Archive for the ‘Television’ Category
G   /   August 27, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Alison Willmore

How the Sin City: A Dame to Kill For actress walked away with the year’s most macho sequels.

Most of the thrill of the original Sin City is gone in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez’s follow-up to their innovative 2005 graphic-novel adaptation, set in a stylized, digitally engineered world of black and white with splashes of color. The movie, which floundered at the box office when it debuted this past weekend, is just as intensely violent, lurid, and nihilistic as the first one, and this time, it’s in 3D, which lends an added oomph to its sometimes beautiful compositions. But Sin City: A Dame to Kill For is also stupefyingly — 100-plus minutes of just the climax of a story, everything turned up to 11, the characters so interchangeably hard-boiled that it can take a while to realize Josh Brolin is actually playing the same character Clive Owen did in the previous film.

It’s disappointing, except for the one thing Sin City: A Dame to Kill For does have that the first installment didn’t: a scene-stealing Eva Green, who, as Ava Lord, burns a giant hole in the center of the screen. In a movie in which Jessica Alba humps a stage and Mickey Rourke plucks out someone’s eyeball like he’s picking a particularly stubborn daisy, it’s not easy to be the center of attention, but Green easily dominates the gritty, gory affair. Her Ava is less femme fatale than dark deity, a goddess of self-destruction who men can’t help but cower in front of.

And Sin City: A Dame to Kill For isn’t the first hyper-macho Frank Miller sequel this year that Green’s walked away with — as Artemisia, the bloodthirsty villain in March’s 300: Rise of an Empire, she totally bowled over the indistinguishable muscly male lead (Sullivan Stapleton, if you’d forgotten). Ever since her 2003 debut alongside Michael Pitt and Louis Garrel in Bernardo Bertolucci’s racy The Dreamers and her 2006 stint as proto-Bond girl Vesper Lynd…

Green’s proven to be a little too much for Hollywood — too formidable for happily-ever-afters, too much presence to be a character actor, too beautiful to be ignored, and too…goth-y? But in 2014, Green’s been carving out a distinctive career for herself as the scariest and most intimidating of sex symbols, and it’s been awesome to watch.

Aside from that graphic-novel green-screen double feature, the Year of Eva Green has included the actress’s acclaimed turn as troubled psychic Vanessa Ives in Showtime’s Penny Dreadful, in which she shifts between serenely enigmatic, vulnerable, and terrifyingly animalistic. She’s also got upcoming roles as a “deliciously unhinged” mother (per Variety) in Gregg Araki’s White Bird in a Blizzard and a ferocious, mute outlaw’s wife in Kristian Levring’s Western The Salvation, both due out later this year. But it’s her parts in the Miller adaptations that particularly stand out, because they manage to feel subversive in an environment that’s almost toxically heavy on the testosterone.

Miller’s near-parodic odes to the toughest of tough guys can’t help but sideline their female characters — his stories are, underneath the blood and sweat, deeply romantic about the business of being masculine in the most archetypal of ways. The men might die for the women, seek solace in them, get them killed, and avenge them, but the women themselves are rarely the focus. And yet…as Artemisia and Ava, Green disrupts this pattern by refusing to be an object who is primarily gazed at or acted upon. In Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, she’s just as sexualized as her fellow female cast members (including Alba, Rosario Dawson, Jaime King, Jamie Chung, and Juno Temple), but she’s fully in control. When she goes to lure her ex Dwight (Brolin) back after leaving him years earlier to marry a rich man, she shows up nude, in his bed, serene in her certainty that she has him. Her sensuality’s presented as a weapon, and he’s resistant and resentful even as he gives in — and the sex scene, which is strenuously athletic and shot in silhouette, ends with him crouched at her feet, like she’s poised to bite his head off, praying mantis-style.

Ava barely bothers to play the victim, rolling her eyes at the ease with which she wins over one of the cops on the case (Christopher Meloni) by playing on his lust and protective instincts. Both Sin City movies do some ludicrous things in the name of “strong female characters” (like the women of Old Town, who are organized, armed, and impossibly tough, but not tough enough to move on from prostitution to more lucrative crime, and who, btw, also frequently have hearts of gold underneath the dominatrix gear). But Green plays Ava as someone who, while psychotic, is also thoroughly in charge, and who deflates some of the grandiosity the film invests in its male characters’ grand gestures of sacrifice and obsession.

Green’s even more fabulously bonkers as Persia’s ruthless top naval commander in 300: Rise of an Empire, now out on DVD and Blu-ray — sprawling on her throne at sea, manipulating Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro) into somehow transforming into a gilded giant, taking the heads of enemies and then making out with them. Artemisia is a survivor of prolonged violence who remakes herself into a fearsome warrior, and the film never really suggests her thirst for revenge is unfounded, making her feel at least as much antiheroine as antagonist.

Halfway through 300: Rise of an Empire, Artemisia and Themistocles meet for a parley that turns, natch, into more crazy sex. It starts with her grabbing his hair and leads to the two slamming each other into various surfaces around the ship before she tosses him out, leaving him stunned when he goes back to his colleagues. Artemisia’s desire, born out of how pleased she is to have found an opponent who can actually match her, drives the whole love-scene-as-battle-metaphor sequence, and it’s not suggested she’s giving up anything or losing stature because she chooses to act on it.

Artemisia is the lone woman in a world of men, but, as played by Green, she’s neither challenged because of this nor acting as just another one of the boys. She’s her own wild creation, unfettered but readily feminine, whether leaping into battle or donning an increasingly intense series of battle ball gowns (culminating in a dress that includes tasteful golden bone-spikes along the spine).

Green commits to her material, no matter how pulpy, which is why this cartoonishly outsized character, a highly fictionalized version of an actual historical figure, comes so vividly to life. She’s not simply hamming it up — she’s as soulful as she is scary.

Green’s so good in these two watered-down sequels that it’s easy to imagine her kept in similar roles going forward — brash, witchy, and doomed. There are worse things that could happen, but she really deserves more, and Penny Dreadful comes closest to showing her range, from demonic force to unguarded romantic lead. And even in the Showtime drama, her character’s formative moment involved the love of a man who couldn’t keep up with her. But being a force of nature shouldn’t condemn someone to wan roles.

Source: Buzzfeed

 




G   /   August 23, 2014   /   1 Comment

By Kyle Buchanan

“You cannot defeat the Goddess,” says one character in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For. “She cannot die.” He’s referring to Ava Lord, the seductive black widow who gives the film its title, and when she’s played by Eva Green, who can blame him for using heavenly superlatives? There’s always been something otherworldly about Green, who first impressed (and undressed) in Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Dreamers, won best Bond Girl ever honors withCasino Royale, and just this year starred as the formidable Artemesia in 300: Rise of an Empire and toplined the Showtime series Penny Dreadful. A few weeks ago in Los Angeles, the slinky Green met up with Vulture at The Four Seasons to tell us how she got into character for the Robert Rodriguez–directed Sin City, and how she felt about getting out of her clothes for it.

Do you consider yourself an inhibited person when you’re not shooting?
Oh, yes.

So it must surprise you how bold you can appear onscreen, especially in all of Sin City‘s sex scenes.
It’s very ironic, because I’m very shy. People don’t believe me: “She did The Dreamers, and all these other nude scenes!” But I remember telling my publicist, “I’m really naked in Sin City. Just wait.” I don’t know any actor who’s comfortable with nudity, but it’s not gratuitous in this film, because she uses her body as a weapon. Still, in the morning when you have a nude scene, you want to die. You feel quite silly to be in a tiny thong with Josh Brolin, who’s wearing flesh-colored Spanx, and you’re in front of a green screen — like, “This is not happening!” But Robert told us, “I’m going to add lots of shadows, and you’ll look great. I knew that I could trust him.

When you play a character like that, does any of that confidence carry over into your real life?
Maybe it gave me some confidence in doing press, because I used to be very nervous doing interviews for TV — and I’m still not great, I get sweaty — but I got better. At school, I was really shy. If a teacher asked me a question in front of other people, I’d melt. Lots of actors are very scared in real life, actually.

Your characters are so forward with men. Are you?
No. I’m shit. [Laughs.]

How much freedom as an actor did you have in a film like this, where Robert is trying to re-create a lot of the frames from the comic almost exactly?
It’s funny, because I was really worried about that before I started filming: Oh my God, you have to be so still! Can I even move my finger? Can I touch the other actor? And yes, he frames each shot like a painting and you have to hit the mark, and some of the stuff he wants exactly like in the comic book, but it was fine — especially because I had real actors in front of me, because I know some of the other actors didn’t. I wouldn’t have liked that, so I was really lucky.

Did you have to do a lot of work beforehand?
I was cast very last minute, like a week before shooting, and usually I like to prep, so I was panicked: “Oh my God, I have to work on an American accent and find the character, and there’s so little time!” So I watched some film noir, like Barbara Stanwyck in Double Indemnity, because this is so femme fatale. At the beginning, I looked at my character and thought, My God, she’s so evil. There are no cracks in her, and her heart is so hard. I’ve played evil before, but that one was 200 percent evil, so I had to find the jubilation in playing her. I brought my body and my heart to Ava Lord.

And none of the men in this movie can withstand her.
Yeah, she’s quite scary. Quite scary! It would be interesting to do a prequel, just to find out why she’s so hard. Maybe she was traumatized? Or maybe she was born crazy.

What do you get out of doing a show like Penny Dreadful, which is about to go into its second season?
It’s fun, and I love fun. I love playing mad people, actually. My character looks quite guarded and very Victorian and tight, and to be able to let it all out … it’s so fun to be that irreverent. It’s like having a really bad Tourette’s moment.

Do you watch the show? Did you see the seance sequence from your second episode?
No, I haven’t! It’s horrible.

Well, at least watch the show so you can get to the part where Josh Hartnett and Reeve Carney make out.
Oh my God. Oooh! [Laughs.]

Source: Vulture




G   /   August 21, 2014   /   0 Comments

Penny Dreadful’s official soundtrack composed by Abel Korzeniowski is now available to purchase on iTunes and on SHO STORE.

For more information on the soundtrack, including the track list and album cover, click HERE.




G   /   August 18, 2014   /   5 Comments

Per Ms. Eva Green’s GQ (UK) interview, we can officially confirm that she is set to play Miss Peregrine in Tim Burton’s film adaptation of Ransom Rigg’s novel Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. Filming will start on February 2015, right after Penny Dreadful Season 2 wraps up filming.

 




G   /   August 18, 2014   /   2 Comments

By Alice Howarth

 

She became a household name after playing Casino Royale‘s Bond girl in 2006, but now French-born actress Eva Green is courting both new audiences and controversy as she takes on her biggest role yet. Playing femme fatale Ava Lord in the upcoming Sin City sequel, Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For, Green’s teaser poster and trailer was banned in America earlier this month after it was deemed “too sexy” for the nation’s audiences. As the star gears up for her vixen to be unleashed on screen, she talks to GQ about the films she watched to prep for the role, who she’d like to work with next, and why men should never, ever wear cologne…

GQ: What’s the most sinful thing you’ve ever done?
Eva Green: Woah. I can’t tell you [laughs]! I’m a good girl, I’m very wise and a good girl. I was very serious in school.

Do you think the Motion Picture Association of America was too harsh when it banned your ad?
I think so, I mean the film is very beautiful, it’s very artistic. It’s not vulgar at all, it’s actually very decent so I didn’t really understand what all the fuss was about but at least it’s publicity, people will hear about it I guess.

You said that when you were in drama school you “picked the really evil roles [as it’s] a great way to deal with your everyday emotions.” How did you get into character playing a violent, gold digging, vixen?
I watched a lot of film noir. Double Indemnity with Barbara Stanwyck, other films with Bette Davis. Ava Lord is a very extreme femme fatale, she’s really very jaded, she manipulates men, she feels empowered and smarter when she does it, she’s incredibly full-on – nothing is sacred. The main thing is to have fun with those kind of characters. She’s so free and corrupt, she’s just bonkers. It really was so fun to play.

The film features a lot of lingerie. What would be your advice to men buying their girlfriends lingerie as gifts?

I wear a lot of corsets in the movie and I think it’s very sexy, kind of retro and very classy, I think men should definitely buy those.

 What should no man have in his wardrobe?

You know what, I don’t really like perfume. I know it’s not clothing but I prefer when men don’t wear it. I don’t like cologne. It’s as if they’re hiding something. I like perfume as it works on a woman, but on a man they lose something, their manliness. It’s less… animal.

Can you recommend a good book?
Yes. I recently read The Shadow of the Wind by the Spanish writer Carlos Ruiz Zafón. It was a beautiful story and a great book to read on holiday. Very romantic.

Where would you recommend a friend to eat in London?
Definitely St. John’s Bread & Wine on Commercial Street in Shoreditch.

How did you find working on a green-screen stage forSin City 2: A Dame To Kill For?
At first you’re very overwhelmed but then you really get used to it. You know that Robert [Rodriguez, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For co-director] and Frank [Miller, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For co-director] are going to do amazing things post filming. To have real actors to act with is always the main thing when making a movie so that was fun and the atmosphere on set was really gentle, laid back and just incredibly fun.

You’ve called Ava “multidimensional”. Are there any sides of her character that you admire?
She’s very brave, if she wants something she’ll get it no matter who gets hurt. She’s obsessed with money and power. She doesn’t apologise about her behavior and in that sense sometimes I wish I could be a bit more like that. But she does take it to the extreme, because people die for her so I wouldn’t want that, but to have her power would sometimes be helpful.

You’ve said in the past you’d like to go back to the theatre as Hollywood is likely to typecast you as a femme fatale. Were you nervous then about playing the biggest femme fatale of the moment?
No. It depends what the role is, what the project is. With Sin City I didn’t even think twice about it. It’s so fun, she’s quite funny because she’s so extreme, it’s very pleasant to play someone like that. Of course, I don’t want to be typecast as a dark femme fatale my whole life but you know I play Penny Dreadful who is very different from Ava Lord, and I’m about to do another film with Tim Burton, whose character is also very different. I’m not typecast at the moment.

With a cast of beautiful women including Jessica Alba, Rosario Dawson and Jamie Chung was there any female rivalry on set?
Well actually we didn’t meet. They were all finished when I arrived and I arrived last on board. But I met them separately for publicity and they’re lovely girls and they’re really not competitive at all. I just wish I had had some scenes with them. I only had scenes with men, all men [laughs].

Who would you most like to work with next?
There’s so many but I love Matthew McConaughey, I think he’s really intentioned and so interesting. I would also love to work with Marion Cotillard.

What’s next for you?
I’m about to start the second season of Penny Dreadful and then I’m going to start filming on Tim Burton’s new film in February, so I’m going to be busy.

 

Source: GQ (UK)




G   /   August 15, 2014   /   0 Comments




G   /   August 12, 2014   /   1 Comment

Eva Green isn’t religious, but believes in the supernatural.

The 34-year-old actress stars as a spiritualist in TV series Penny Dreadful, which is about a group of people who battle supernatural threats in London, UK. It’s got her thinking about what might be out there, with Eva adamant humans aren’t alone.

“There are forces, yes – I’m not religious but I believe there is something other,” she told British magazine Hello! “One of my friends is a psychic. She doesn’t talk about it because people might think she’s crazy but she has visions and has told me some interesting things about my own life.”

It’s not just spooky things which gives the French actress the shivers. Eva is also terrified of trying out for film and TV roles, which thinking about the state of the world can get her down too.

“Auditions! Lots of things frighten me: nasty people; ruthlessness in the world; oh and flying – I’m terrible at it,” she sighed.

To counteract her feelings of fear, Eva has a few hobbies which keep her chilled. Some of them developed from childhood and she still finds it relaxing to visit the places she’d frequent with her loved ones. Plus she’s added a few more tips into the mix.

“To go for long walks in the mountains, especially Switzerland. I’ve always loved mountains – I went to them with my family when young. The contact with nature makes me feel human. And pampering myself afterwards with a massage is the best treat,” she explained.

Source: Belfast Telegraph




G   /   August 05, 2014   /   0 Comments

By Jonathan Broxton

Penny Dreadful is a Gothic horror/drama series on the American Showtime network, set in Victorian London at the turn of the 19th century. Taking inspiration from the classic writings of Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker, Oscar Wilde and others, as well as the “penny dreadful” magazines which told lurid tales of serial killers, highwaymen and cowboys, creator John Logan re-imagined these classic characters in a new setting, interacting with each other, and working together to defeat an ancient evil. The story follows Ethan Chandler (Josh Hartnett), a charming American gunslinger sojourning in the motherland, who is recruited by the mysterious Vanessa Ives (Eva Green) to help Sir Malcolm Murray (Timothy Dalton), a famed African explorer, rescue his daughter Mina, who he believes has been kidnapped by a vampire-like creature. Needing help of a medical nature, Sir Malcolm also obtains the help of Victor Frankenstein (Harry Treadaway), a brilliant young surgeon, who has a problem of his own: unknown to the others, Frankenstein has been conducting experiments involving death and resurrection, and one of his creations, the fearsome Caliban (Rory Kinnear) has come looking for his father…

The world is in a Golden Age of television at the moment. With massively popular shows such as Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad, House of Cards, Downton Abbey, True Detective, Homeland, Fargo and others airing to enormous critical acclaim, it is currently de rigeur for major movie stars to feature in episodic series where, before, working in TV was considered ‘slumming it’, a step down from theatrical motion pictures. Similarly, television music is undergoing a renaissance of its own, with composers like Bear McCreary, Ramin Djawadi, John Lunn, Nathan Barr and Jeff Beal re-defining the quality of TV scores, and in many cases rivaling the best film music in the 2010s. Now you can add Abel Korzeniowski’s sumptuous music for Penny Dreadful to that list. Korzeniowski has slowly but surely been making a name for himself over the past few years as a composer to be reckoned with, him having received Golden Globe nominations for his scores for A Single Man and W.E. in 2009 and 2011 respectively, and having been the recipient of significant critical acclaim for his work on Romeo & Juliet and Escape from Tomorrow last year.

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G   /   August 04, 2014   /   2 Comments

Source: Abel Korzeniowski’s Facebook Page
Click Here for the Complete Soundtrack Song List and Other Soundtrack Details




G   /   August 03, 2014   /   0 Comments

Penny Dreadful has four main characters based on three Gothic literature: Frankenstein, Dracula and The Picture of Dorian Gray. At San Diego Comic Con 2014, Showtime released three hardcover Special Editions of these books. The books contain original illustrations that were commissioned and oversaw by Penny Dreadful Creator John Logan. Here, we talk to Frankenstein illustrator Louie De Martinis about his craft, working on the book with John Logan and who is his favorite character on the show.

LouieDeMartinis-Frankenstein

 First of all, tell us a little bit about yourself.

I’m a freelance illustrator and comic book artist living in Montreal, Canada. I’ve also worked in the animation industry on background design, storyboards and development art.

 

How did you get started in art and illustration?

As a kid I always loved to draw, and I especially loved reading comic books and watching Saturday morning cartoons. I knew early on that I wanted to pursue a career in art. I began working as a layout artist on the animated feature “Heavy Metal”. I started attending comic book conventions with portfolio in hand and eventually got my first gig as a comic artist and illustrator. I never looked back as they say.

 

Who are some of your favorite artists and/or illustrators and why? Who or what are some of your influences right now?

I really love art, all forms of art. I can go on forever about this but I’ll try to keep it short…IF I can!

Here’s a quick list of artists that inspired me and are still inspiring to this day. Frank Frazetta, Gene Colan, Alex Toth, Neal Adams, Bill Sienkiewicz, Sergio Toppi, Alberto Breccia, Jorge Zaffino, Jean Giraud (aka Moebius) … I could go on and on…..

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G   /   August 01, 2014   /   0 Comments

Penny Dreadful has four main characters based on three Gothic literature: Frankenstein, Dracula and The Picture of Dorian Gray. At San Diego Comic Con 2014, Showtime released three hardcover Special Editions of these books. The books contain original illustrations that were commissioned and oversaw by Penny Dreadful Creator John Logan. Here, we talk to Dracula illustrator Martin Stiff about his craft, working on the book with John Logan and who is his favorite character on the show.

 Martin Stiff-Dracula

First of all, tell us a little bit about yourself.

I’m a writer, designer and illustrator living in London. In my day job, I’m co-director of Amazing15, a design studio specialising in books, magazines, branding and merchandise. We’ve worked on a wide range of diverse projects including Sherlock, Doctor Who and Breaking Bad, and some of our book covers have won awards. On top of all this, for the past few years I’ve been writing and drawing a big award-nominated graphic novel called The Absence which finally saw publication this March from Titan Comics. I’m also married with a couple of kids. Life is busy.

 

How did you get started in art and illustration?

I don’t think I was ever not in art or illustration. Since I’ve been able to hold a pencil I’ve always enjoyed drawing and even from a young age it was always my intention to somehow make a living out of it. I’m lucky enough to have managed to make that happen. I studied illustration at university, spent a few years working in theatre set design and then kind of ended up as a graphic designer which is where I’ve been for the last decade or so. I’m a massive nerd so to be able to work on books and comics and get paid for it is like some kind of crazy dream come true.

 

Who are some of your favorite artists and/or illustrators and why? Who or what are some of your influences right now?

I like a wide variety of artists, but I guess primarily my main influences come from comics. Artists like Dave McKean (Arkham Asylum, Cages) had a huge effect on me when I was a teenager and really beginning to ‘learn’ about art. His use of collage and mixed media to tell the story was massively influential. I’ve always been a big fan of the anthology science fiction comic 2000AD, and the range of artists working on it was hugely inspiring. I tend towards artists that have a lot of energy and movement in their work so love people like Jock and Sean Phillips, Duncan Fegredo and Alex Maleev.

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G   /   July 31, 2014   /   0 Comments

Penny Dreadful has four main characters based on three Gothic literature: Frankenstein, Dracula and The Picture of Dorian Gray. At San Diego Comic Con 2014, Showtime released three hardcover Special Editions of these books. The books contain original illustrations that were commissioned and oversaw by Penny Dreadful Creator John Logan. Here, we talk to The Picture of Dorian Gray illustrator Ian Bass about his craft, working on the book with John Logan and who is his favorite character on the show.

 IanBass-ThePictureofDorianGray

First of all, tell us a little bit about yourself.

I live and work in London which is the best city in the world. I speak French. I am a total geek, I love comics, cartoons and computer games. I was a geek a very, very long time before it was fashionable…I’m also part of a comedy group called Scales of the Unexpected (we won a TV talent show and everything).

 

How did you get started in art and illustration?

I have always loved drawing and have done it as a hobby forever. Professionally it was because a friend of mine needed a concept sketch done of how he wanted his book cover to look. It turned out that his editor really liked it and I got the gig to do the cover and some interior illustrations. That cover went on to win an industry award which was a fantastic start and really encouraged me to pursue illustration as a career.

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G   /   July 26, 2014   /   1 Comment

Penny-Dreadful-Blu-ray

Following the Penny Dreadful panel at Comic-Con where John Logan and the cast answered questions on the making of Season 1 and teased what’s ahead, Showtime announced that the first season will be making its way to Blu-ray and DVD in October:

The acclaimed SHOWTIME® original series PENNY DREADFUL – SEASON ONE will arrive on Blu-ray Disc and DVD October 7, it was announced today during the PENNY DREADFUL panel at San Diego Comic-Con International 2014.

From Showtime Networks, CBS Home Entertainment and Paramount Home Media Distribution, the Blu-ray and DVD collections will include every episode of the series’ first season, celebrated by critics as “scary, seductive, surprising, and smart” (NPR) and “solidly entertaining, well cast and oozing with atmosphere” (Variety). Both Blu-ray and DVD collections also boast extensive special features that delve into the gripping thriller.

From three-time Oscar® nominee John Logan (Skyfall, Hugo, Gladiator) and Oscar winner Sam Mendes (American Beauty, Skyfall),PENNY DREADFUL is a frightening psychosexual drama that weaves together classic horror origin stories into a gripping series that is “moody, mystical and wonderfully twisted” (Cleveland Plain Dealer). PENNY DREADFUL, starring Josh Hartnett (Black Hawk Down), Timothy Dalton (The Living Daylights) and Eva Green (Casino), completely reinvents literature’s most famous characters. Icons of terror such as Victor Frankenstein, Dorian Gray and timeless figures from Dracula join a core of original characters in a dark and brutal quest to save a soul – even as they grapple with their own monstrous temptations.

The series also stars Reeve Carney (Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark), Rory Kinnear (Skyfall), Billie Piper (Doctor Who, Secret Diary of a Call Girl), Danny Sapani (The Bill) and Harry Treadaway (The Lone Ranger). A co-production of Sky Atlantic, PENNY DREADFUL was created, written and executive produced by John Logan and executive produced by Logan’s Desert Wolf Productions, along with Sam Mendes and Pippa Harris (Revolutionary Road, Call The Midwife), both of Neal Street.

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G   /   July 26, 2014   /   1 Comment

Vanessa Ives’ tarot cards has been an important character and storyline tool on Penny Dreadful. Here, we talk to its designer Anaïs Chareyre, about her craft, how the tarot cards came about, working with John Logan and meeting her fellow Frenchwoman Eva Green.

 Episode 101

How did you get started in art and illustration?

I started as a child, my grandmother Francine used to teach me drawing and painting, she is an amazing oil painter herself. For a long time I only drew animals actually, which revealed to be quite useful for Penny Dreadful Tarot cards! I always had this in my life, I was a shy little girl and I preferred to draw rather than play with other kids.

 

Who are some of your favorite artists and/or illustrators and why? Who or what are some of your influences right now?

Tough question, my favorite traditional painter would be Caravaggio, and his today-incarnation that we call Roberto Ferri. Their paintings never fail to amaze me! I have a huge list of artists that I follow constantly, it’s quite hard to pick just a few: Zbigniew M. Bielak, Vania Zouravliov, Noah Bradley, Cyril Rolando… As an absolute Photoshop nerd I am also a big fan of Dan Luvisi.

 

What are three words that describe your work?

I’d say “personal” as I always translate my personal emotions to whatever I create, “unpredictable”, as I never know what my final artwork will look like, I have a first idea, then it can evolve to something completely different, the emotion always staying the same, and “adventurous”, for I always want to explore new techniques, new ways, new softwares, new styles…

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G   /   July 25, 2014   /   0 Comments