Archive for the ‘Penny Dreadful’ Category
G   /   November 26, 2016   /   2 Comments

We’ve added some new scans from the past few months to the gallery. Enjoy!
 



 
GALLERY LINKS:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Stylist Magazine – November 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > GQ (France) — October 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Grazia (Mexico) – October 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Version Femina (France) – September 26-October 2, 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > The Edit – September 8-15, 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Starpics – September 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > La Cosa Cine (Argentina) – September 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > ELLE (France) – September 30, 2016
 
Thank you to Flo for the La Cosa Cine magazine scans! To contribute or share your personal scans to help enrich our gallery, contact us HERE.

G   /   November 18, 2016   /   6 Comments

By MiNDFOOD
 
 
The elusive Eva takes time to talk to MiNDFOOD about her love of music, what she lives for and where she goes to escape.

Currently starring in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the fabulously glamorous and offbeat Eva Green, 36 (article corrected to Eva’s correct current age as of publication; original article contained the incorrect age of “38”), talks to MiNDFOOD about myriad subjects – from whether she’s ‘hot’ enough for Hollywood to her childhood fear of clowns. A former Bond Girl (Casino Royale) and regular on the TV show, Penny Dreadful, was born in Paris. She exudes an old-fashioned mysterious quality rarely seen in modern actresses, that same quality has guaranteed her a career in film.
 
Miss Peregrine is described as mysterious, smart and tough. Some might would say this was a perfect fit.
(laughs) Well, I like to think so. I try.

What do you like about this beloved literary character?
She’s so cool. She looks after all these gorgeous children and smokes the pipe (laughs). And also, it’s the first time I am not playing the love interest.

Do you smoke?
Not anymore. I used to be a smoker but I stopped 3 years ago.

Thinking about the word peculiar – when have you felt peculiar in your life?
I always felt a bit peculiar. I think lots of people have felt at some point quite different. People say I’m weird but I don’t feel weird – so maybe I am weird! (laughs). I have black hair, I felt strange as a child, I was very shy, scared of going to birthday parties and clowns.

What scares you now?
Oh, God, lots of things in this world. I don’t know where to start. Greed, pollution. Greed mostly.

Do you have any pets?
I have a dog but my sister looks after him. He’s a Border Terrier. His name is Mr. Griffin.

How do you get along with your sister?
My sister lives in Italy so I don’t see her very often but we Skype. She has two beautiful children that I adore. She has a vineyard so she makes her own wine. Yeah, it’s very cool.

G   /   October 10, 2016   /   3 Comments

By Neala Johnson
 
 
“It’s nice,” says Eva Green, “not to play the girlfriend.”

“I don’t want to be the woman in the script where it goes, ‘There’s a beautiful, mysterious woman …’ Just, OK, forget it. I think I would feel unhappy … Some people play it very well but I want to be as equal as a man, you know what I mean?”

Oh, we know what she means.

As far as mysterious girlfriends go, Green played a stunner — to Daniel Craig’s James Bond in his first, bracing outing, Casino Royale.

So impactful was Green’s Vesper Lynd, Bond basically spent the next three films getting over her.

But now the London-based Frenchwoman is over it too. Searching for the word to perfectly capture what she wants to do from here on in, Green finally settles upon “other”.

“It’s exciting to be other.”

If it’s other she wants, Green could wish for no better co-conspirator than Tim Burton.

She teams with the famously eccentric director for a second time on Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, a fantastical adaptation of Ransom Riggs’ best-selling young-adult novel.

Green plays Miss Peregrine, a woman who, while protecting a gaggle of children with unusual abilities from outside threats, also has a peculiarity of her own: as the name suggests, she can transform into a bird.

“I remember Tim called me a year before the shoot. He was like, ‘I’ve got this book, I wonder if you would be interested?’ I was like, ‘Anything, I’d play anything for you’. But he was like, ‘No, no, I want you to read it and see if you like her’.”

A woman-bird who’s handy with a crossbow, has absolutely no love interest and is slightly bonkers? It’s safe to say Green liked her.

“Tim called her Scary Poppins, which I thought was quite funny,” the 36-year-old laughs. “But she’s not a bad, mad woman — it’s all to save her children. She has the ability to transform into a peregrine falcon and because peregrine falcons are the fastest animal on earth, she delivers lines very quickly.

“I watched some documentaries on birds. It was kind of a challenge — I was trying to have little, sharp movements with my head and not much blinking at all, using my hands like claws, my long nails. You always worry that you’re going a bit over the top, but I had a lot of fun … playing her like Mary Poppins on speed.”

G   /   October 04, 2016   /   1 Comment

By Stephen Schaefer
 
 
‘Peculiar’ Powers
 
As the protective mistress of a troupe of World War II orphans, Eva Green vividly creates a woman with extraordinary powers in Tim Burton’s “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children” (now in theaters).

In 1943, with Nazi Germany bombing Britain, Green’s Miss Peregrine fiercely guards her young charges — each of whom has a distinctive “peculiarity,” like the ability to freeze objects, float up into the sky or ignite fires.

Their mistress has a power of her own: the ability to transform into a peregrine falcon.

For Green, 36, that meant screening a 1965 film classic and meeting a falcon.

“The indication Tim gave me was, ‘She’s like a weird Mary Poppins.’ So I watched ‘Mary Poppins.’ It’s more than she can fly. It’s more the physicality because of her bird-like quality.

“A peregrine falcon is a bird of prey. It’s the fastest animal on the planet, so doing a Tim Burton movie, you have to bring an edge to it. You move your head quite sharply. You can’t blink. I had to deliver the lines very fast, sort of like Mary Poppins on speed. That was fun!”

As for that falcon, “It was quite regal, actually. There’s something quite acute and fascinating. They remain quite still, and in a second, grab the prey — and that’s it.

“That’s why Tim calls her ‘Scary Poppins’ — because she’s a bird of prey; she can kill to protect her children. But she has that maternal quality as well.”

Did Green, who just ended her “Penny Dreadful” series on Showtime, get in touch with her inner bird?

“God! It’s true,” she said, laughing. “It’s not too easy playing a bird. It’s all very angular, precise. On my own, I tried to be a bit sharp. It’s just a feeling — you worry: ‘I might have gone too far, done too much.’ But Tim’s there, and he would say, ‘less,’ ‘more.’ ”

As this film is Green’s second collaboration with Burton, following 2012’s “Dark Shadows,” some critics have anointed her as the legendary filmmaker’s muse.

“I don’t know. Muse is such a big word. It’s quite intimidating, a big responsibility. I’m just flattered he asked me to be part of this adventure.”
 
 
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G   /   October 04, 2016   /   2 Comments

As Eva Green reunites with Tim Burton on the big screen, the former Bond girl chats to Susan Griffin about playing ‘Scary Poppins’ and her memories of Casino Royale, a decade on…

Eva Green is lamenting her age. “I feel old,” she exclaims when asked how it feels to mark a decade since the release of Casino Royale, the Bond movie that marked Daniel Craig’s debut as 007.

Green played Bond girl Vesper Lynd, a role she’s “proud” to have tackled, although she was tentative when first approached.

In her head, she no doubt had visions of playing bikini-clad arm candy, so was pleasantly surprised to hear the outline for the character: a foreign liaison agent who beguiles Bond but whose deception ultimately leads to her demise.

“Vesper was an enigmatic character, but very human, very sensitive, and it was mainly the love story that was very appealing to me in that one,” remarks the 36-year-old actress, beautiful yet delicate-looking in floor-length black lace.

Green was born in Paris but speaks in an acutely-enunciated English accent, her blue-green eyes defined by layers of smoky eye shadow. She’s friendly, but not someone who will fill the air with unnecessary and inane chatter.

The rumours continue as to whether Craig will step down from the role following his fourth outing in last year’s Spectre.

Does she think it’s time for him to hang up the tuxedo?

“I don’t know,” ponders Green. “He does what he wants, but he’s such a wonderful Bond because he’s so in his body. He’s sexy, raw and rugged.”

Since her debut screen role in Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Dreamers in 2003, where she and her co-stars, Michael Pitt and Louis Garrel, spent a large proportion of their screen-time naked, the actress has forged a reputation for playing empowered women, entirely confident in their own skin. But they’re not all femme fatales, she notes, as is often perceived.

“I played a femme fatale 100 per cent in [2014’s] Sin City: A Dame To Die For, there are not many dimensions, she’s like a psychopath,” notes Green, who studied acting in London and directing in New York, and won the Bafta Rising Star Award in 2007.

“In the other roles I’ve played – some of the roles anyway – they’re strong women, but there is more behind the strong facade. There are cracks in the armour and they’re quite complex.”

Her Bond role aside, Green’s standout performances include Sibylla, Queen of Jerusalem in Ridley Scott’s A Kingdom Of Heaven, warrior Artemisia in 300: Rise Of An Empire, and the possessed Vanessa Ives in the horror series Penny Dreadful.

G   /   October 02, 2016   /   0 Comments

By Nick Romano
 
 
“This is just like speed dating,” Eva Green laughs as she slides into my booth.

Along with the other main cast of “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children,” she’s been cycling through journalists all day with new face popping by her table every few minutes for a quick chat.

When she gets to me, we have 10 minutes to discuss the Tim Burton film in the Gallow Green restaurant of the McKittrick Hotel in New York City, which is a dim-lit, fantastical eatery with an antique subway decorated with potted plants serving as our lunch spot. When our time is up, she’ll move on and repeat the process with another member of the press. So, yeah, it is like speed dating.

What do we use for ice breakers? The usual: the Lynchian menagerie that is this restaurant, the bird cage decorating her hotel room, and changing things up from her femme fatales roles by playing someone who would die for her children.

Moviefone: So, how is your day so far? Have you had a chance to explore this area?

Eva Green: No, no. I just stayed in my room. It was red and there was a bird cage in the back. It’s cool. It’s surreal. It’s like a [David] Lynch movie, like in “Twin Peaks.” I mean, my room was like that. It was all in red.

Yeah, I just got off the elevator and they were like, “Okay, you’re going into this room.” And I was like, “Is this a hotel?”

It is a hotel?

Yeah.

What? Like, for when you have an affair or something? It’s weird.

Alright, well, let’s jump right into this …

[Laughs] What’s your favorite color?

Right? I’m really curious how the character of Miss Peregrine was first pitched to you. Had you heard of the books at all, or were you going off of descriptions of her?

No. I remember Tim just said to me, it’s kind of a weird Mary Poppins, and I was like, “Oh, I always wanted to play kind of Mary Poppins.” And, yeah, he sent me the book — and, actually, I don’t know if you’ve read the book or saw pictures of the original Miss Peregrine, but she’s kind of austere. It’s something, you know, like long skirt and glasses, and Tim also set it in the ’40s and he wanted her to be a bit more rock ‘n’ roll, and a bit more wacko.

G   /   October 01, 2016   /   1 Comment

By Donna Freydkin
 
 
French actress Eva Green exudes a mysterious, cool edge. And it’s put to perfect use in “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children,” with Green playing the pipe-smoking headmistress of a haven for odd kids — those who defy gravity, or house a beehive within themselves, for example.

Green, who most recently embodied seductive, sultry and powerful Vanessa Ives in Showtime’s horror drama “Penny Dreadful,” approached the role in the Tim Burton film with one guiding principle: “That of a dark Mary Poppins. I spoke quite fast. There’s something very sharp and precise about her. No messing around. The bird movements. It could go wrong quickly – that was my worry,” says Green.

She fully embraced her character, who has the same habit as many a detective. “I had two pipes. I kept one of them. I learned how to smoke them. There’s an art to it. It’s a delicate art. It helps me as well to bring a virility to her. It’s such a cool prop,” she says.

Miss Peregrine can transform into a falcon. And she has her own power: the ability to stop time and live in an endless loop. Would Green ever want to do that in real life?

“I don’t think so. The idea of being stuck and being forced to relive things, it’s quite scary. But of course, if it’s a nice holiday – today, I’d like to go to this wonderful holiday in Africa I’d been to,” she says.

It was a vacation that changed her life. “I went to Africa on my own. It’s a bit strange. But I loved it. It was unbelievable. I was scared at the beginning. What am I doing? After a while, there’s something you learn about yourself but only if you’re on your own. There’s something so free about that. It’s empowering,” says Green.

Green broke out in “The Dreamers,” the 2003 deeply erotic film by Bernardo Bertolucci. She went on to play Vesper Lynd in 2006’s “Casino Royale” and Ava Lord in Frank Miller’s and Robert Rodriguez’s “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For.”

But at no time in her career has she played the bland girlfriend, or the chipper spouse, or the pretty, wide-eyed arm candy. She has no plans to start now.

“I’ve never really played the love interest. I’ve never, ever accepted a role like that. But here it was nice to have a different goal, to have those children to look after. I love playing the protector,” she says. “I like characters who are complex. That’s why people sometimes say it’s dark. I don’t know what that means. It’s complex. Life is not rosy.”

Like actresses of yore, Green cultivates an air of mystery about herself. She is not on social media. She doesn’t do much press. And she doesn’t air her romantic dirty laundry in public.

“I feel like I’m old school,” she says of Twitter and Instagram. “It’s kind of scary. I could get addicted as well and I don’t want to get there. I understand that sometimes those media are good for a cause, or political things, for your work, that I understand. But to say you picked your nose at 4:30, that’s alien to me. You don’t want to give too much away. Look at me!”
 
 
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G   /   September 29, 2016   /   3 Comments

By Larushka Ivan-Zadeh
 
 
In real life, Eva Green is as curious as her characters. In Hollywood, that makes her a breath of fresh air.

‘A BIT bonkers and eccentric — such an unusual character,’ is a phrase actress Eva Green could use to describe herself. Instead the 36-year-old Parisian is enthusing about her titular role in Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children as a magical, pipe-smoking headmistress who can turn herself into a peregrine falcon.

Miss P’s pupils include an invisible boy and a girl who floats like a balloon. Little wonder director Tim Burton dubbed her ‘Scary Poppins’.

‘I love playing someone like this, who isn’t a love interest,’ says Green, whose breakout turn as Bond’s most significant girl in Casino Royale saw the awards come rolling in. ‘I often get asked if I get worried about being typecast as a femme fatale. But I have played so many other things! It makes me sad. Is that how people see me, as a dark kind of icy image? I hope not.’

Green may insist ‘I am not a goth. I am a big geek!’, but today she certainly looks the part: her marble flesh is made paler by her raven tresses (‘it’s actually dark blonde — I have dyed my hair since I was 15’), her petite frame is clad neck to ankle in a black lacy-sleeved Elie Saab trouser suit, all topped off with her favourite chunky silver skull ring.

Bernardo Bertolucci, who cast her in his sexually graphic drama The Dreamers aged 19, once described her as ‘so beautiful it’s indecent’, but the French/Swedish actress is now more likely to be typecast as a witch (as she was in The Golden Compass and Burton’s Dark Shadows, plus a possessed medium in Penny Dreadful) than a Euro sex kitten. It’s something of a relief that in person Green is warm, fascinating company and refreshingly peculiar.

M.   /   September 15, 2016   /   1 Comment

GALLERY LINKS:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > F*** Magazine — September 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Popcorn – September/October 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Post Magazine – September 2016
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Premiere (France) – September/October 2016

G   /   September 08, 2016   /   1 Comment

PennyDreadful_S3_BLURAY-Cover

Showtime and Paramount Home Media Distribution recently announced the release of Penny Dreadful’s third and final season DVD and Blu-Ray collection. The 3-disc “The Final Season” collection will be released on October 4th. Both 3-disc sets are packed with all season 3 episodes plus to be announced special features.

G   /   September 05, 2016   /   3 Comments

Ireland’s Ashgrove Auctions will be bidding out props and pieces from the set of Penny Dreadful!

Fans from around the world can own a piece of Penny Dreadful by bidding online in a three day sale of original props and pieces from the set of the show.

The online catalogue and auction is available HERE.

Auction dates:
September 13th (Tues) -15th (Thurs) from 10am

Viewing:
September 9th (Fri) – 12th (Mon) – 12-6pm

Visit ashgroveauctions.ie or their official Facebook page for further details and enquiries.

 

M.   /   August 26, 2016   /   2 Comments

On Euphoria:

“The theme is difficult, and the film is really… Swedish. It’s Alicia who sent me the script. We share the same agent, who thought we had a similar way of working.”

M.   /   July 26, 2016   /   2 Comments

Photographer: Ellen von Unwerth
Stylist: Sascha Lilic
Hair: Maxime Mace
Make-Up: Kay Montano
Manicure: Christina Conrad

GALLERY LINK:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > Glamour (Italy) – August 2016

M.   /   July 15, 2016   /   3 Comments


Photographers: Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott
Stylist: Edward Enninful
Hair: Shay Ashual
Make-Up: DickPage
Manicure: Naomi Yasuda
Set Design: Andrea Stanley

GALLERY LINK:
– Magazine & Newspaper Scans > 2016 > W Magazine – August 2016

G   /   July 08, 2016   /   3 Comments

by Drew McWeeny

The first real rabid Penny Dreadful fan I talked to was Greg Ellwood here at HitFix. He was a steadfast believer the entire time it was on the air, and he encouraged me to watch it. I was busy cutting the cord, though, moving away from cable subscriptions. I had no cable in the house, none in my office, and chose not to watch anything on TV. I used Hulu, Netflix, HBO Now, Amazon Prime. And if a show didn’t land in one of the services I used, then it just went on a list of things to watch someday. Maybe.

Today is that day for Penny Dreadful for me. After Greg, the person who really picked up that ongoing advocacy for the show was Brian Duffield, who shares my deep abiding love of Eva Green’s work, and he has always been insistent that I was missing some of her very best work by not finding a way to watch the show. I couldn’t justify all of the expense for one title, though. I just waited, and when I moved into my new apartment this week, I finally reversed course, buying a cable/Internet bundle with a very healthy On Demand library. I checked to see if I had a Showtime folder, and then checked to see if they had all of the Penny Dreadful episodes, and just as I got excited about that, Netflix also added the series, although only the first two seasons.

It was suddenly abundantly available and so I put on the first one this morning while working, and that rolled right into the second one, and all of a sudden, there was Eva Green, and there was this seance, and she grabbed this script by the neck and cracked it open and drank the marrow and never once blinked, damn near staring the audience down, daring them to look away.

That’s Eva Green, though. From the moment she appeared in The Dreamers thirteen years ago, she made it clear that she was no one’s fantasy, no one’s object, no one’s simple fantasy. She is willing to follow a good piece of material anywhere, and watching her tear into good writing is one of the great pleasures of film these days. When I spoke to her about her work in 300: Rise Of An Empire, I was practically levitating because it’s such a knowing, accomplished piece of work. She read that script, she got exactly how to make that character spring to vivid life, and she dug in unabashedly. I don’t think Sin City: A Dame To Kill For is very good, but she positively skins it. She leans into the stereotypes that Frank Miller’s using and she twists them all into her own particular versions of them. When she played “the Bond girl” in Casino Royale, she ended up making Vesper into something just as morally and emotionally complicated as the original Ian Fleming conception of the character, if not more so.

Tim Burton’s Dark Shadows has 99 problems, but Eva Green ain’t one. She showed up to that film to play, and she owns Johnny Depp in every scene in the film. Seems apt. In a world where men get to be character actors for decades, building rich galleries of portrayals of a wide range of types and voices and backstories, women are often relegated to teasing out variations on a fairly limited range of roles. Eva Green has never allowed herself to be held back by that, though, and when a filmmaker understands just what a rich collaborator Green can be, it seems like there’s no limit to the rewards that the finished film will reap. She should have the kind of career Depp has, and it seems like she is forcing the industry to bend to that idea instead of her having to give up and just take the girlfriend or wife roles like everyone else.

Today is her birthday, and I don’t particularly care what number it is. What I care about is watching the rest of this series in the weeks ahead, and savoring the way a TV show, especially today as the caliber of writing seems to have risen across the board, allows a great actor to do something they can never do in film, living in a character’s skin over time, building in a million details that make the character even more vivid, even more real. And if I could give her one birthday present, it would be the promise that no one will ever do to her work what Ridley Scott did when he cut the theatrical version of Kingdom Of Heaven in 2005. Her character had a son in the film who played an essential role, but when Scott was pushed to create a theatrical version of the film that was an acceptable length, he chose to cut her son from the movie completely, and it destroyed her character in a way that was remarkable. It was only once I saw the longer cut that I realized just how impressive her work was, and how much William Monahan had given her to do. Here’s hoping that as she continues to move from role to role, filmmakers rise to the challenge and they write strong, smart, eccentric roles for her to play. I’m looking forward to seeing her play Miss Peregrine in Tim Burton’s Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children, and you can see the latest trailer for it below. But I want more for her. I want her to conquer. I want her to find a filmmaker who is excited by what she brings to a collaboration. I want Hollywood to deserve her.

In the meantime, I’ve got lots more Penny Dreadful to get to. Celebrate her birthday right and join me if you’re also been missing out.

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