, I’ve got lots more Penny Dreadful to get to. Celebrate her birthday right and join me if you’re also been missing out.

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Stef   /   March 01, 2016   /   0 Comments

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– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2014 > Soul (Greece) – June/July 2014

G   /   June 13, 2015   /   1 Comment

By Julie Schott

Why the French actress is “becoming very LA.”

Sometimes Penny Dreadful star Eva Green wishes she could switch places with her twin sister and enjoy the luxury of anonymity. “She has an amazing life in Italy. She’s married to a count,” Green says. “I wish I could be her sometimes. She’s more down to earth.” When the French actress wants to disappear–a difficult feat after her mega-sexy turn in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For–she puts on her “teenager” uniform: “black t-shirt, black leggings, no makeup.”

But her signature jet-black hair, red lips, and, let’s be honest, cleavage make it impossible to blend in. We want to know all of her beauty secrets. Here, Green shares her thoughts on hair, nutrition, and nude scene prep.

ON THE PERFECT RED LIP:

I would do a red lip [on the red carpet], a flashy red lip, bada-boom. Otherwise, I’m useless. I love M.A.C or NARS pigments. Ruby Woo or Lady Danger.

ON SKINCARE:

I’m a vampire; I use a lot of sun cream. Skinceuticals Ultimate UV Defense is very good. The less you go in the sun the better. I moisturize with Avene. It’s a French brand that’s really good.

ON HER HAIR REGIMEN:

I wash my hair quickly. L’Oréal Absolut Repair has amazing conditioner and shampoo; it makes your hair thicker and shiny. I’m not just saying that because I’m a L’Oréal Professionnel ambassador! I dyed my hair for the first time when I was 15 and it stayed. I like dark because it makes my skin pop and it’s more me. I work with Orla Carroll for hair on shoots.

ON NUTRITION:

I’m becoming very LA. I drink lots of water and eat lots of green vegetables. I’m doing lots of juices at the moment. I kind of do apple, kale, carrot. I’ve got a fancy juicer. I started feeling very tired and everybody was like ‘You should try the juicing,’ but I really love it. I felt very weak. It was a revelation. And only organic fruit and vegetables. There’s so many pesticides and shit. I discovered the book by Dr. Fuhrman where he talks about juicing and eating mainly vegetables.

ON NUDE SCENE PREP:

As an actor, it’s not like a porn star. The role is not gratuitous and I kind of detach myself if I have to do a nude scene. For the sequel of 300, I did a lot of core training and that kind of work because my character was a warrior—[it needed] to be believable [that I could] kick some ass. Two or three months of training for five hours a day and I loved it. Your muscles are getting stronger. It’s like a drug almost, you feel addicted, but then on your own it’s so hard. You don’t have somebody kicking your ass every morning. I go for a run every day, I do elliptical, I do stretching. I run like 30 minutes—it’s for the head.

ON SOCIAL ANXIETY:

I’m like a cave woman. I wish I could hang out in a big social place and being very open, but I’m not like that. Being shy was a real problem in school. I don’t feel very comfortable. I have force myself to go out. At events, it’s part of the job. I see it as a game. Otherwise I’m very invisible. I prefer to float around.

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G   /   May 05, 2015   /   0 Comments

“I love extremes”

Fatale in Sin City, possessed in Penny Dreadful, the actress with 50 shades of dark is now shooting the new Tim Burton film. Today, the bewitched muse of L’Oréal Professionnel dreams of comedy.

Daughter of a cinema icon of the 70’s – paragon of the sexy and cheeky French – and of a Swedish dentist, Eva Green resembles nobody else, even if she comes with a twin sister the story reveals nothing about but the name. 

The chosen one, it’s her. Eva Green. Even if it may sound like a pseudonym, it isn’t one. Eva, Ève, biblical name of legendary echo and cinematographic reminiscence – Losey, Mankiewicz. Green : the green of her eyes? They’re blue, huge and particularly expressive. Back in the days of mute cinema, she would have made acarnage. Although it would have been a shame, her low voice is a treasure.

G   /   March 11, 2015   /   0 Comments

There are few experiences in modern cinema quite as intoxicating as watching Eva Green behaving badly. Whether she’s an American housewife on the verge of a nervous breakdown in White Bird in a Blizzard, or fixing those deep turquoise eyes on her oppressors in the revenge western The Salvation, or wrestling demons in the TV series Penny Dreadful, it’s impossible to tear your gaze away.

Green is an enigma, hiding in plain sight. She’s a femme fatale with as many female admirers as male ones, a Bond girl who all but ate Bond for breakfast. Her beauty is of the troubling sort that drives prim conformists mad – they’re forever wanting her to fix her teeth, go easy on the eye make-up, tone down the witchiness and look like everyone else.

Read the full article here on telegraph.co.uk.

G   /   February 05, 2015   /   2 Comments

By Katina Vangopoulos

From getting her acting start in Bertolucci film The Dreamers, Eva Green has spent the last decade on some of Hollywood’s biggest movie sets working with Ridley Scott and Robert Rodriguez to becoming a Bond girl. As her latest turn in White Bird in a Blizzard makes its debut on Blu-Ray, here’s a look at three Eva Green performances that lend to her standing as a modern femme fatale.

 

1. Vesper Lynd, Casino Royale

In what is arguably the best James Bond outing ever, Green is her most effective as the only woman to ever truly gain 007’s affection. Vesper Lynd is a woman torn between right or wrong as she is forced to play for both sides. But her love for Bond is real, Green able to switch from smouldering to caring with ease before breaking the action hero’s heart. As an unconventional Bond girl this not only made Green a star to be noticed, but made Casino Royale what it is – a Bond film with heart.

2. Ava Lord, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

Frank Miller’s favourite Sin City creation came to life in a sequel nearly 10 years in the making, and Green revels in the neo-noir world of his imagining. Her turn as the dame of the title is the centrepiece of the film as she controls everyone and everything. Green is her most seductive as Ava, luring hapless men into a false sense of love and security. It’s safe to say she wasn’t too afraid to get her clothes off in the name of art either.

3. Angelique Bouchard, Dark Shadows

While the film as a whole was a bit of a jumbled effort by Tim Burton, Green is given a lot of room to ham up the femme fatale stereotype as Angelique, the witch obsessed with Johnny Depp’s Barnabas. She plays Angelique as a straightshooter with conviction, a businesswoman who knows what she wants. But her pining for Barnabas brings a lighter, near-comical side to the character, a point of difference for Green who is otherwise used to dramatic roles.

Source: Movie Mezzanine

G   /   December 30, 2014   /   19 Comments

No one can deny that 2014 is such an epic year for Eva and as we look back to the busy, crazy and hands down amazing year that has been, let us know of your favorite Eva Green moments from this year!

EGW-YearEnd2014

1) Favorite Eva Green Project of 2014

2) Favorite Eva Green Character of 2014

3) Favorite Eva Green Red Carpet Moment of 2014

4) Favorite Eva Green Quote of 2014

5) Favorite Eva Green Character Quote of 2014

Share your thoughts, choices and hopes for the coming year with other fans on the comment section. Here’s to a promising and successful 2015 for Eva! Cheers!

G   /   November 27, 2014   /   8 Comments

By Fernanda Baldioti

 

The star of  calendar 2015, the french actress collects stuffed animals and only watch movies on plane

LONDON – At first glance, the production can cause impact: dress and red lipstick, and Louboutin sandals and a powerful make-up  worthy of a diva of the cinema. But the look that Eva Green wore last Wednesday in a suite at the Ace Hotel in London, to launch the 2015 Calendar of Campari, is almost a costume, hand-picked for her to play one of the roles that is considered more difficult: to be herself.

“I hate it when, in a few photoshoots, I have to pose in front and smiling. Therefore I prefer to embody a character, with beautiful clothes, heavy makeup. It’s like an armor.” she explains, who under the lens of the prestigious German photographer Julia Fullerton-Batten gave life to the stories of twelve classic drinks that are based on traditional Italian drink .

But hiding behind her characters is not the only tactic Eva Green does to overcome shyness and flourish her best-known facet of femme fatale in movies. Considered one of the sexiest women in the cinema, the French actress, who played Bond girl Vesper Lynd in “Casino Royale” (2006), calls attention not to have stunning curves. Nor is it the kind that is making faces to test your power of conquest. Eva prefers a game of seduction less obvious, which attracts more by the atmosphere of mystery that she creates around herself, starting with the choice of enigmatic role such as the witch Serafina Pekkala  in “The Golden Compass” (2007); the witch Angelique , in “Shadows of the Night” (2012), and currently the scary Vanessa Ives, in the series “Penny Dreadful”.

“The mysterious people who have secrets and are not obvious, are more attractive, more interesting. We lost the mystery in our society. With the internet, it no longer exists. I find this sad.”, she philosophizes, that makes a point of staying away from social networks: “I  use  my iPhone basically to exchange emails and take pictures.”

Off screen, without the typical supernatural powers of some of her characters, Eva keeps the element of suspense from day to day displaying a goth look: black clothing, smoky eyes and blond hair dyed black dramatically parted to the side. Not to mention the eccentric habits, such as a passion for taxidermy. Simply enter the living room of her house  to come across some skulls and a series of stuffed animals (ranging from birds to an aurochs, an extinct species of bulls).”They find me strange because I have these things. And still think I collect art pieces. I love art, but this is a myth.” she says.

The exotic decor contrasts with the classic beauty, her soft voice  and the almost demure way of the actress, who considers herself an “old lady” and not think twice before giving up a party to stay at home surrounded by friends and even alone: “I do not say lonely, but I like being myself. I am very quiet. For me, the less we say the better. I dont like to spend hours on the phone. I’m a strange animal…” she defined herself, who, however, does not dispense from an invitation to eat well. “I love food but do not have much patience for cooking. I prefer to spend my money going to good restaurants.”

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G   /   November 18, 2014   /   2 Comments

The Sin City actress said there are not enough acting roles for women.

Eva Green believes sexism is still an issue in Hollywood and there are not enough good roles for women – but television is slowly changing things. The actress is shooting the second series of the Showtime and Sky TV horror Penny Dreadful.

Green told the Standard: “There are simply not enough good roles for women and for the last 20 years it has been so male-dominated and continues to be so.” But she added: “Television is perhaps changing the shape of the industry. The special gift of long-format scripted drama in TV means you can explore characters in far more depth.”

The 34-year-old is the face of Campari’s 2015 calendar. In pictures taken by fine art photographer Julia Fullerton-Batten, Green can be seen dressed in custom made gowns with a Campari drink in hand as she drapes her arm over the wheel of time, packs a suitcase and takes to the boxing ring.

Green follows in the footsteps of Uma Thurman and Penelope Cruz.

Source: London Evening Standard

G   /   November 09, 2014   /   2 Comments

By George Driver

 

We caught up with our fav Bond girl, and Sin City siren, Eva Green to chat all things Casino Royale, loving Cate Blanchett and why she’ll never get Facebook.

 

She’s the smoulderingly sexy French actress we wish we could call our own, the coolest Bond girl since Pussy Galore appeared on our screens and a secret Catherine Tate obsessive. We caught up with actress Eva Green as she follows in the footsteps of Uma Thurman and Penelope Cruz as Campari’s latest calendar girl. 

 

InStyle: You’ve played a Bond girl, three witches, an Arabian princess… what would your dream role be?

Eva: I’d love to do something with Mike Leigh, something quite raw. People have a tendency of putting me in the box of the femme fatale so I’m quite sick of that. I’ve played other roles but it seems that’s what people see me as, just hair and makeup and I wish people would see beyond that.

 

InStyle: Do you do funny?

Eva: Well, I was obsessed with Catherine Tate for a while… I’d love to do a comedy but it’s quite difficult to find a great one. I’d love to do a dark comedy, I like a dark sense of humour. I’d love to find the right one and be brave enough to do it.

 

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G   /   October 25, 2014   /   3 Comments

Eva Green

Her magnetic allure is the key to her inscrutable sensuality. She’s gorgeous, fragile, and utterly irresistible

 

You needed a really special woman to irremediably break James Bond’s heart: an inscrutable woman able to convey contrasting sentiments such as fragility, determination, fear, sensuality, desperation and mystery with just a glance. That would be Eva Green, the actress who played Vesper Lynd, the great love of Daniel Craig’s 007. Hers is not a stage name, but she followed in the footsteps of her mother, the French actress Marlène  Jobert. “In the beginning, my mother kept telling me not to choose this career because it is a cruel world and I’m very fragile. Perhaps I was also afraid of being compared to her, not only in terms of a mother-daughter relationship, but also on a professional level.” When you meet Eva for the first time, you are struck by her beauty and by her magnetic allure, those slightly guarded smoky eyes, dusky voice, and disarming shyness. “I know I’m vulnerable, extremely shy and insecure. I feel I can only truly express myself when I’m acting.”

Discovered by Bernardo Bertolucci, who launched her in the film The Dreamers in 2003, Eva became internationally famous with Casino Royale. It was, in a certain sense, an opportunity that turned out to be a mixed blessing. It made her one of the most famous and unforgettable Bond girls, but it also transformed her, despite herself, into the femme fatale archetype that every director wants. That is why she is twice as happy today to be the heroine of the action fantasy flick 300 – Rise of an Empire. In it, she is Artemisia, the warrior queen thirsting for revenge. It is a very virile and physical role. “I like having to handle a sword and fight like a man. What girl wouldn’t be happy to be a man for at least one day?” But that was just an interlude because Eva has gone back to being the dark, sensual, and enigmatic actress that we were accustomed to seeing on the screen. Whether it is on TV, with the series Penny Dreadful where she is Vanessa Ives, an unsettling girl from a good family possessed by evil spirits in Victorian London, or in the movies as Ava Lord, “the dame to kill for” in the next Sin City, Eva is quite the irresistible femme fatale.

 

Source: Vogue Italia

By Maria Grazia Meda, excerpt from Vogue Italia, September 2014, n. 769, p.348  Published: 09/15/2014 – 07:00

 

 

G   /   September 09, 2014   /   4 Comments

By Jason Shawhan

A Dame to Kill For is the sequel to 2005’s Sin City in the most literal way. Thematically, it’s part of a chain of adolescent, hyperviolent misogynist fantasies going back to 1980’s Heavy Metal: hard-boiled men who know the languages of violence and betrayal, and an assortment of noble virgins and streetwise whores to pepper the narrative with occasional frissons to distract from the murder and double-crossing. This is more of the same, but with one noticeable upgrade that allows co-directors Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller to claim some of the zeitgeist.

A Dame to Kill For is a must-see because of the transcendent performance of Eva Green. Much as she did with 300: Rise of the Empire earlier this year, she steps into a digital backlot and commits wholeheartedly to whatever the film requires. She’s got a gift for elevating material that has in 2014 alone made two sequels that nobody asked for into essential summer flicks, and it’s all due to force of will and a lack of inhibitions.

She’s always been a worthwhile screen presence, but it seems like she just recently found her groove — her Showtime series, Penny Dreadful, is a gleeful and atmospheric masterpiece of horror’s grand history, and she’s racking up great notices in films that are otherwise thrown to the hounds.

Hers is a remarkable face. She has a distinctive look, one that recalls screen beauties of the Golden Age of Hollywood; you realize that Green could have been a star at any point in Hollywood history since the ’20s. She’s got a brassy, glam sensibility that calls to mind Bergman, Bacall and Hepburn, but with the devilish sense of humor (and willingness to deploy the goods) of early ‘90s Sharon Stone.

As it stands, Green and Mickey Rourke are the only cast members who seem like they could actually pull off real noir — not just the monochromatic karaoke of so much of the Sin City franchise.

The rest is mostly a muddle. A Dame to Kill For jumps around in time, trying to serve as a prequel and a sequel to the 2005 original, but there’s a specific point where at least several months pass and there is no indication given to the viewer that this has happened. As always, if you’re engrossed in a story, it wouldn’t matter. If it weren’t for Green’s dynamic energy and carnal joie de vivre — and a competently funky Lady Gaga cameo that delivers classic Marisa Tomei realness — you’d be able to pinpoint the exact moment that the film loses its bearings.

Its box-office disaster last weekend doesn’t bode well, but let’s hope this film provides the impetus for an Eva Green/Angelina Jolie buddy film where they kick all ass. I would be there opening day, and you should be too.

Source: Nashville Scene

G   /   September 01, 2014   /   4 Comments

Eva Green

Being pretty and talented is barely enough to cause a ripple in Hollywood. And if you want to really make waves, to take roles for the art instead of just the paycheck, you need to be a part of that magical Five Percent—that group with a maddening alchemy of good looks, preternatural skill, and mysterious intangibles that elevate them above us mere mortals. Eva Green is one of those people. She’s stunning. She’s possessed of a ferocious talent. She’s fucking crazy on screen, and through quiet seduction, she brought the summer of 2014 to its knees.

It started when she became the beating black heart of this spring’s 300: Rise of an Empire, making an otherwise unnecessary sequel worth the price of admission thanks to her frightening, powerful, sexy Artemisia. Then she laced up her corset to anchor Showtime’s Penny Dreadful, playing the gothic temptress Vanessa Ives to maximum slow-burn effect. Then she graduated from dreadful to sinful in the long-awaited Sin City: A Dame To Kill For. Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez’s joint venture may be crashing headlong into the crushing expectations of its hype, but the critics are hailing Green, with outlets like The Hollywood ReporterVariety, and WIRED calling her performance as the titular dame representative of everything the movie could have been if it had lived up to its promise.

Green has been chewing up screens with fearless role selections and uncompromising performances since breaking out in Bernardo Bertolucci’s 2003 film The Dreamers. Later this fall she’ll do it again, starring alongside Shailene Woodley in White Bird in a Blizzard, but for now, the summer is hers. (by Jordan Crucchiola)

 

Rest of the list HERE.

Source: Wired

G   /   August 29, 2014   /   4 Comments

Eva Green first made a splash as an actress by appearing nude in Bernardo Bertolucci’s sexually-charged 2003 film, The Dreamers. Now, just over a decade later, the former Bond girl (she played Vesper Lynd in Casino Royale) is again making waves as the oft-naked femme fatale in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, the long-awaited sequel to the original 2005 film. Even the poster for the film was banned in the US for showing the outline of Green’s ample bosom under a white shirt. None of this is of much concern to the fearless French actress, however, who has few qualms about nudity.

“I don’t understand the fuss,” Green says. “No one in Europe pays much attention to nudity, and even though I’m not particularly desperate to show my boobs, I was willing to do it for this film because it’s shot with such artistry and beauty.

“I had to almost forget that I was naked so that I would stop worrying or feeling self-conscious when I was standing naked in front of a crew wearing nothing but a thong. You don’t have any other choice.”

Directed by Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller (the author of the Sin City graphic novels), A Dame to Kill For sees Jessica Alba return to her role as exotic dancer Nancy Callahan who is determined to avenge herself against her tormentors. While Alba once again declined to appear naked, Green’s sensational physique is fully on display as femme fatale Ava Lord whose psychotic delight in sending men to their doom makes this of the most memorable female performances in years.

The visually-stunning, avant-garde film was shot in 3D using green screen technology where the actors worked on a bare set with the background filled in later during the post-production process. The cast includes original Sin City actors Mickey Rourke, Bruce Willis, Rosario Dawson and Benicio Del Toro while Josh Brolin and Joseph Gordon-Levitt join Green as key newcomers.

The 34-year-old Eva Green is also about to start filming the second season of the Showtime TV series, Penny Dreadful, a Victorian era horror/thriller co-starring Timothy Dalton and Josh Hartnett. She will also be seen in The Salvation, a western feature that reunites her with her Casino Royale co-star, Mads Mikkelsen. Some of Green’s recent films include this year’s 300: Rise of an Empire, and Dark Shadows (2012), which co-starred Johnny Depp.

Eva Green (her last name comes from her Swedish dentist father and is pronounced “Gren”) is currently single and lives in the Primrose Hill section of London. Her mother is retired French actress Marlene Jobert. Eva also has a non-identical twin sister, Joy, who is married to an Italian count from the Antinori winemaking family and lives in Normandy.

 

THE INTERVIEW

Q: Eva, your appearance as Ava Lord in this Sin City sequel is causing a minor sensation in the press. Do you think the amount of nudity involved is justified?

GREEN: I wouldn’t have done the film if I didn’t think that the nudity was handled in a beautiful and sensual way… I trusted Robert (Rodriguez). He came to my trailer and swore to me that I would look amazing with the right lighting and shadows. You feel quite vulnerable and exposed of course when you are naked on a set. You also feel silly standing naked with the green screen behind you and you’re all alone on a stage. It’s not that sexy at all when you’re doing scenes naked. But you trust Robert and Frank’s vision and it looks stunning. It’s not vulgar, it’s not indecent – it’s art.

Q: Is the nudity meant to shock audiences?

GREEN: I don’t think so. It’s being faithful to the atmosphere of the graphic novels that Frank Miller wrote and my character is the archetypal femme fatale. Ava uses her body as a means of manipulating men and getting them to do anything she wants.

Nudity is a weapon for her. I’m playing ‘a dame to kill for’ as the title says, and her physical and psychological aura is so strong that she literally drives men so crazy that they are willing to kill or be killed for her.

Q: You’ve done nudity before, including a memorable nude scene in your first film, The Dreamers. Does it bother you that nudity seems to cause so much of a fuss in some countries?

GREEN: I am a bit frustrated with all the talk about my nude or sex scenes. I’m not a porn actress! (Laughs) But sometimes if you’re going to play a character there’s going to be sex involved because that’s a very normal aspect of life and most people are naked when they f**k! Nudity is a lot easier to play than doing a sex scene which can feel cold and mechanical because you’re being told to put your hand here or there or the actor is told to put his hand on your boob and then kiss your breasts and so on. That can be much more awkward although if you’re shooting a sex scene all day it just becomes boring after a while.

Q: Is it fun to play such a dark character like you do in Sin City?

GREEN: You enjoy the sense of power she has. She’s the ultimate kind of man-eater, a total fantasy who changes her personality and behaviour to transform herself into exactly what men desire and what any given man wants her to be. Ava has the kind of power that a lot of women would like to have over men! (Laughs)

She’s a true chameleon and it was interesting to be able to play all the variations of her character – one moment she’s a damsel in distress and the next moment she’s this sensual goddess and then she’s a total bitch. She’s a psychopath with absolutely zero sense of right or wrong and no conscience whatsoever and definitely the most evil woman I’ve ever played or could imagine playing.

Q: What was it like working with such an interesting cast?

GREEN: I was very excited to be asked to do the film. I was cast at the last moment, about a week before shooting started, but I was so happy to be part of it. I was also very happy to get to work with Josh Brolin whom I’ve admired for many years. He brings so much intensity and emotion to his facial expressions and he has these sharp features that are perfect for the extreme character he plays.

Q: The film is shot entirely on a empty set with a green screen in the background. How difficult is it to act with no scenery or props of any kind?

GREEN: It’s very close to being on stage. When you do theatre, the furniture and background is usually very minimal you don’t pay any attention to the props. All your energy is focused on the other actor or actors you’re playing your scene with. That’s how it was making this film. There’s just the crew around you and you have to imagine the setting that’s eventually going to be filled in later. I had read the graphic novels before starting work on the film and so I had a good understanding of the surroundings.

You also get used to miming opening a door or looking in certain directions where something is supposed to be happening or knowing where the walls are supposed to be. It takes a bit of discipline but it also intensifies your work because your entire concentration is on the other actor.

Q: You tend to play extreme characters. Do you think the public has a strange perception of you?

GREEN: (Laughs) Most people have this image of me as a very dark kind of woman or a real bitch. It probably doesn’t help that I like to wear black a lot and that adds to the impression that I’m very cold or distant. I should probably try to play more balanced kinds of characters but often the juiciest roles for women are the darker characters. But it would be nice to do a good love story once in a while although no one thinks of me when it comes to those kinds of films.

Q: Most people don’t know that you’re actually quite fair-haired in real life?

GREEN: I’m fairly blonde. I’ve been dyeing my hair black since I was 15 and I’ve stuck with that look ever since. It’s my way of hiding myself I suppose. I think I look more interesting with dark hair. It’s part of my self-image and we all have a darker side. I like to put masks on sometimes because I haven’t always been that confident and you fall into the trap of continuing to hide your real self even though you’ve changed and grown a lot as an individual. I feel more open but it’s not always easy for me to show that.

Q: Are you a fairly fearless person?

GREEN: Oh, no! I can be confident about some things in my life but I often become very anxious when I’m thinking about a film and I’m not sure how to approach my character. I go up and down. Some days I will feel very strong and determined and other days I will feel lost in life and wondering what I’m doing. I would like to be more like my mum who is much tougher than I am.

Q: You’ve appeared in some big films of late like 300 and Dark Shadows. Do you think A Dame to Kill for will lead to a lot more work for you?

GREEN: I don’t know. I hope so! (Laughs) I always feel it’s a miracle when I get offered any role. I’m surprised that I’m allowed to do this job. Making movies is my way of living out different kinds of fantasies and that’s one of the main reasons I love acting so much.

I’m still trying to be less intellectual in my approach to my work and more instinctual, though. I would like to be more natural in the way I get into my characters and let myself rely on my instincts more. I’m naturally shy and introverted and it’s a side of myself that acting helps me overcome. But it’s a slow process.

Q: You’re often portrayed as a sex symbol and your Sin City film will probably add to that kind of image. How do you feel about that?

GREEN: I have always felt very self-conscious about my appearance. I have never seen myself as being beautiful the way I am sometimes described in the media. Whenever I spend time in Los Angeles I tend to feel ugly compared to all the beautiful women there. It’s not part of the way I see myself at all.

Q: Are you confident when it comes to love?

GREEN: It’s beautiful to feel intense passion but it’s also dangerous. It’s hard to have your heart broken and you want to protect yourself from being hurt again. But you have to be able to grow and learn with each relationship and hope you find love.

Source: Yahoo

G   /   August 28, 2014   /   1 Comment

Here are some more reviews on Eva’s performance in Sin City: A Dame To Kill For. Click on the Source links for the full film review.

 

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For is more low-key than the first Sin City, but it’s also a more enjoyable romp thanks to another grand Eva Green star turn….For reasons I cannot entirely justify, I was less annoyed by both factors this time around. Maybe I’m just more forgiving in my old age. Or maybe Eva Green makes everything better….Eva Green of course plays the titular “dame to kill for,” which is a fine example of truth in advertising. Just as she almost single-handedly elevated 300: Rise of an Empire above its predecessor earlier this year, Ms. Green powers the main story and provides a solid counter-balance to the original film in which most of the women were victims. 

– Scott Mendelson for Forbes, Review: Eva Green Owns ‘Sin City: A Dame To Kill For’

Green has described Ava as less a woman — and she is allwoman — than a weapon, an improvised erotic device that explodes in the heart, guts and gonads of every man she meets…As for the sex: that’s Ava. She is the prime force of evil, and Green is the new movie’s reason for being. In a film era that mostly ignores womanly allure for guy-on-guy battles and bromance, Green has played the unregenerate temptress from The Dreamers (her debut) to 300: Rise of an Empire, with the miniseries Camelot and Penny Dreadful in between. But Ava was the role waiting for her. 

– Richard Corliss for TIME, Review: Eva Green is The Dame To Kill For in ‘Sin City 2’

Ms Green, thrillingly cruel, detached and dangerous, offers atonement. She seduces the audience as she seduces her men, with blinding confidence, and keeps the film from sliding towards blandness. The plot and the script might not always be to kill for, but the dame sure is.

– F.S. for Economist, New Film: ‘Sin City: A Dame To Kill For’

The film’s greatest assets are Gordon-Levitt and Green, who remains as coolly aloof as a circling eagle, despite spending much of the film naked in a variety of provocative poses.

– Robbie Collin for The Telegraph, Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For, Review: ‘A Chilly Appeal’